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    The history of Puerto Rico shows that nationalism can be liberatory rather than xenophobic

The history of Puerto Rico shows that nationalism can be liberatory rather than xenophobic

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Since its founding in 1922, the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party has combined its goal of ending US rule with a push to reintegrate with sister republics throughout Latin America, and Latin American countries have often responded in kind. Despite undergoing many changes over the past hundred years, today’s movement remains broad and inclusive rather than restrictive and reactionary, writes […]

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    Why California’s ‘superstar’ cities may have a quick recovery despite being hard hit by COVID-19 

Why California’s ‘superstar’ cities may have a quick recovery despite being hard hit by COVID-19 

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California’s ‘superstar’ cities and regions – which together make up nearly 90 percent of the state’s GDP – have experienced the highest number of COVID-19 cases. Maliha Ahmed writes that despite being hard hit, these superstar areas have a combination of industries which have been less affected by the pandemic compared to those in poorer areas. With both superstar and non-superstar […]

  • Permalink CAMP FOSTER, OKINAWA, Japan EA Marine provides security as helicopters land at the Defense AttachEOffice compound during Operation Frequent Wind, April 29, 1975. Military helicopters dropped Regimental Landing Team 4, the ground security component, at seven landing zones near the DAO compound, its headquarters building and annex. Once on the ground they moved to set up security positions. (Photo by Dirck Halstead) (released)Gallery

    Forty five years after the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam War still holds lessons for US foreign policy 

Forty five years after the fall of Saigon, the Vietnam War still holds lessons for US foreign policy 

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In late April 1975, the last remnants of the American presence in South Vietnam were removed as the North Vietnamese Army prepared to take over Saigon. Effie Pedaliu writes that even 45 years later, the fall of Saigon has lessons for US foreign policy, such as the need to plan an exit strategy in armed conflicts, and the importance of diplomacy for mending relationships between former […]

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    Book Review: Against Borders: Why the World Needs Free Movement of People by Alex Sager

Book Review: Against Borders: Why the World Needs Free Movement of People by Alex Sager

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In Against Borders: Why the World Needs Free Movement of People, Alex Sager makes a timely and thoughtful case for a borderless world, grounded in the principles of freedom and equality. The book offers a compelling argument against borders as a means of unjustified exclusion, writes Marco Bitschnau, and is recommended to all those who have long questioned borders […]

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    Those who trust government and others are more likely to comply with stay at home orders. 

Those who trust government and others are more likely to comply with stay at home orders. 

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In recent months, the majority of the US population has been subject to stay at home and social distancing orders to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. In new research which analyses cellphone data, Daniel A. N. Goldstein and Johannes Wiedemann find that people’s sense of trust in government and others is related to their compliance with going along with preventative measures like stay at […]

Why public trust in the WHO matters

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Public faith in the World Health Organisation has held up so far. But Donald Trump’s efforts to discredit it are damaging not just because they inhibit America’s co-operation with other countries, writes Renu Singh. They also make it less likely that, in the absence of strong domestic leadership, US citizens will trust the WHO enough to follow its recommendations.

As […]

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    Lockdown is nothing like being in jail. But it should change the way we think about imprisonment.

Lockdown is nothing like being in jail. But it should change the way we think about imprisonment.

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For many, COVID-19 related lockdowns have evoked – largely inaccurate – comparisons with incarceration in prison. Chris Barker writes that while the analogy is limited, such thinking should encourage us to examine our own attitudes to punishment in America and what custodial sentences seek to achieve.  

This story has two parts. The first part is about the effects of social isolation on the American public during the COVID-19 lockdown. Loneliness, we are […]

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    A deadly combination of states’ rights and racism means that many US states are choosing personal freedom over life. 

A deadly combination of states’ rights and racism means that many US states are choosing personal freedom over life. 

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States’ rights and racism have been two deadly strands in American history which have been brought to the surface in the COVID-19 pandemic. Laura Smith writes that the pandemic shows just how desensitized Americans have become to the risk of more death – especially among communities of color, who have been disproportionately impacted.

With the re-opening of states, Americans who protested against state restrictions in favor of personal liberty appear […]

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    An unequal labor market means that COVID-19 has been especially harmful for vulnerable groups including people with disabilities.

An unequal labor market means that COVID-19 has been especially harmful for vulnerable groups including people with disabilities.

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Employment across the world has taken a huge hit because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Michelle Maroto and David Pettinicchio write that existing inequalities in earnings and employment mean that individuals with disabilities and other vulnerable groups have been especially affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the social distancing measures taken to combat its spread have created huge […]

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    Primary Primers: Voters are generally happy to work alongside elites to choose their party’s presidential nominee

Primary Primers: Voters are generally happy to work alongside elites to choose their party’s presidential nominee

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Since 1984, party elites, both elected and DNC members, have played a role in selecting the Democratic Party’s presidential nominee. While recent years have seen calls to move away from a system that includes those who some accuse of being unelected elites, in new research, Zachary Albert and Raymond La Raja find that voters are actually happy with a […]

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