Human Rights

  • Permalink Gallery

    Colombo Development Dialogues: Migrants, refugees and asylum seekers: the Sri Lankan context

Colombo Development Dialogues: Migrants, refugees and asylum seekers: the Sri Lankan context

The ‘Colombo Development Dialogues’ (CDD) is a collaborative initiative by the LSE South Asia Centre and the United Nations Development Programme in Sri Lanka, in partnership with Dilmah Tea, the Citra Social Innovation Lab and the Faculty of Graduate Studies, University of Colombo. The third Colombo Development Dialogues on ‘Refugees, Asylum-Seekers and the 2030 Agenda’ was held on 5 […]

April 16th, 2019|Featured, Human Rights|Comments Off on Colombo Development Dialogues: Migrants, refugees and asylum seekers: the Sri Lankan context|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Linguistic minorities in India: Entrenched legal and educational obstacles to equality

Linguistic minorities in India: Entrenched legal and educational obstacles to equality

There are over 1,369 different languages in India but many face the real threat of disappearing in the near future. P Avinash Reddy looks at the available constitutional protections as well as the institutional threats that minority languages face – and how affirmative action might hold the key to protecting them.

Language is a crucial and defining aspect in the life of every individual. […]

February 21st, 2019|Human Rights|Comments Off on Linguistic minorities in India: Entrenched legal and educational obstacles to equality|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Long Read: Why has Sri Lanka’s Transitional Justice process failed to deliver?

Long Read: Why has Sri Lanka’s Transitional Justice process failed to deliver?

After persistent allegations of mass atrocities committed during the long running civil war, a new Sri Lankan Government in 2015 pledged to the international community that it would establish an ambitious reform and transitional justice programme. Four years later, many victims in the country have lost hope. South African transitional justice expert Yasmin Sooka and former BBC Correspondent Frances […]

February 6th, 2019|Human Rights|4 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    How Not to Promote Voluntary Repatriation: UNHCR and Chin Refugees from Myanmar

How Not to Promote Voluntary Repatriation: UNHCR and Chin Refugees from Myanmar

Earlier this year the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) announced the removal of international protection for thousands of Chin refugees in India and Malaysia. With the conflict between the Arakan Army and Burmese military in Chin State continuing, Michael Howard and Salai SH Lian from the Chin Human Rights Organization (CHRO) explain why now is […]

December 5th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights|2 Comments|

Myanmar 2020 – Rohingya Citizenship: Now or Never?

Myanmar’s 1982 Citizenship Law is not just a tool for denying the Rohingya their rights, it has also contributed to the military’s acts of genocide against them. With elections in two years, the next 12 months may be the last chance to reform the law, give the Rohingya their long overdue citizenship rights, and help create conditions for the safe […]

November 2nd, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Law, Politics|Comments Off on Myanmar 2020 – Rohingya Citizenship: Now or Never?|

The role of mercy in India

Shubhangi Agarwalla argues that the death penalty has bureaucratised death and in doing so, relieved individuals of a sense of their own moral responsibility within its delivery. Considering Derrida’s seminal argument on mercy, Indian society must reconsider the pivotal role of mercy within justice, writes Agarwalla.

In India there has recently been such a sustained focus on the right to […]

August 13th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Law|Comments Off on The role of mercy in India|
  • Permalink Gallery

    “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

“If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

Preceding an evening of celebrating the life of eminent human rights activist and lawyer Asma Jahangir at LSE, her friend and fellow activist I.A. Rehman discussed his work in Pakistan, the establishment of the HRCP (Human Rights Commission, Pakistan) and Asma’s powerful legacy with Amber Darr.  

AD: How did you begin your human rights journey?

IAR: It started in 1949, when I […]

August 7th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, Law, Religion, Society and Culture|Comments Off on “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman|
  • Permalink Gallery

    “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

“It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

 Following her panel presentation on minorities during the LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit, Dr Meghna Guhathakurta spoke with Laraib Niaz on the Rohingya crisis, radicalisation and the challenges facing minority women. 

LN: You have been working with Research Initiatives Bangladesh (RIB),to assist the Rohingya refugees, since 2011. Could you elaborate on how the work is helping refugees in their integration in the […]

August 1st, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, LSE, Religion, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta|
  • Permalink Gallery

    “All we want to do is fit in. To be accepted. To be part of the group”: Discussing LGBTQ rights in Bangladesh

“All we want to do is fit in. To be accepted. To be part of the group”: Discussing LGBTQ rights in Bangladesh

Following the LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit, a representative from a queer collective in Bangladesh spoke to Rebecca Bowers on the current status of LGBTQ rights in the country.

RB: Can you share with us the journey that led you to becoming a gay rights activist?

I grew up in the port city of Chittagong, Bangladesh but since my graduation I have […]

July 24th, 2018|Featured, Gender, Human Rights, Interviews|Comments Off on “All we want to do is fit in. To be accepted. To be part of the group”: Discussing LGBTQ rights in Bangladesh|

How do we live? Understanding poverty in post-war Sri Lanka

While poverty in Sri Lanka’s post war economy appears to be reducing, this does not give the whole picture, argues Anupama Ranawana, who claims that there is a wall of silence around the poverty and inequality experienced by many. To address this she writes, the government must not only consider more inclusive means of growth, but also deconstruct and […]

July 2nd, 2018|Development, Economy, Featured, Human Rights|Comments Off on How do we live? Understanding poverty in post-war Sri Lanka|

Bad Behavior has blocked 424 access attempts in the last 7 days.