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    Book Review: Hegemonic Mimicry: Korean Popular Culture of the Twenty-First Century by Kyung Hyun Kim

Book Review: Hegemonic Mimicry: Korean Popular Culture of the Twenty-First Century by Kyung Hyun Kim

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In Hegemonic Mimicry: Korean Popular Culture of the Twenty-First Century, Kyung Hyun Kim explores the global rise of Korean popular culture, using the concept of ‘hegemonic mimicry’ to examine how it has adapted American sensibilities and genres. This is a valuable and significant contribution to studies of Korean popular culture with an interdisciplinary approach that will appeal to scholars across different […]

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    Book Review: The War in Ukraine’s Donbas: Origins, Contexts, and the Future edited by David R. Marples

Book Review: The War in Ukraine’s Donbas: Origins, Contexts, and the Future edited by David R. Marples

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In The War in Ukraine’s Donbas: Origins, Contexts, and the Future – available open access– David R. Marples brings together contributors to explore the causes and consequences of the conflict in the Donbas region since 2014. This accessible book offers many observations that will help to deepen understanding of the current war in Ukraine following Russia’s invasion in February 2022, writes Gary […]

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    Gulf War Syndrome: British warnings over the risk of chemical and biological weapons release were ignored by the US in 1991

Gulf War Syndrome: British warnings over the risk of chemical and biological weapons release were ignored by the US in 1991

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Nigel Ashton writes that British scientific warnings about the dangers of bombing Iraqi chemical and biological weapon installations were ignored by the US during the First Gulf War. Such warnings, eventually dropped in order to maintain Anglo-American solidarity, were nevertheless well placed: a recent study has identified the release of Sarin gas as the probable cause of ‘Gulf War syndrome’ among US and […]

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    The reversal of reproductive rights in America is contrary to global trends. Why? Compared with similar Western democracies, Republican voters are exceptionally socially conservative, religious and authoritarian

The reversal of reproductive rights in America is contrary to global trends. Why? Compared with similar Western democracies, Republican voters are exceptionally socially conservative, religious and authoritarian

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Last week’s decision to overturn Roe v Wade, ending the right to an abortion in the US, allowed many Red states to adopt some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the world. Using new survey data, Pippa Norris looks at the extent to which these policies can be explained by the strategies of Republican lawmakers or by the […]

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