Elections and party politics across the US

  • Permalink Gallery

    Obama’s legacy is as a disappointingly conventional president

Obama’s legacy is as a disappointingly conventional president

Share this:

More than a decade on from his historic election victory to become the first African American president, to many, in light of President Trump’s election, Barack Obama is the epitome of what a president should be. David Wise writes that despite the 44th president’s electoral successes, President Obama stumbled in areas many Progressives hold dear, such as continuing drone […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Five minutes with Peter Trubowitz: “Mueller has left a big question mark hanging over the president’s head“

Five minutes with Peter Trubowitz: “Mueller has left a big question mark hanging over the president’s head“

Share this:

Last Friday, Special Counsel Robert Mueller delivered his final report to the US Attorney General, William Barr, who then sent a short summary of the report to Congress. LSE US Centre Director, Peter Trubowitz writes that while Trump has avoided the worst – charges of collusion between his 2016 election campaign and Russia were found to be without merit […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Adopting proportional representation would unskew US elections

Adopting proportional representation would unskew US elections

Share this:

Elections in the US are skewed: twice in the last twenty years, the winner of the popular vote in a presidential election has lost the Electoral College vote. Steven Mulroy argues that only by adopting Proportional Representation can the US overcome current electoral challenges like gerrymandering and the “Big Sort”. He writes that countries such as Australia have successfully […]

  • Permalink Washington, DC, July 29, 2009 -- NLE'09 in the FEMA Sim Center.  FEMA/Bill KoplitzGallery

    Senators who vote against their party to end debate are more likely to win tough re-election races back home.

Senators who vote against their party to end debate are more likely to win tough re-election races back home.

Share this:

In the contemporary US Senate the votes that count are those to end debate and to proceed with the motion at hand. In new research Carlos Algara and Joe Zamadics look at why some Senators break with their party and vote to end debate rather than sustain a filibuster. They find that when majority party Senators defect for such […]

  • Permalink President Donald J. Trump delivers remarks Friday, Feb. 15, 2019, in the Rose Garden of the White House, on the national security and humanitarian crisis on the southern border of the United States. (Official White House Photo by Joyce N. Boghosian)Gallery

    Yes, President Trump can use a national emergency to build a Wall – Congress gave him permission four decades ago

Yes, President Trump can use a national emergency to build a Wall – Congress gave him permission four decades ago

Share this:

Last month, President Trump declared a national emergency in order to build more barriers on the US southern border with Mexico. While many have condemned the President’s move – and Congress has voted to overturn the declaration – Eric Svensen argues that Trump is well within his rights to act in this way. The President, he writes, is using […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Why the 2020 Democratic nomination may come down to a contest between Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar

Why the 2020 Democratic nomination may come down to a contest between Kamala Harris and Amy Klobuchar

Share this:

In his second article on the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, David Wise outlines, based on history and recent party dynamics, how the contest may unfold. He writes that given the party’s seeming desire for a younger more diverse candidate, California Senator Kamala Harris is likely to be the candidate of the Establishment wing. Harris, he writes, in turn may […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Taking the redistricting process out of the hands of state legislatures can mean more competitive US House elections

Taking the redistricting process out of the hands of state legislatures can mean more competitive US House elections

Share this:

In the United States, individual states control how US House districts are apportioned: in some the legislature creates these maps, while in others this is done by independent redistricting commissions. Ahead of the redistricting process which will follow the 2020 census, Ryan D. Williamson looks at how the methods used by states to redraw district lines effects electoral competitiveness. […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    How the dozens of likely candidates in the 2020 Democratic Presidential Primary will be winnowed down to one.  

How the dozens of likely candidates in the 2020 Democratic Presidential Primary will be winnowed down to one.  

Share this:

 Almost a year before any primary or caucuses take place, there are dozens of potential candidates for the Democrats’ 2020 presidential nomination. In his first of two articles focusing on the Democratic contest, David Wise sorts through the potential contenders, classifying them as Establishment, Progressive or Midland candidates. He argues that changes to the primary process mean that we […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Primary Primers: This is how Americans will choose their presidential candidates in 2020

Primary Primers: This is how Americans will choose their presidential candidates in 2020

Share this:

In the lead-up to the 2020 presidential election, all 50 states will hold either primaries or caucuses to select the presidential nominees for the Republican and Democratic parties. Barbara Norrander outlines how presidential primaries and caucuses operate, who can vote in them, and how they may be different in 2020 compared to past elections. 

This article is part of […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Interest groups’ influence on policy comes through the presence of faithful legislative allies – not gifts to their campaigns.

Interest groups’ influence on policy comes through the presence of faithful legislative allies – not gifts to their campaigns.

Share this:

There is a growing tendency to link the policymaking preferences and decisions of elected representatives with the influence of interest groups, usually in the form of campaign contributions or lobbying. Using teachers’ unions as a case study, Leslie K. Finger finds that campaign donations are actually less important to the success of interest groups gaining influence than is widely […]

This work by LSE USAPP blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported.