Society and Culture

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    Lonely, under pressure and young: The mental wellbeing of India’s young

Lonely, under pressure and young: The mental wellbeing of India’s young

Loneliness is among the chief causes of depression amongst India’s youth. While conversations on mental illnesses and their management have begun, much more action is still needed, beginning with the role of families, writes Neharika Rajagopalan (Mental Wellness Advocate and Development Professional, India).

India is the most depressed country in the world. This is according to the World Health Organisation […]

September 27th, 2019|Featured, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Lonely, under pressure and young: The mental wellbeing of India’s young|

India 2019: The shifting sands of social control

As journalists, activists and protesters have come under increasing pressure over the last few years, Saloni Kapur looks at how ideas from International Relations theory can help explain how control in Indian society has changed as the country gears up for this year’s elections.

Since 2014, journalists, students and activists in India have been harassed, intimidated, arrested or even killed at […]

January 22nd, 2019|Featured, Politics, Society and Culture|Comments Off on India 2019: The shifting sands of social control|
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    What Geography Can Teach us about how Myanmar Views and Treats its Minorities

What Geography Can Teach us about how Myanmar Views and Treats its Minorities

Myanmar’s military has been in a state of conflict with many of the country’s minority groups for decades. Vikas Kumar argues that by looking at Myanmar’s ethno-geographic peripheries – one on Myanmar’s interior, the other on its exterior – a more complete picture emerges for those wanting to understand Myanmar’s violence towards minorities but also its tolerance.
Sunset in Bagan, […]

December 6th, 2018|Featured, Society and Culture|Comments Off on What Geography Can Teach us about how Myanmar Views and Treats its Minorities|

Elite return migration and development in India

MSc Social Policy and Development Alumnus, Aishu Balaji, explains why the return of Indian migrants back to their motherland is not having the development impact initially intended. 

In a 2015 address to Indian migrants in California, Prime Minister Narendra Modi declared, “India is waiting for you”, suggesting they must seize the “opportunity to serve Mother India … whenever the opportunity comes”. This […]

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    Normative causality of corruption in Bangladesh: the past and present scenario

Normative causality of corruption in Bangladesh: the past and present scenario

Corruption is widely prevailing in Bangladesh as reported by Transparency International Bangladesh and other sources. In this article, Dr Khurshed Alam frames corruption and its history in Bangladesh by observing it in terms of a normative determinant – a sociological interpretation of this economic phenomenon.

Corruption in the past

Corruption was not as prevalent in Bangladesh in the past particularly in the […]

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    Book Review: Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste by Diane Coffey and Dean Spears

Book Review: Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste by Diane Coffey and Dean Spears

In Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste, authors Diane Coffey and Dean Spears propose that Modi’s ambitious goal to introduce toilets to 123 million households across India will be thwarted by the failure to lower open defecation, which they argue, is linked to a concern for purity over germs, writes Asif Dowla.

Where India Goes: Abandoned […]

August 8th, 2018|Book Reviews, Development, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Book Review: Where India Goes: Abandoned Toilets, Stunted Development and the Costs of Caste by Diane Coffey and Dean Spears|
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    “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

“If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

Preceding an evening of celebrating the life of eminent human rights activist and lawyer Asma Jahangir at LSE, her friend and fellow activist I.A. Rehman discussed his work in Pakistan, the establishment of the HRCP (Human Rights Commission, Pakistan) and Asma’s powerful legacy with Amber Darr.  

AD: How did you begin your human rights journey?

IAR: It started in 1949, when I […]

August 7th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, Law, Religion, Society and Culture|Comments Off on “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman|

The Punjab partition: when protectors become perpetrators

Whilst the legacy of partition remains etched across the Punjab and beyond, few have attended to the role of the servicemen as perpetrators of the violence as well as protectors, writes Saud Sultan.   

The 1947 partition of the Subcontinent divided Punjab into two parts – the West Punjab, belonging to Pakistan and the East Punjab, which became part of […]

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    “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

“It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

 Following her panel presentation on minorities during the LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit, Dr Meghna Guhathakurta spoke with Laraib Niaz on the Rohingya crisis, radicalisation and the challenges facing minority women. 

LN: You have been working with Research Initiatives Bangladesh (RIB),to assist the Rohingya refugees, since 2011. Could you elaborate on how the work is helping refugees in their integration in the […]

August 1st, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, LSE, Religion, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta|
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    The hard realities of a sweet life: curbing the damaging effects of India’s relationship with sugar

The hard realities of a sweet life: curbing the damaging effects of India’s relationship with sugar

With a host of other countries assessing the usefulness of similar taxes, it is safe to say that the fight against obesity and fizzy drinks has certainly begun. In order to tackle high sugar intake in India, subtle taxes like the ones imposed on fizzy drinks are warranted, write Anmol Agarwal and Suchika Chopra. 

The sugar tax is a “tax for love” said Jamie […]

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