Jeff Roquen

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    Book Review: Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener

Book Review: Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener

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In Set the Night on Fire: L.A. in the Sixties, Mike Davis and Jon Wiener relocate the seeds of the radical 1960s away from New York City and Berkeley, California, centring the activism waged by African Americans, the Latinx community, Asian Americans, the LGBT community and women to ultimately redefine Los Angeles as the quintessential microcosm of paradigmatic change […]

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    Book Review: The Hidden War in Argentina: British and American Espionage in World War II by Panagiotis Dimitrakis

Book Review: The Hidden War in Argentina: British and American Espionage in World War II by Panagiotis Dimitrakis

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In The Hidden War in Argentina: British and American Espionage in World War II, Panagiotis Dimitrakis explores the clandestine warfare enacted in Argentina by both the Allies and the Axis powers. This expert analysis succeeds in illuminating the often underappreciated and supremely consequential stakes of covert operations in Latin America during World War Two, writes Jeff Roquen. 

The Hidden War in Argentina: […]

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    Book Review: Accounting for Capitalism: The World the Clerk Made by Michael Zakim

Book Review: Accounting for Capitalism: The World the Clerk Made by Michael Zakim

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In Accounting for Capitalism: The World the Clerk Made, Michael Zakim examines how an emergent class of finance professionals fundamentally transformed the foundations of the US economy and democracy in the nineteenth century. This thorough and cogently argued investigation demonstrates the grand historical consequences wrought by these lesser-known enablers of a new economic system, finds Jeff Roquen. 

Accounting for Capitalism: The […]

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    Book Review: Reframing 1968: American Politics, Protest and Identity edited by Martin Halliwell and Nick Witham

Book Review: Reframing 1968: American Politics, Protest and Identity edited by Martin Halliwell and Nick Witham

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Edited by Martin Halliwell and Nick Witham, the collection Reframing 1968: American Politics, Protest and Identity offers a volume of essays exploring the social and cultural currents that contributed to the making of a defining year in an iconic decade. The volume’s robust investigation of the socio-economic dimensions of power and protest complicates and enhances our understanding of 1968 as a unique […]

Book Review: We: Reviving Social Hope by Ronald Aronson

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In We: Reviving Social Hope, Ronald Aronson takes stock of the current state of US society, attributing the rise of Donald Trump to a steep decline in participatory democracy throughout the twentieth century and offering a blueprint for restoring hope to the body politic. This is an intellectually rigorous analysis, writes Jeff Roquen, that will contribute to a broader […]

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    Book Review: International Express: New Yorkers on the 7 Train by Stéphane Tonnelat and William Kornblum

Book Review: International Express: New Yorkers on the 7 Train by Stéphane Tonnelat and William Kornblum

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In International Express: New Yorkers on the 7 Train, Stéphane Tonnelat and William Kornblum take readers on an underground study of how experiences of the 7 train – part of the iconic New York subway system – shape residents of the city. The frequently captivating insights in this sociological account invite us to question and alter the complex social dimensions of […]

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    Book Review: Jimmy Carter and the Middle East: The Politics of Presidential Diplomacy by Daniel Strieff

Book Review: Jimmy Carter and the Middle East: The Politics of Presidential Diplomacy by Daniel Strieff

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In Jimmy Carter and the Middle East: The Politics of Presidential Diplomacy, Daniel Strieff seeks to reappraise Carter’s perceived role as a peacemaker in the Middle East during his presidency. While suggesting that the book overstates its critique of Carter’s compromises during this period, Jeff Roquen particularly welcomes the volume’s engagement with the impact of the US media on public […]

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