Wokeness as Capital

Sarah Ang considers the concept of wokeness in relation to Pride Month and corporate and celebrity gay ‘allies’: are they a sign of genuine progress or capitalism cashing in?

June: It is most obviously Pride Month along Oxford Street. The commercial and corporate embrace of Pride is clear when it comes to marking campaigns for what has become known as […]

Book Review: The Politics of Land edited by Tim Bartley

In The Politics of Land, editor Tim Bartley brings together contributors to highlight the significance of the neglected issue of land to political sociology. This is a highly informative volume that explores a range of issues related to the land-politics nexus beyond the top-down understanding of its role in capitalist accumulation with much potential for future sociological research, writes Alexander Dobeson. 
The […]

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    A TED Talk: Internet Memes as Prosumption Objects and Prospective Photographs

A TED Talk: Internet Memes as Prosumption Objects and Prospective Photographs

Drawing on material and consumer culture studies, Valerie Ng explores memes and their place in everyday life.

 With the way memes are deployed on social media, discussion threads and personal conversations, it can be hard to see them as anything other than “insignificant embodiments of silliness and whimsicality” (Shifman 2014). Yet, as memes steadily entrench themselves in both virtual […]

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    Book Review: For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq by Ayça Çubukçu

Book Review: For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq by Ayça Çubukçu

In For the Love of Humanity: The World Tribunal on Iraq, Ayça Çubukçu illustrates how different and sometimes colliding understandings of justice, human rights, legitimacy and international law co-existed in response to the Iraq occupation through the case of the World Tribunal on Iraq, which sought to document and provide grounds for adjudicating war crimes committed by the US, the UK and their allied […]

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    The Impact of Brexit on the Changing Nature of Immigration Enforcement for European Citizens

The Impact of Brexit on the Changing Nature of Immigration Enforcement for European Citizens

As the arguments continue over how, when or whether to implement Brexit, MSc student Edward Mohr looks at what research can tell us about its current and potential impact on immigration from EU countries.

According to a recent article by the BBC, the level of net-migration from within the EU has continued to decline since the Brexit referendum from a […]

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    Football or Women’s football – what’s the catch for women playing sport at LSE?

Football or Women’s football – what’s the catch for women playing sport at LSE?

LSE Sociology research student and footballer Marion Lieutaud and her team-mate Eponine Howarth (Department of Law undergraduate) say we should call time on the sexism which is still a part of the culture in LSE team sports.

2018-2019 has been an incredibly successful season for women playing football and futsal (indoor 5-aside version of football) at the London School of […]

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    Opinion: Oxcart rather than “Snowplow” or “Lawnmower” Parents: Our Students’ Parents are NOT the Problem

Opinion: Oxcart rather than “Snowplow” or “Lawnmower” Parents: Our Students’ Parents are NOT the Problem

Charis Thompson stands up for the majority of students’ parents who are doing their best for their children, often under difficult circumstances.

A new US poll on parental involvement in adult children’s lives is getting a lot of attention [1]. People are drawing links between the recent US college admissions scandal known as “Operation Varsity Blues” and what is being […]

March 21st, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|
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    White saviours and regressive progressivism: How identity politics ruthlessly undermines good causes

White saviours and regressive progressivism: How identity politics ruthlessly undermines good causes

In the run-up to Red Nose Day BSc Sociology student Jason Reed gives his take on whether Comic Relief fundraiser Stacey Dooley deserved criticism for posting a picture of herself with a Ugandan child.

This Friday (15 March) is Red Nose Day 2019. For over three decades, Comic Relief has loyally graced our screens once a year, delighting British audiences […]

Professor David Martin (1929 – 2019)

LSE is sad to learn of the death of Professor David Martin, a prominent member of the LSE Sociology Department for nearly three decades. Here, friend and fellow sociologist of religion Grace Davie reflects on his legacy.

LSE Library in the 1960s. Photo: LSE History blog.

I have known David Martin for just over fifty years. We met in the late […]

March 13th, 2019|Uncategorized|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: The Class Ceiling: why it pays to be privileged by Sam Friedman and Daniel Laurison

Book Review: The Class Ceiling: why it pays to be privileged by Sam Friedman and Daniel Laurison

In The Class Ceiling: why it pays to be privileged, Sam Friedman and Daniel Laurison offer a unique and encapsulating analysis of class inequality at the top end of the UK labour market. The book is not only compulsory reading for anybody who still believes that the UK is a meritocracy, writes Liam Kennedy, but its mixed-methods approach allows […]