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    Book Review: Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media by Sarah T. Roberts

Book Review: Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media by Sarah T. Roberts

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In Behind the Screen: Content Moderation in the Shadows of Social Media, Sarah T. Roberts explores the work conditions and experiences of people employed in ‘commercial content moderation’, drawing on interviews with those tasked with detecting and removing harmful and upsetting online content. As the problems faced by CCM workers reveal the economic, social and political distortions of the digital […]

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    Book Review: Taking the Floor: Models, Morals and Management in a Wall Street Trading Room by Daniel Beunza

Book Review: Taking the Floor: Models, Morals and Management in a Wall Street Trading Room by Daniel Beunza

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In Taking the Floor: Models, Morals and Management in a Wall Street Trading Room, Daniel Beunza analyses how the use of economic models and the moral disengagement this has created have significantly transformed the global financial industry through an ethnographic study conducted at an equity derivatives trading room of an international bank located in New York City. This is a significant contribution […]

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    Book Review: In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy by Katrina Forrester

Book Review: In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy by Katrina Forrester

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In In the Shadow of Justice: Postwar Liberalism and the Remaking of Political Philosophy, Katrina Forrester explores how John Rawls’s justice theory became the dominant way of thinking about institutions and individuals in the second half of the twentieth century. This important work sheds light on the conceptual roots of modern political thought while at the same time disclosing its limits, […]

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    Book Review: The Costs of Connection: How Data is Colonizing Human Life and Appropriating It for Capitalism by Nick Couldry and Ulises A. Mejias

Book Review: The Costs of Connection: How Data is Colonizing Human Life and Appropriating It for Capitalism by Nick Couldry and Ulises A. Mejias

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In The Costs of Connection: How Data is Colonizing Human Life and Appropriating It for Capitalism, Nick Couldry and Ulises A. Mejias argue that the quantified world is not a new frontier, but rather the continuation and expansion of both colonialism and capitalism. This book shines in using the theory underpinning the idea of data colonialism to articulate sites of resistance, […]

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    As impeachment hearings begin, Trump’s approval ratings may determine whether Republicans stay or break with the President.

As impeachment hearings begin, Trump’s approval ratings may determine whether Republicans stay or break with the President.

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Yesterday, the US House Intelligence Committee began its first public hearings into impeaching President Donald Trump, with Ambassador Bill Taylor’s testimony suggesting that Trump was more involved with pressuring Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden than he had previously claimed. US Centre Director, Professor Peter Trubowitz writes that as these hearings continue, Trump’s approval ratings will be […]

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    Book Review: Why Not Default? The Political Economy of Sovereign Debt by Jerome Roos

Book Review: Why Not Default? The Political Economy of Sovereign Debt by Jerome Roos

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In Why Not Default? The Political Economy of Sovereign Debt, Jerome Roos explores why sovereign defaults have been an undesirable last option by systemically unpacking the structural characteristics of the contemporary debt market. This is a fresh and painstakingly researched approach that raises vital questions for economists, political scientists and policymakers to address in the era of relatively low cost, yet […]

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    Book Review: This Is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality by Peter Pomerantsev

Book Review: This Is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality by Peter Pomerantsev

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In This Is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality, Peter Pomerantsev takes readers on a gripping journey through the disinformation age, drawing on his own family history as well as encounters with numerous figures positioned on both sides of the information spectrum: those working to manipulate our perceptions and those engaged in the struggle for a more facts-based public sphere. Ignas […]

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    Book Review: Dead Labor: Towards a Political Economy of Premature Death by James Tyner

Book Review: Dead Labor: Towards a Political Economy of Premature Death by James Tyner

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In Dead Labor: Towards a Political Economy of Premature Death, James Tyner offers an urgent examination of the extraction of surplus value from the death of labouring bodies. While the book does not discuss the histories of slavery or the effects of the truncation of life upon reproductive labour, it is a fluent, accessible and illuminating read that should stimulate […]

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    Book Review: Networked Selves: Trajectories of Blogging in the United States and France by Ignacio Siles

Book Review: Networked Selves: Trajectories of Blogging in the United States and France by Ignacio Siles

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In Networked Selves: Trajectories of Blogging in the United States and France, Ignacio Siles studies the evolution of the blog both as a technological platform and a medium of personal expression, focusing particularly on the different conditions that have shaped the creation, adoption and transformation of blogs in the US and France. The book provides powerful insights into the mutually constitutive […]

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    Book Review: Not Working: Where Have All the Good Jobs Gone? by David G. Blanchflower

Book Review: Not Working: Where Have All the Good Jobs Gone? by David G. Blanchflower

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In Not Working: Where Have All the Good Jobs Gone?, David G. Blanchflower argues that the unemployment rate is no longer the most accurate signal of labour market slack; instead, it is underemployment related to the rise of temporary, low-paid and precarious labour that is the significant new predictor of wage and inflation growth. While more convinced by the author’s rich […]

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