Ian Anson

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    Misperceptions are much harder to correct in people who know less than they think they do about politics.

Misperceptions are much harder to correct in people who know less than they think they do about politics.

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The rise of political misinformation has become an important topic, as it can influence electoral outcomes. But correcting misinformation is complicated and often difficult. In new research, Ian G. Anson examines the link between people’s confidence and their own political beliefs and the ability to correct them. He finds that the more overconfident someone is about what they believe, […]

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    Donald Trump has escaped criticism for the $2 Trillion Covid-19 stimulus. A Democratic president would not have. 

Donald Trump has escaped criticism for the $2 Trillion Covid-19 stimulus. A Democratic president would not have. 

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Last week President Trump signed an unprecedented $2 trillion stimulus bill aimed at protecting workers and businesses threatened by the Covid-19 pandemic. Perhaps equally surprising was the relative lack of opposition from Republicans, who at other times are opposed to increased government spending and growing deficits. Drawing on their work on how party-supporters feel about budget deficits and how the media […]

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    Americans start caring more about deficits and the national debt when the party they oppose runs them up.

Americans start caring more about deficits and the national debt when the party they oppose runs them up.

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In the past two decades, US budget deficits have skyrocketed, and the national debt is now over $22 trillion. But do Americans care about the size of deficits and the national debt? In new research, John V. Kane and Ian G. Anson find that people tend to care more about the deficits and debts when they are increased by […]

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    Just the facts? Why Republicans and Democrats see the economy so differently

Just the facts? Why Republicans and Democrats see the economy so differently

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Ask a Republican and a Democrat if they think that economy is getting better or worse, and you are likely to get two different answers. But what influences how partisans arrive at their economic judgments? New research by Ian Anson suggests that partisans devote attention to credible, and not overtly biased, information about the economy to form their judgments—but […]

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