Law

The legacy of colonialism in Bangladesh’s police

Bangladesh Police is the country’s primary law enforcement agency and is still guided by the basic principles of a colonial establishment, 70 years after the end of British colonial rule. Laws that were enacted at the height of the British Empire remain in effect today and control the police force. Colonial customs and traditions make it difficult for the […]

May 24th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Development, Featured, History, Human Rights, Law|Comments Off on The legacy of colonialism in Bangladesh’s police|
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    “There is a need now for a systemic change for dealing with judicial accountability. This is a time for institutional articulation” – Dr Aditya Sondhi

“There is a need now for a systemic change for dealing with judicial accountability. This is a time for institutional articulation” – Dr Aditya Sondhi

 In February 2018 LSE South Asia Centre, in collaboration with the Department of Law, hosted Dr Adiya Sondhi to deliver a lecture on “Democracy and Defiance in the Supreme Court of India”. Edited excerpts from a Mahima A. Jain’s interview with Dr Aditya Sondhi:

Mahima Jain (MJ): Can the press conference held on 12 January 2018 by the four Senior […]

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    Finding ‘buried’ data on South Asia at LSE Library   

Finding ‘buried’ data on South Asia at LSE Library   

In response to a BBC article requesting for further information about other collections of ‘missing’ or not widely known data, Inderbir Bhullar looks at LSE’s holding of South Asian statistical material (India and the subcontinent, pre- and post-Independence) revealing that many of the 9,577 titles may be unique to the Library at the London School of Economics.

In January 2016 […]

April 27th, 2018|Featured, History, Law, LSE|Comments Off on Finding ‘buried’ data on South Asia at LSE Library   |
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    The myth of the false case: what the new Indian Supreme Court Order on the SC/ST Act gets wrong about caste-based violence and legal manipulation

The myth of the false case: what the new Indian Supreme Court Order on the SC/ST Act gets wrong about caste-based violence and legal manipulation

Following considerable protest and the subsequent Bharat Bandh, Sandhya Fuchs critiques the recent provision passed by the Indian Supreme Court, which issued new guidelines to prevent what they deemed the ‘rampant misuse’ of the 1989 Scheduled Caste/ Scheduled Tribes Prevention of Atrocities Act. 

On Tuesday March 20th 2018 the Indian Supreme Court passed a judgement issuing new guidelines to prevent what they deemed […]

April 10th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Law|Comments Off on The myth of the false case: what the new Indian Supreme Court Order on the SC/ST Act gets wrong about caste-based violence and legal manipulation|

Caste, class and the history of the Indian passport 

Soon after announcing plans for an orange cover for passports of ‘unskilled’ Indians, the government rescinded the proposal. Kalathmika Natarajan writes that the passport has always been a document of privilege through which the Indian state has defined the ideal upper class/caste citizen eligible to travel abroad.   

In January, the Indian Ministry of External Affairs announced plans to issue a new category of orange-coloured passports rather than the traditional navy blue for ‘unskilled’ Indians who have limited […]

March 28th, 2018|Featured, History, Law, Politics, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Caste, class and the history of the Indian passport |
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    The revised Afghanistan criminal code: an end for Bacha Bazi?

The revised Afghanistan criminal code: an end for Bacha Bazi?

The war in Afghanistan has led to  a resurgence in the practice of bacha bazi, or ‘boy play’ in Afghanistan. Sayed Jalal Shajjan discusses the inefficacy of allied and local forces in stamping out this abusive practice, as well as their complicity in its existence today. 

Since the fall of Taliban regime in 2001, the international community supported the Afghan Government in […]

January 24th, 2018|Featured, Gender, History, Human Rights, Law|Comments Off on The revised Afghanistan criminal code: an end for Bacha Bazi?|
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    Recognising structural forms of violence against Christians in India

Recognising structural forms of violence against Christians in India

India’s anti-conversion laws should be considered as a form of violence directed towards Christians in the country writes M. Sudhir Selvaraj. He argues that the discriminatory legislation and deprivation of state resources to Christians in the country amount to structural violence.

Recently, the Jharkhand state assembly passed an anti-conversion Bill: the Religious Freedom Bill 2017 (also known as the Jharkhand Dharma Swatantra […]

November 3rd, 2017|Featured, Law|Comments Off on Recognising structural forms of violence against Christians in India|

Law alone can’t protect our rivers and their ‘rights’

After river Whanganui in New Zealand and Atrato in Colombia were declared as “living persons”, the Uttarakhand High Court accorded the Yamuna and Ganga the same status but for all of 109 days. Madhuri Karak examines our faith in legal solutions for safeguarding the environment.

Four rivers in three corners of the world – the Atrato in Colombia, the Whanganui in New Zealand and the Ganga and Yamuna in India – were declared […]

November 1st, 2017|Development, Environment, Featured, Law, Society and Culture, Urban India|Comments Off on Law alone can’t protect our rivers and their ‘rights’|

India’s federal success: recognition is the way forward

In India, linguistic reorganisation solidified support for the Indian state and the Indian nation, rather than leading to political balkanisation and the breakup of the country. Katharine Adeney writes that not only is secession never the easy option, but a rallying cry for secession will only be successful if the group feels its identity and interests are not protected.

Ethnofederalism (where the boundaries of […]

October 19th, 2017|Featured, Law, Politics, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on India’s federal success: recognition is the way forward|
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    “While Gandhi’s thought can at times seem paradoxical, it had an extraordinary resonance among Indians and indeed many others during his own lifetime” – Dr Faisal Devji

“While Gandhi’s thought can at times seem paradoxical, it had an extraordinary resonance among Indians and indeed many others during his own lifetime” – Dr Faisal Devji

Following his well received lecture ‘Barrister Gandhi Takes the Stand’ at the Honourable Society of the Inner Temple, Dr Faisal Devji talks to Rebecca Bowers about Gandhi’s experience as a lawyer, and how his unconventional way of thinking inspired an anarchistic vision amongst Indians against the colonial regime. 

RB: In your lecture Barrister Gandhi Takes the Stand, you spoke about how for Gandhi social […]

October 16th, 2017|Featured, Interviews, Law|Comments Off on “While Gandhi’s thought can at times seem paradoxical, it had an extraordinary resonance among Indians and indeed many others during his own lifetime” – Dr Faisal Devji|

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