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    Primary Primers: The organizers of the Nevada caucuses look to avoid an Iowa repeat in a more diverse, battleground state.

Primary Primers: The organizers of the Nevada caucuses look to avoid an Iowa repeat in a more diverse, battleground state.

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Following several days of early voting, on Saturday February 22nd, Democratic Party members will caucus in Nevada to choose their preferred presidential nominee. Ahead of the caucuses, Eldrid Herrington writes that while the Republican Party has cancelled their version, the state’s Democratic Party has moved to avoid an Iowa-like debacle by bringing in a hybrid voting system and avoiding […]

Long Read: A Post-Impeachment Roadmap for Congress

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Impeachment may be over, but President Trump is continuing his assault on the Constitution. The House can check him. Jeffrey K. Tulis gives an overview as to how, starting with an anti-corruption effort led by the Democratic Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi. 

As the primary election season heats up, there is an understandable desire among office holders, candidates, and […]

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    Why more diverse courts may be better for civil liberties in times of war

Why more diverse courts may be better for civil liberties in times of war

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In times of war, courts tend to conform to the government’s agenda. But in new research, Rebecca Reid, Susanne Schorpp, and Susan Johnson find that this pattern is less pronounced for diverse panels of judges. Using data on men and women judges’ decision-making on US appellate courts in search and seizure cases during the War on Terror, they determine […]

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    Book Review: Russia, BRICS and the Disruption of Global Order by Rachel S. Salzman

Book Review: Russia, BRICS and the Disruption of Global Order by Rachel S. Salzman

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In Russia, BRICS and the Disruption of Global Order, Rachel S. Salzman offers a new study that seeks to understand the driving forces behind the coalition that is BRICS – formed of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa –  and dispel the misconceptions that surround it. The book sheds unique light upon this contested and under-researched group of nations and […]

Book Review: Populism by Benjamin Moffitt

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In Populism, Benjamin Moffitt offers a new study that looks to assess the current state of scholarship on populism. Going a significant way to providing the clarity that can be so lacking when it comes to understanding populism, this is an essential textbook that Jake Scott recommends to anyone looking for an entry into the field. 

Populism. Benjamin Moffitt. Polity. […]

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    Medical technology: sometimes more regulation can help innovation

Medical technology: sometimes more regulation can help innovation

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Regulators are often accused of killing patients or innovation. Matthew Grennan and Robert Town ask: are we getting the balance right?

Innovation is the lifeblood of successful businesses. “Moving fast and breaking things” can provide rapid access to new advances and great potential rewards. However, with innovation often comes uncertainty, and the consequences of product failure can be severe. Clever […]

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    The Trump administration’s attempts to reduce Roger Stone’s sentence shows how easy it is to manipulate punishment in federal courts.

The Trump administration’s attempts to reduce Roger Stone’s sentence shows how easy it is to manipulate punishment in federal courts.

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This week President Trump placed his thumb on the scales in the sentencing of his past associate Roger Stone Jr, who had been convicted of obstructing justice, lying to Congress and threatening a witness with bodily harm, last November. Toni Locy writes that Trump’s pressure, which led to the resignation of four prosecutors involved in the case, shows the […]

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    Comparing incomes can make us unhappy – but it may depend on whom we’re comparing ourselves to.

Comparing incomes can make us unhappy – but it may depend on whom we’re comparing ourselves to.

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Subjective reports of wellbeing or ‘happiness’ are increasingly influential in policy. While past research has found that making comparisons with those on higher incomes can make people unhappy, Laura Kudrna illustrates that this ‘relative income’ effect may not be as straightforward as previously thought, with the structure of society having an impact on how people feel and think about […]

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    Primary Primers: Why Florida may matter very little in the 2020 presidential election

Primary Primers: Why Florida may matter very little in the 2020 presidential election

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The Sunshine State has always been considered one of the most important swing states in US presidential elections, famously deciding the 2000 election result by a narrow and contested vote margin. Kevin Fahey argues that, if we look at the evidence of recent state-wide and federal elections, Florida tends to lean Republican, and given Trump’s political coalition, is unlikely […]

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    People believe the government when they confirm that there has been a conspiracy

People believe the government when they confirm that there has been a conspiracy

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While the 1964 Warren Commission report concluded that no conspiracy was involved in the assassination of President John F Kennedy, in 1979 a US House Committee found that there may have been a conspiracy around Kennedy’s death after all. In new research, Brian Robert Calfano uses this latter report to determine how people react when a government confirms that […]

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