U.S. History

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    The experience of the U.S. Great Depression suggests parallels between 1920s mortgage lending and the recent financial crisis  

The experience of the U.S. Great Depression suggests parallels between 1920s mortgage lending and the recent financial crisis  

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Bank lending was at the heart of the Global Financial Crisis when it began in 2008, with the collapse of subprime and ‘piggyback’ loans having detrimental effects. Using newly-discovered archival documents and a newly-compiled dataset from 1934, Natacha Postel-Vinay looks at the lessons of the Great Depression. She writes that the prevalence of ‘second mortgages’ (loans which supplemented regular mortgages […]

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    Book Review: Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States by Felipe Fernández-Armesto

Book Review: Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States by Felipe Fernández-Armesto

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The United States is still often thought of as an offshoot of England, with its history unfolding east to west beginning with the first English settlers in Jamestown. But what about the significance of America’s Hispanic past? Our America: A Hispanic History of the United States is Felipe Fernández-Armesto’s book on the Hispanic past and future of the U.S., taking in the explorers […]

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    Five minutes with Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: “Hispanic America is resuming its history after what has been an interval of white, Anglo-Saxon supremacy”

Five minutes with Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: “Hispanic America is resuming its history after what has been an interval of white, Anglo-Saxon supremacy”

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Many have credited President Obama’s election 2012 election victory with his capturing of the vast majority of the Hispanic vote. But do America’s changing demographics mark an entirely new trend, or simply the return of its own Spanish history? USApp Editor, Chris Gilson talks to Felipe Fernandez-Armesto about his new book, Our America: A Hispanic history of the United States, […]

What Kerry and Obama could learn from FDR on the environment

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After successfully seeing the country through the Great Depression and the toughest years of World War II, Franklin D. Roosevelt is widely remembered to be one of the greatest president’s in U.S. history. In addition to these impressive accomplishments Sheila D. Collins argues that FDR was one of the country’s greatest environmental leaders, creating the Civilian Conservation Corps, the Soil […]

Thanksgiving is also a time to remember the deprivations and atrocities that occurred to Indians.

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This Thanksgiving week, Stephen L. Pevar reminds us that while we commemorate the Pilgrim’s feast in 1620 to thank Indians for their friendship, we also need to remember that the following three centuries were marked by increasingly punitive policies by governments towards them. He argues that while conditions for many tribes have improved in recent decades, conditions on most reservations […]

The continued traction of Kennedy assassination theories shows that our predispositions towards believing in conspiracies are as strong as ever.

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Friday marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas. While nearly five decades have passed since the event, conspiracy theories still abound as to who was behind the killing. Joseph Uscinski and Joseph Parent argue that Kennedy assassination theories have been among the most durable because of the enormous coverage and discussions that […]

Reflections on an imagined second Kennedy administration

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With the approach of the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy, James D. Boys reflects back on JFK’s unfinished presidency. He notes that Kennedy is often judged on his promise, rather than his substantial achievements in office, and imagines a second Kennedy administration, speculating that without the emotion created by Kennedy’s death, the Civil Rights Act would […]

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