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    The Impact of Brexit on the Changing Nature of Immigration Enforcement for European Citizens

The Impact of Brexit on the Changing Nature of Immigration Enforcement for European Citizens

As the arguments continue over how, when or whether to implement Brexit, MSc student Edward Mohr looks at what research can tell us about its current and potential impact on immigration from EU countries.

According to a recent article by the BBC, the level of net-migration from within the EU has continued to decline since the Brexit referendum from a […]

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    Football or Women’s football – what’s the catch for women playing sport at LSE?

Football or Women’s football – what’s the catch for women playing sport at LSE?

LSE Sociology research student and footballer Marion Lieutaud and her team-mate Eponine Howarth (Department of Law undergraduate) say we should call time on the sexism which is still a part of the culture in LSE team sports.

2018-2019 has been an incredibly successful season for women playing football and futsal (indoor 5-aside version of football) at the London School of […]

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    Opinion: Oxcart rather than “Snowplow” or “Lawnmower” Parents: Our Students’ Parents are NOT the Problem

Opinion: Oxcart rather than “Snowplow” or “Lawnmower” Parents: Our Students’ Parents are NOT the Problem

Charis Thompson stands up for the majority of students’ parents who are doing their best for their children, often under difficult circumstances.

A new US poll on parental involvement in adult children’s lives is getting a lot of attention [1]. People are drawing links between the recent US college admissions scandal known as “Operation Varsity Blues” and what is being […]

March 21st, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|
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    White saviours and regressive progressivism: How identity politics ruthlessly undermines good causes

White saviours and regressive progressivism: How identity politics ruthlessly undermines good causes

In the run-up to Red Nose Day BSc Sociology student Jason Reed gives his take on whether Comic Relief fundraiser Stacey Dooley deserved criticism for posting a picture of herself with a Ugandan child.

This Friday (15 March) is Red Nose Day 2019. For over three decades, Comic Relief has loyally graced our screens once a year, delighting British audiences […]

Professor David Martin (1929 – 2019)

LSE is sad to learn of the death of Professor David Martin, a prominent member of the LSE Sociology Department for nearly three decades. Here, friend and fellow sociologist of religion Grace Davie reflects on his legacy.

LSE Library in the 1960s. Photo: LSE History blog.

I have known David Martin for just over fifty years. We met in the late […]

March 13th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Class Ceiling: why it pays to be privileged by Sam Friedman and Daniel Laurison

Book Review: The Class Ceiling: why it pays to be privileged by Sam Friedman and Daniel Laurison

In The Class Ceiling: why it pays to be privileged, Sam Friedman and Daniel Laurison offer a unique and encapsulating analysis of class inequality at the top end of the UK labour market. The book is not only compulsory reading for anybody who still believes that the UK is a meritocracy, writes Liam Kennedy, but its mixed-methods approach allows […]

  • Permalink Protestors surround Hoa Hakananai’a at the British MuseumGallery

    “Please do not touch”: what the Hoa Hakananai’a controversy tells us about museums and why more sociologists should study them.

“Please do not touch”: what the Hoa Hakananai’a controversy tells us about museums and why more sociologists should study them.

MSc Sociology student Lucy Smith reflects on a visit to the British Museum and the implications of the protests over the display of Easter Island moai statue Hoa Hakananai’a.

In his 1992 paper ‘Where Are the Missing Masses? The Sociology of a Few Mundane Artifacts’, Bruno Latour observed how sociology suffers from a theoretical deficit. Scholars have, in his view, […]

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    Book Review: Handbook of Gentrification Studies edited by Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips

Book Review: Handbook of Gentrification Studies edited by Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips

This book review of the Handbook of Gentrification Studies (Edward Elgar, 2018) by LSE Sociology research student Helen Traill is reposted by kind permission of the LSE Review of Books.

In the Handbook of Gentrification Studies, Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips bring together contributors to explore different types of gentrification around the world, debate the term’s utility for describing diverse phenomena […]

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    Applying the sociological imagination: a toolkit for tomorrow’s graduates

Applying the sociological imagination: a toolkit for tomorrow’s graduates

A group of UK sociologists believe their subject is just too important to hide away in academic departments.  They want to tool up new sociology graduates to use their degrees to improve workplaces, organisations and communities, ensuring applied sociology is a part of the undergraduate curriculum. Nick Fox explains, with an introduction from the LSE Department of Sociology’s Dr […]

September 25th, 2018|Doing Sociology|0 Comments|
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    World Cup 2018: be relieved football didn’t come home, we all know it’s better off elsewhere

World Cup 2018: be relieved football didn’t come home, we all know it’s better off elsewhere

“Everyone seems to know the score, they’ve seen it all before.” The prevailing image of English football supporters as ‘hooligans’ failed to budge during the 2018 World Cup. But then, we know the score, right? We’ve seen this all before. Here, Lucy Smith considers the pervasiveness of class power in relation to ‘the beautiful game’. 
Image Credit: (Alex McGibbon CCBY-NC-ND2.0)
When a plethora of Three Lions memes […]