Healthcare and public services

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    Ideology influences how Congress chooses whether to give grant aid to state governments or to run programs federally

Ideology influences how Congress chooses whether to give grant aid to state governments or to run programs federally

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When implementing policy, Congress can choose to allocate grants to state governments as grant aid, or for the funds to be administered by agencies at a federal level. In new research Stuart Kasdin and Federica Iorio look at how the dominant ideology of Congressional institutions affects the design of such programs. They find that when Congress and a federal […]

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    Federal agencies can ‘buy’ support in states, especially among citizens with whom they are ideologically aligned.

Federal agencies can ‘buy’ support in states, especially among citizens with whom they are ideologically aligned.

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Every year, federal agencies award around $1 trillion in grants and contracts. How do these awards influence public support for government agencies? In new research that examines how citizens evaluate the performance of seven federal agencies, Susan M. Miller finds that when an agency spends more money in a state, citizens’ evaluations of that agency improve. When citizens and […]

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    Growth in food assistance began well before the Great Recession, and was driven by a poor economy.

Growth in food assistance began well before the Great Recession, and was driven by a poor economy.

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Under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the US government provides food assistance to those who need it. While the SNAP caseload increased markedly following the great recession, Caroline Danielson writes that this was actually a continuation of a trend which had begun in 2000. She argues that worsening local and state economies contributed to the increases in SNAP […]

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    Excluding Latino immigrant families from the social safety net hurts their children’s educational outcomes – and effects spill over onto Latino children who are not excluded.

Excluding Latino immigrant families from the social safety net hurts their children’s educational outcomes – and effects spill over onto Latino children who are not excluded.

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Recent years have seen growing discussion in media, academic, and policy circles about the problems of inequality in America. What often does not get a great deal of attention is that inequality among families with children has grown much faster than inequality overall. In new research Meghan Condon, Alexandra Filindra, and Amber Wichowsky look at how being excluded from […]

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    Why campaigns that stigmatize smokers can make them want to quit even less

Why campaigns that stigmatize smokers can make them want to quit even less

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Recent years have seen the rise of anti-smoking campaigns. While these campaigns are often successful at getting people to quit, Sara Evans-Lacko writes that their negativity can lead to the opposite of their intended effect. She argues that the stigma that such approaches bring can lower smokers’ self-esteem, making it harder for them to quit, or make them angry […]

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    Accountable Care Organizations are too small and loosely affiliated for financial bonuses to be effective at improving performance.

Accountable Care Organizations are too small and loosely affiliated for financial bonuses to be effective at improving performance.

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One part of the Affordable Care Act – or Obamacare – has an attempt to tackle the fragmentation of US health care delivery through the introduction of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs). These organizations contract to provide care to large groups of Medicare recipients and there are group incentives for care to be provided more cost effectively. In new research […]

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    As the workforce ages, older workers need more support and greater opportunities for training and development.

As the workforce ages, older workers need more support and greater opportunities for training and development.

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The American workforce is graying; by 2022, more than 25 percent of workers will be over 55. These shifts in the age structure of the workforce mean that education and training programs will become more important for older workers in the coming years. In new research, Phyllis Cummins and Bob Harootyan find that older workers on lower incomes and […]

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    Medicare helps protect the elderly against catastrophic medical expenditure risk. Increasing the Eligibility age will expose many to higher costs and financial strain.

Medicare helps protect the elderly against catastrophic medical expenditure risk. Increasing the Eligibility age will expose many to higher costs and financial strain.

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More than half of all lifetime medical expenses are incurred after 65; Medicaid protects seniors from the financial strain which would normally be associated with these costs. In new research, Silvia Helena Barcellos and Mireille Jacobson find that Medicare reduces the fraction of the elderly whose out-of-pocket medical costs exceed their income from 9 to 5 percent, and also […]

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    Education matters in how public servants approach administrative ethics.

Education matters in how public servants approach administrative ethics.

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Recent scandals in the US government such as the Veterans Health Administration scandal point to the need to reexamine how much autonomy and discretion public servants are able to exercise. In new research which examines the ethical behavior of public servants, Edmund C. Stazyk finds that highly trained managers view organizational problems through a compliance based, legalistic lens and […]

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    Book Review: Bring Back the Bureaucrats by John J. Dilulio Jr.

Book Review: Bring Back the Bureaucrats by John J. Dilulio Jr.

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In Bring Back the Bureaucrats, John J. Dilulio Jr. concisely and passionately outlines the dangers of Big Government by stealth in the USA as bureaucratic tasks become increasingly outsourced to proxies including charities, business contractors and local government. Ruth Garland writes that the book resonates with current debates over the provision of public services in the UK and therefore opens up […]

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