Human Rights

Assam against itself: a reply to Sanjib Baruah

In response to Professor Sanjib Baruah’s article ‘Stateless in Assam’ which discussed a new focus on detention camps for ‘stateless citizens’, Suraj Gogoi, Gorky Chakraborty and Parag Jyoti Saikia reflect on the implications of reducing people to ‘bare life’.

The Concentration camps that came to the fore during the Holocaust, left a deep impact on human history. It showed us that […]

Time poverty: The key to addressing gender disparity

Rural women spend over a quarter of their waking hours cooking, gathering fuel, and cleaning utensils. Clean energy for cooking has the potential to reduce the burden of time poverty and improve women’s socio-economic status in the community write Akshay Kohli and Chandrima Das

Gita Devi lives with her family of seven in Kargara, a small and remote village in the […]

March 12th, 2018|Agriculture, Cities and Urban Studies, Economy, Featured, Gender, Human Rights|Comments Off on Time poverty: The key to addressing gender disparity|
  • Permalink Lenny K Photography https://www.flickr.com/photos/lennykphotography/35874547205/in/photolist-WE7r2X-6i71DY-V2H3UQ-6TpKdM-nk6RSz-nknaMf-nn9tpc-nk4fLY-nkq38G-nk2njF-nn7o2c-nihrA3-nkikyZ-nk2Kxi-nk2oRu-nk4331-63BhbS-nk61cy-nkDbAj-nk6amV-nn931g-nkDmwS-nkqrSL-niihmE-nk6Zfw-nk2Vyb-nk2Cge-nk2Pd5-nk6cxj-nn9avr-nk6Eg9-nknTJx-nk6NwX-nikjQ3-nk6kwA-nnoXoE-nkCHWY-nkDFzm-nnoUjx-5v6s7x CC BY 2.0Gallery

    The shape of water in transboundary river basins of South Asia 

The shape of water in transboundary river basins of South Asia 

In the colonial era, rivers were primarily seen through an engineer’s technocratic eye. With the examples of Pancheshwar Dam and projects on river Kosi, Raj Kaithwar explains how the view persists in post-colonial South Asia. 

Himalayan watershed consists of three major transboundary river basins: the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra, which are fed by both glacial melt and annual precipitation, producing a large amount of freshwater. However, the South Asian region only accounts for 4 percent of world’s […]

March 1st, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Development, Economy, Environment, Featured, Human Rights, Politics, Security and Foreign Policy, Sustainable Development Goals|Comments Off on The shape of water in transboundary river basins of South Asia |
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    Good governance, the best counter narrative and antidote to radicalisation 

Good governance, the best counter narrative and antidote to radicalisation 

Nearly a month ago, Pakistan launched a religious fatwa against terrorism and use of violence against the government. Pieter-Jan Dockx on why this is a narrow understanding of counter narratives and the only solution to radicalisation and fundamentalism can be found in good governance.

On January 16, Pakistan’s President, Mamnoon Hussain, launched the national counterterrorism narrative, Paigham-e-Pakistan. The announcement sparked wide debate about counter narratives in the country. Simply put, Paigham-e-Pakistan entails a religious fatwa against terrorism and against the use of violence in […]

February 28th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Politics, Security and Foreign Policy, Sustainable Development Goals|Comments Off on Good governance, the best counter narrative and antidote to radicalisation |

Liberal democracies, don’t give up on the Maldives 

If the Yameen government survives the current political crisis unscathed, it would set a dangerous precedent, only encouraging authoritarian-minded leaders in other nations to reveal their true selves when the timing is ripe for them. Arafat Kabir traces why the Maldives is in this situation, China’s strategic response to the crises and what other democracies need to do now. 

Known for its sun-kissed white […]

February 16th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Politics, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on Liberal democracies, don’t give up on the Maldives |

Myanmar: understanding the Rohingya insurgency

Following the initial attacks by the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) against security outposts and and the brutal response against the Rohingya by state forces, Paul Staniland explores how research on political violence can help make sense of this tragic conflict. 

A massive refugee crisis has emerged along the Bangladesh-Myanmar border, with hundreds of thousands of Rohingya fleeing violence in northern Rakhine State. […]

February 12th, 2018|Human Rights|Comments Off on Myanmar: understanding the Rohingya insurgency|
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    Under the radar: explaining participation of ethnic minority women in London’s informal economy

Under the radar: explaining participation of ethnic minority women in London’s informal economy

Many immigrant women from ethnic minorities participate in informal work because of a range of formal institutional barriers to formal employment. Anam Bashir shines a light on the reality of the labour market for immigrant women in London.

As a Pakistani student pursuing a graduate degree in London, I was intrigued to explore why Pakistani and Bangladeshi women record the highest […]

February 1st, 2018|Featured, Gender, Human Rights, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Under the radar: explaining participation of ethnic minority women in London’s informal economy|

Indian labourers, the invisible class of Bhutan  

Indian labourers, along with the aid from India, are integral to Bhutanese economy. In this photo essay, Jaquelyn Poussot explores the problems they face — from local to geo-political level. 

Indian labourers are everywhere in Bhutan. On roadsides, in tents, cutting boulders down to gravel sized pebbles, or moving large objects using make-shift devices.  But what is their impact on Bhutanese society?  Why are there so many of them and how are their facilities are permitted to be quite so tragic?

On visiting the housing of the construction workers I […]

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    “This is ethnic cleansing. It’s not just a bump in the road” – Mark Farmaner

“This is ethnic cleansing. It’s not just a bump in the road” – Mark Farmaner

In November last year, the South Asia Centre, alongside LSE’s SU Human Rights society and the LSE SU South Asia society co-hosted ‘Rohingya: Ethnic Cleansing and the International Community’s Response’, a panel discussion on the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar. Panellist Mark Farmaner, of Burma Campaign UK spoke with Rebecca Bowers about the escalating crisis and why the current inaction of the international community is legitimising […]

January 30th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews|Comments Off on “This is ethnic cleansing. It’s not just a bump in the road” – Mark Farmaner|
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    The revised Afghanistan criminal code: an end for Bacha Bazi?

The revised Afghanistan criminal code: an end for Bacha Bazi?

The war in Afghanistan has led to  a resurgence in the practice of bacha bazi, or ‘boy play’ in Afghanistan. Sayed Jalal Shajjan discusses the inefficacy of allied and local forces in stamping out this abusive practice, as well as their complicity in its existence today. 

Since the fall of Taliban regime in 2001, the international community supported the Afghan Government in […]

January 24th, 2018|Featured, Gender, History, Human Rights, Law|Comments Off on The revised Afghanistan criminal code: an end for Bacha Bazi?|

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