LSE - Small Logo
LSE - Small Logo

Kit Digby

January 29th, 2021

Living On Your Own During a Pandemic

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

Kit Digby

January 29th, 2021

Living On Your Own During a Pandemic

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

As a large and diverse student cohort, our living situations will all be very different. As a master’s student who returned to London to study following a year working abroad, I thought I would share my experiences of living alone during a pandemic.

 

Being alone doesn’t mean being lonely

Loneliness is common among students this year. The pandemic has meant it has been difficult to forge new friendships, meet people naturally, network, and seek support. But this doesn’t mean it has been impossible! This semester in particular has seen a renewed sense of solidarity among students, who organise to meet before seminars online, check in on each other, share notes or interesting articles, and chat about the course and life in general. To combat feelings of being distant from the university, I’ve made an effort to sign up to webinars put on by my department, join Careers events, and organise pre-seminar socials. This has really helped me feel more connected to others, despite living on my own.

 

Routine is your best friend

When the third lockdown was announced, I fell out of routine. I slept late, felt groggy all day, felt out of the loop, stayed up late, and was seriously unproductive. This is okay – it’s all part of the process, and when I did create a routine, I felt a lot better. I woke up at a regular time, cooked regular meals, had a healthy work schedule, and felt like I had the energy and time to connect with other people. Even if it’s a small step, such as waking up at the same time, or have an hour’s walk a day, everything falls into place with routine! When you live alone, it can be hard to be disciplined, but reward yourself and express gratitude for small successes.

 

Balance

Learning to cultivate a balanced life while living alone during a pandemic has been a journey! Recognising what you spend too much or too little time on can really help. I personally find that too much time on social media has a negative impact on my life in lockdown, so I’ve really tried to limit my time on my phone, as endless scrolling on social media can make me feel more disconnected. Equally, spending a whole day studying is not good for your mental wellbeing either, whether you live alone or not. Schedule in breaks for yourself that you can look forward to, like doing some stretches, or reading a non-academic book, or going for a quick walk (make sure you’re getting water and sunlight, just like a houseplant)!

 

 

Self-care

It’s a pandemic, every day means self-care day! Okay that doesn’t necessarily mean lying in bed watching Netflix all day, but finding ways to bring small instances of happiness to your day. For me, this includes calling friends while I’m on a walk or sending postcards – everyone loves getting mail! Or it could mean buying a Krispy Kreme doughnut after a long day of studying, tending to your houseplants or buying some flowers for yourself, journaling your thoughts and feelings, or cooking a tasty meal. Treating yourself can make you feel less lonely, as you’re looking after yourself in a positive and kind way.

 

 

Be honest

There have been days where I’ve not managed to be productive and not achieved what I had hoped. Be honest with yourself and how you feel, and reach out to your friends, professors, or academic mentor who will be there to support you. I’ve done this, and my experience is sharing your situation with others can make you feel more supported and less alone. I would recommend anyone who is living alone and struggling, or not living alone and struggling with the pandemic, to reach out and seek support and advice.

 

Everyone’s experiences and strategies for living alone during a pandemic will be different, but I hope this gives a general idea about how I’ve been coping with the circumstances. If you live alone and have any advice for anyone, feel free to comment your thoughts in the comments!

About the author

Kit Digby

I'm a Master's student living in London and studying MSc Empire, Colonialism and Globalisation at the LSE.

Posted In: #stillPartofLSE

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Bad Behavior has blocked 537 access attempts in the last 7 days.