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Chloe

November 13th, 2014

Slightly Delayed Saw Swee Hock Opening

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Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Chloe

November 13th, 2014

Slightly Delayed Saw Swee Hock Opening

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Having opened its doors many months ago, the 24th of October saw the official opening of the Saw Swee Hock student centre. I still haven’t figured out why it took so long to ‘officially’ open the building, but hey, any excuse for a celebration!

The university and students union pulled out all the stops, and even the unpredictable British weather couldn’t dampen the mood. The day’s activities included talks, debates, musical performances and comedy acts. By far the most crucial thing to mention is the free food. When locating free food, the key is to look for the mad eyed swarm of students crowding around a stressed looking food vendor (picture a dystopian Hunger Games-esque scene). Free tacos turn civilized students into savages. Pick and mix had a similar effect, taking us all back to the sugar high of primary school discos (seriously, when was the last time you had flying saucers and rainbow dust?!)

Having battled my way to the pick and mix and popcorn stands, I settled into the comedy performances at The Three Tunns- student bar turned performing area for the day. Now I’ve been to comedy gigs before, and I know well enough to hide at the back in order to avoid the comedian’s attention, I do not wish to be picked on. The comedy performances included that of Jonny Lennard and Pierre Novellie, introduced by the hilarious Ed Gamble. None of them failed to mention the recent Rugby Club scandal- any comedian worth their salt would know to bring that incident up. Having spent the morning in class, by the time the comedy wrapped up I was in need of a nap in readiness for the night ahead.

Saw Swee gets Saucy

The evening of the launch saw the ‘Super Saucy’, a mega version of the weekly student night at the Saw Swee Hock’s Venue. With Pendulum destined for the stage, tickets unsurprisingly sold out, and the night was set to be epic (if not a little messy).

The only downside to the venue is that it is a signal black hole, making it near impossible to find your friends, but if you dance for long enough you’re bound to see someone you know. It wasn’t until 4:30 that we made it back to Bankside, an hour and a half after the lights came on and the music cut off, having taken a detour for kebabs at Café Rossi (incidentally one of the few places we’ve found near Bankside that stay open long into the night).

Chloe

Chloe Davis

Second Year BA Geography student. Follow my somewhat trivial thoughts through my time as a student in London.

About the author

Chloe

Chloe

Second Year BA Geography student. Follow my somewhat trivial thoughts through my time as a student in London.

Posted In: Student life

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