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Nalifa

February 24th, 2022

5 Lessons Learnt from Catching COVID-19

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Nalifa

February 24th, 2022

5 Lessons Learnt from Catching COVID-19

0 comments | 1 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

It is true that we live with COVID-19. Even though this has become our new normal, catching the virus and coping with it takes an adjustment on our part. Right at the beginning of the Lent Term, two years, two doses of vaccine, and a booster dose later, I caught COVID-19 earlier this month. While I had mild symptoms, it significantly turned down my morale. Living away from home, family, and the familiar warmth of the surroundings, moments such as these can leave us vulnerable and wanting. However, one can learn a lot from it once the bridge is crossed and the recovery is achieved.

Here are five things that COVID-19 taught me.

1. Be very easy on yourself

The mental ability to deal with any illness is arguably almost half of the battle. Even with milder symptoms, it was difficult for me to maintain the same level of productivity during COVID-19. My mind had already internalised that I would be completely fine as I didn’t suffer from any extreme symptoms. Thus, I struggled to rationalize my decreased productivity and that created an internal conflict. Under these circumstances, treating oneself with extra kindness helped me a lot. If you are suffering from COVID-19, now is not the time to be extra harsh on yourself. Treat yourself as you would have treated a friend. You deserve it, more than anyone.

2. Reach out to your LSE peers and professors for support

Facing a disease thousands of miles away from home can be utterly daunting. Many of the international students and students from the other parts of the UK do not have the luxury to have their families with them in real-time. It is especially then you can fall back to your new family at LSE. Living in an LSE postgraduate dorm has been such a bliss for me during my quarantine. My flatmates have been extremely helpful while navigating this stressful period.

Many of my classes had already resumed in-person which I had to miss because of the isolation. The professors, the department, and the health and wellness department at LSE have been more than helpful in showing me grace and kindness and encouraging me to feel better during my quarantine period.

3. Reach out to your support system

It goes without saying the power and good vibes your support system can transmit. COVID-19 can be a very alienating experience with mandatory isolation. Apart from the physical aspect, COVID-19 related stress and anxiety can also reach a peak if one must deal with it alone. Connecting with friends and family back home can be another way to boost morale and keep in high spirit.

4. Pick up an old/new hobby

Isolation can be challenging and stress-inducing with many unpleasant thoughts clouding the sound judgement. One of the ways that worked for me was picking up an old hobby. Reading has always given me an escape from mundanity. During my isolation, I went back to reading for pleasure. A book helped me a great deal to battle unwelcome thoughts. This period can also be used to develop a new hobby. One needs only to start.

5. Always be vigilant

I was extremely careful and took all the necessary precautions before catching COVID-19. The fact that I still caught it shows how vigilant one needs to be to escape its evil eye. Please do continue to wear masks, wash hands at regular intervals, get vaccinations if you haven’t already, and follow all the precautions against it.

I learned a lot about myself during my time in isolation while I caught COVID-19. Although it is very much a reality, if you are suffering from it, you don’t have to go through it alone. Through collective actions and acts of kindness, this period can be navigated. All you need to do is ask for help.

This blog was written in February 2022. See here for the latest UK government guidance on coronavirus. Find out more on LSE’s response to coronavirus here.

About the author

Nalifa

Nalifa Mehelin is an MSc candidate in International Social and Public Policy (ISPP) program at the Social Policy department at LSE. She's from Bangladesh. She loves smelling new books, cooking Bangladeshi cuisine and is still waiting for her Hogwarts letter.

Posted In: #stillPartofLSE

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