Religion

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    Normative causality of corruption in Bangladesh: the past and present scenario

Normative causality of corruption in Bangladesh: the past and present scenario

Corruption is widely prevailing in Bangladesh as reported by Transparency International Bangladesh and other sources. In this article, Dr Khurshed Alam frames corruption and its history in Bangladesh by observing it in terms of a normative determinant – a sociological interpretation of this economic phenomenon.

Corruption in the past

Corruption was not as prevalent in Bangladesh in the past particularly in the […]

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    “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

“If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

Preceding an evening of celebrating the life of eminent human rights activist and lawyer Asma Jahangir at LSE, her friend and fellow activist I.A. Rehman discussed his work in Pakistan, the establishment of the HRCP (Human Rights Commission, Pakistan) and Asma’s powerful legacy with Amber Darr.  

AD: How did you begin your human rights journey?

IAR: It started in 1949, when I […]

August 7th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, Law, Religion, Society and Culture|Comments Off on “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman|

The Punjab partition: when protectors become perpetrators

Whilst the legacy of partition remains etched across the Punjab and beyond, few have attended to the role of the servicemen as perpetrators of the violence as well as protectors, writes Saud Sultan.   

The 1947 partition of the Subcontinent divided Punjab into two parts – the West Punjab, belonging to Pakistan and the East Punjab, which became part of […]

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    “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

“It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta

 Following her panel presentation on minorities during the LSE-UC Berkeley Bangladesh Summit, Dr Meghna Guhathakurta spoke with Laraib Niaz on the Rohingya crisis, radicalisation and the challenges facing minority women. 

LN: You have been working with Research Initiatives Bangladesh (RIB),to assist the Rohingya refugees, since 2011. Could you elaborate on how the work is helping refugees in their integration in the […]

August 1st, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, LSE, Religion, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on “It is easy to be xenophobic, it is harder to be humanitarian” – Dr Meghna Guhathakurta|
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    Gods, men and mere mortals: organisation and safety at the Kumbh Mela

Gods, men and mere mortals: organisation and safety at the Kumbh Mela

In 2013’s Kumbh Mela at Allahabad, nearly 120 million people gathered over 55 days in a temporary city of 20 sq km. In this photo essay, Rohit Sinha captures the event, part of UNESCO’s Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, while describing how the city is built and what keeps it together.
What is the nature of a […]

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    The India-China relationship: why links between Indian states and Chinese provinces are essential

The India-China relationship: why links between Indian states and Chinese provinces are essential

China and India need to strengthen the ‘regional forum’ mechanism to broaden the areas in which exchanges take place, rather than individual provinces, writes Tridivesh Singh Maini. Such engagement will broaden the constituency for a better relationship between both countries and foster better people-to-people linkages as well as economic ones, he concludes.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s recent China visit […]

Photo essay: A great anointment in the 21st century

Every 12 years, thousands of people gather in the Southern Indian state of Karnataka to witness the Mahamastakabhisheka or the ‘Great Head Anointment’ of the 57-foot high statue of Bahubali. This photo essay captures the nearly thousand year old ceremony, which has been embellished with some 21st century additions in the form of material and technological changes. Text by Sweta Daga […]

May 4th, 2018|Featured, Photo Essays, Religion, Society and Culture|Comments Off on Photo essay: A great anointment in the 21st century|
  • Permalink Rohingya refugee entering Bangladesh Tasnim News Agency https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rohingya_refugees_entering_Bangladesh_after_being_driven_out_of_Myanmar-2.jpgGallery

    Bangladesh’s response to one of the biggest refugee crises of the century (Part 1) 

Bangladesh’s response to one of the biggest refugee crises of the century (Part 1) 

LSE South Asia Centre hosted  Mr Md. Shahidul Haque, Hon’ble Foreign Secretary of the Government of Bangladesh, to speak on the issue of the ‘Rohyngia Humanitarian Crisis’ on the 15 March 2018. The event took place following the second Strategic Dialogue earlier that day between the UK and Bangladesh.  Dominique Dillabough-Lefebvre writes about his interaction with Mr Haque and the event proceedings, where the foreign secretary gave an insightful, humble and compassionate […]

April 19th, 2018|Events, Featured, Human Rights, Politics, Religion, Religion, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on Bangladesh’s response to one of the biggest refugee crises of the century (Part 1) |

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