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    How economists view the US debate on extending jobless benefits

How economists view the US debate on extending jobless benefits

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Experts discuss the trade-offs between work incentives and income support; whether top-ups should be reduced, and how economics and public health might determine federal contribution levels, writes Romesh Vaitilingam.

Despite the latest GDP figures showing that the US economy had contracted nearly 10% in the second quarter and with unemployment numbers continuing to rise, there is still no resolution in […]

August 8th, 2020|Economy, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Primary Primers: Trump is about to lose, and it won’t be close.

Primary Primers: Trump is about to lose, and it won’t be close.

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Despite close presidential elections in recent years, Ronald Ranta argues that November will likely see former Vice President Joe Biden beat President Donald Trump by a significant margin. This outcome, he argues, can be predicted by looking at Biden’s current significant national lead and polling across key Midwestern states. 

This article is part of our Primary Primers series curated […]

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    Self-interest often drives US states’ adoption of Evidence Based Policy measures

Self-interest often drives US states’ adoption of Evidence Based Policy measures

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In the US, lawmaking at the state level is often heavily linked to the ideology of the party which controls the legislature. Evidenced Based Policy, on the other hand, provides a means for lawmakers to develop measures based on research and data. In new research, Luke Yingling and Daniel J. Mallinson look at what drives the adoption of Evidence […]

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    Trump’s electoral fortunes may hinge on whether he can distract voters from his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic  

Trump’s electoral fortunes may hinge on whether he can distract voters from his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic  

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With less than three months to go before the 2020 US elections, President Trump is fighting the dual challenges of the coronavirus pandemic and a plummeting economy writes Thomas Gift in this Q&A. Trump’s strategy now will likely be to distract voters from his poor handling of the COVID-19 pandemic by attacking Joe Biden as being too far to […]

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    Despite Trump’s scathing electoral rhetoric against the EU, dialogues continue to shore up the transatlantic relationship

Despite Trump’s scathing electoral rhetoric against the EU, dialogues continue to shore up the transatlantic relationship

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During his 2016 election campaign and the presidential transition period, Donald Trump made no secret of his dislike for the European Union, NATO, and for transatlantic cooperation in general.  Emmanuelle Blanc writes that despite Trump’s rhetoric, dialogues between high-level US and EU officials have continued successfully. While this key diplomatic practice is often taken for granted, her analysis shows […]

  • Permalink President Donald J. Trump delivers his presidential inaugural address during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Jan. 20, 2017. More than 5,000 military members from across all branches of the armed forces of the United States, including Reserve and National Guard components, provided ceremonial support and Defense Support of Civil Authorities during the inaugural period. (DoD photo by U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Cristian L. Ricardo)Gallery

    How pushing hyper-specific – and fact free – policy proposals helps politicians like Donald Trump

How pushing hyper-specific – and fact free – policy proposals helps politicians like Donald Trump

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When election candidates and politicians address voters, they often face a choice in how they speak: they can be specific in what they propose, or they can be deliberately ambiguous. Gustav Meibauer looks at the trade-off between these two rhetorical strategies, and argues that many politicians – like Donald Trump – aim to get the best of both worlds […]

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    If Trump lost the popular vote, it would be hard for him to ‘rig’ the Electoral College to stay in office.

If Trump lost the popular vote, it would be hard for him to ‘rig’ the Electoral College to stay in office.

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There has been some speculation on what Donald Trump might do if he lost the national popular vote but uncertainty remained around the results in some key states in the upcoming presidential election. Ben Margulies argues that Trump could try to circumvent the popular vote and rig the Electoral College in his favour, but it would be very difficult, […]

Book Review: Radical Organisation Development by Mark Cole

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In Radical Organisation Development, Mark Cole offers a new critical account which dissects mainstream approaches to organisation development (the practice of systemic organisational change and development) and proposes a radical alternative to replace them. While unconvinced of its capacity to persuade all readers, Richard Cotter nonetheless recommends that OD practitioners read the book to engage with its important and […]

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    Book Review: The Jakarta Method: Washington’s Anticommunist Crusade and the Mass Murder Program That Shaped Our World by Vincent Bevins

Book Review: The Jakarta Method: Washington’s Anticommunist Crusade and the Mass Murder Program That Shaped Our World by Vincent Bevins

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In The Jakarta Method, Vincent Bevins explores the US role in the mass killings in Indonesia in 1965-66 as well as military coups in Latin America to show the consequences of Washington’s Cold War interventions in the present day. This is a well-researched, tightly written and emotionally affecting book, writes Thomas Kingston.

The Jakarta Method: Washington’s Anticommunist Crusade and the […]

Do skyscrapers make economic sense?

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The vast majority of tall buildings—even if they appear out of scale given contemporary perceptions—have a solid economic case, write Gabriel M. Ahlfeldt and Jason Barr.

A hundred years ago, policymakers in New York were convinced that, “few skyscrapers pay large net returns…” and that, “the very tall buildings demand many things out of proportion to their increased bulk” (Heights […]

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