Photo Essays

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    “When you enter the Kabuliwalas’ homes in Kolkata you feel like you’re back in Afghanistan” – Moska Najib

“When you enter the Kabuliwalas’ homes in Kolkata you feel like you’re back in Afghanistan” – Moska Najib

Inspired by Rabindranath Tagore’s 1892 short story, the Kabuliwala, photographers Moska Najib and Nazes Afroz spent three years capturing the lives of the Kabuliwalas of Kolkata. Chris Finnigan talks to Moska about how their new exhibition in London reveals how generations of Afghan migrants have preserved their Pashtun identities in their new homeland.

How did Tagore’s story inspire this photographic project?

Tagore’s short […]

October 23rd, 2018|Featured, Photo Essays|Comments Off on “When you enter the Kabuliwalas’ homes in Kolkata you feel like you’re back in Afghanistan” – Moska Najib|
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    Gods, men and mere mortals: organisation and safety at the Kumbh Mela

Gods, men and mere mortals: organisation and safety at the Kumbh Mela

In 2013’s Kumbh Mela at Allahabad, nearly 120 million people gathered over 55 days in a temporary city of 20 sq km. In this photo essay, Rohit Sinha captures the event, part of UNESCO’s Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, while describing how the city is built and what keeps it together.
What is the nature of a […]

Photo essay: Hockey in the Himalayas

The Indian ice hockey team may compete internationally, but has limited resources, largely living off donations from supporters from around the world. Photographer Indrajeet Rajkhowa visits the team in the Himalayas to report on the team’s gruelling training regime in the midst of the Himalayan winter.

“When you skate at an altitude of 11,000 feet , every breath is a struggle,” […]

May 28th, 2018|Featured, Photo Essays|Comments Off on Photo essay: Hockey in the Himalayas|

Photo essay: A great anointment in the 21st century

Every 12 years, thousands of people gather in the Southern Indian state of Karnataka to witness the Mahamastakabhisheka or the ‘Great Head Anointment’ of the 57-foot high statue of Bahubali. This photo essay captures the nearly thousand year old ceremony, which has been embellished with some 21st century additions in the form of material and technological changes. Text by Sweta Daga […]

May 4th, 2018|Featured, Photo Essays, Religion, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Photo essay: A great anointment in the 21st century|

Letters from Arakan

The recent exhibition, ‘Letters from Arakan’, featured hand-written letters and audio clips alongside portraits of survivors of the brutal military and militia attacks taking place in the Rakhine State. For Adib Chowdhury, the photojournalist who put the project together, the impetus behind the project was to ‘let the Rohingya tell their story through me’. The full project can be viewed […]

March 27th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Photo Essays|Comments Off on Letters from Arakan|

The Maldives: a jewel in the blue under threat

The Maldives are suffering the catastrophic results of climate change including the devastating impact of coral bleaching. Using images from her conservation work, Smrutica Jithendranath provides a glimpse of marine life and the ways in which marine conservationists are resurrecting coral reefs. 
  “The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever” – Jacques […]

February 7th, 2018|Environment, Featured, Oceans, Photo Essays|Comments Off on The Maldives: a jewel in the blue under threat|

Indian labourers, the invisible class of Bhutan  

Indian labourers, along with the aid from India, are integral to Bhutanese economy. In this photo essay, Jaquelyn Poussot explores the problems they face — from local to geo-political level. 

Indian labourers are everywhere in Bhutan. On roadsides, in tents, cutting boulders down to gravel sized pebbles, or moving large objects using make-shift devices.  But what is their impact on Bhutanese society?  Why are there so many of them and how are their facilities are permitted to be quite so tragic?

On visiting the housing of the construction workers I […]

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    Law, nationhood and the Constitution of India as a work of art

Law, nationhood and the Constitution of India as a work of art

As India celebrates its 68th Republic Day, in this photo essay Mahima A. Jain showcases the highlights of LSE South Asia Centre’s exhibition ‘Law and Nationhood: India at 70’ curated by Dr Nilanjan Sarkar and Dr Charlotte de Mille, and the story of the hand-written and illustrated Constitution of India.

In November 2017, snippets from the lives of four figures from India’s freedom struggle, their legal training and their time spent in London were displayed alongside a copy of […]

Mumbai’s Sassoon Docks, a reflection of changing times

In this photo essay, Rohit Sinha and Aadi Rungta trace the economic importance of Sassoon Docks, one of Mumbai’s oldest and largest wholesale fish market.  The docks are a monument to Mumbai’s mercantile past as well as its thriving fishing economy.

A visit to the docks is almost always overwhelming. The stench of fishes extends for miles; the sight colourful boats and their flags, competing with […]

No man’s land: The Wagah-Attari border

Pippa Virdee has been regularly crossing the land border between Lahore and Amritsar in the course of her research on partition and the history of Punjab for more than fifteen years. As Pakistan and India celebrate the 70th anniversary of independence, she reflects on how the border has evolved over the years.

Located at a short distance of 24 kilometres […]

August 14th, 2017|Featured, Health, Photo Essays, Security and Foreign Policy, Society and Culture|Comments Off on No man’s land: The Wagah-Attari border|

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