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Nalifa

May 12th, 2022

LSE Master’s in International Social and Public Policy: Pocket size wisdom from three Social Policy students

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Nalifa

May 12th, 2022

LSE Master’s in International Social and Public Policy: Pocket size wisdom from three Social Policy students

0 comments | 2 shares

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Spring has fully sprung in London. It is, once again, the time of new beginnings and hopes in the air. Just about now, email inboxes will contain that email reflecting the red and white hue and dreams will be in the making. A year ago, I was in that position, dreaming to start my master’s at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Looking back, a year later, I wish someone imparted some pocket-sized wisdom to me to weather the storms throughout the terms.

It is with this hope I turned to my peers who are also pursuing their graduate studies in International Social and Public Policy (ISPP). I asked all of them two questions: what’s one thing that you would tell prospective students who are considering LSE for their master’s? and what’s one thing that you wish you knew about LSE or before coming to LSE about the School or ISPP?

Conchita Misquith: Thrive, excel, make it your own

India

 The LSE is a global platform comprising of people from all over the world. In this environment, competition and growth go hand in hand. So, I would encourage the prospective students to read a lot, to fearlessly voice their opinions in their fields. LSE gives you that space to share your ideas on a much larger scale. Therefore, I would tell the students to keep reading and gain as much knowledge as they would like.

I had limited understanding about the rigour of the academic environment at LSE. Coming from South Asia, our educational structure is completely different. Sometimes it felt like everything was coming to me as one giant brick at double speed. Before this master’s, I wasn’t aware of the background work that goes behind producing a quality essay. I wish I knew that before coming here. So be prepared for that challenge. Once all that work is put into place, LSE will be your place to thrive, excel and make it your own.

Vetle Movold: it’s okay to ask for help

Norway

I want all prospective students to be aware of the reading load. Be prepared to take on a lot of reading. Most master’s degrees at LSE are only one year. Therefore, to cover all the necessary material over just 20 weeks, the reading load is heavy. At times, it may feel overwhelming and exceptionally difficult. However, the skills and knowledge you will acquire throughout the year will make it worthwhile in the end.

It is okay to ask for help. All students go through hard times – and that is perfectly fine and completely normal. Talk about it with your fellow students or use the resources at LSE to help you through challenging times. Talking about your issues is better than facing them all alone.

Rin Masan: gear up for the work throughout the year

Thailand

I was completely taken aback by the amount of reading. I had some idea but couldn’t really fathom the amount that I had to read each week. Especially, if you have little or less affinity with reading (just like me), it can get tough. Gear up for the work throughout the terms.

Your expectations and reality might not always collide. Even though our program is ISPP, it is more leaned towards the social policy aspect rather than public policy analysis. There can be a gap. I wish I knew it before coming here to prepare myself for the academic challenges.

So pack your reading glasses, pen and paper. London and LSE await you on the other side with hearts full of warmth and pages full of wisdom.

About the author

Nalifa

Nalifa Mehelin is an MSc candidate in International Social and Public Policy (ISPP) program at the Social Policy department at LSE. She's from Bangladesh. She loves smelling new books, cooking Bangladeshi cuisine and is still waiting for her Hogwarts letter.

Posted In: Student Life: Advice

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