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About Zoe Gillard

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So far Zoe Gillard has created 40 entries.

We are entitled to gender equality – already

On International Women’s Day, and in the context of new movements and campaigns to end sexist abuse and discrimination, Lisa Gormley reminds us that the law is already on side – that gender equality is a legal right.

Feminism is the word of our times. Feminists have worked with international human rights law since the 1990s, as one tool among many to […]

March 8th, 2018|Featured, Legal analysis|Comments Off on We are entitled to gender equality – already|
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    Permalink Protest at Yarl's Wood Immigration Centre where women fleeing conflict situations are heldGallery

    The WPS Agenda requires a complementary approach to foreign and domestic policy 

The WPS Agenda requires a complementary approach to foreign and domestic policy 

Columba Achilleos-Sarll warns that departmental ‘ownership’ of women, peace and security, and a discordant approach to foreign and domestic policy, risks reinforcing gendered and racialised boundaries.

Since the adoption of UNSCR 1325 at the United Nations (UN) in 2000, and its expansion into the Women, Peace and Security Agenda (WPS), the UK government has developed its own approach to institutionalising […]

March 5th, 2018|Featured, WPS in policy|Comments Off on The WPS Agenda requires a complementary approach to foreign and domestic policy |

Equality and peace a century on

As we, in the UK, celebrate the 100th anniversary of women (or rather some women) being given the vote, Louise Arimatsu and Lisa Gormley reflect on the fight for women’s suffrage within the broader international context to ask what lessons we can learn a century on.

The struggle for women’s suffrage in the UK took place against the backdrop of three other progressive ‘transnational’ […]

February 19th, 2018|Featured|Comments Off on Equality and peace a century on|

Shades of grey in ‘sexual exploitation and abuse’

In a personal piece reflecting on her work as a gender violence specialist in northeast Nigeria, Orly Stern highlights the complexity of the relationships of women living in displaced persons camps. 

The elders were worried about the numbers of pregnant women in the camp. Women should not have been getting pregnant, since most of them were married – albeit to men who had been […]

Advancing the measurement of women, peace and security

Jeni Klugman and Marianne Dahl respond to ‘How (not) to make WPS count’, a commentary on the WPS Index by Anu Mundkur and Laura Shepherd.

Yesterday this site published a piece by Anu Mundkur and Laura Shepherd (AM and LS), both welcoming and critiquing the new WPS Index, which was published by the Georgetown Institute of Women Peace and Security […]

January 24th, 2018|WPS in policy|1 Comment|

How (not) to make WPS count

Anu Mundkur and Laura Shepherd offer a commentary on the WPS Index and caution those attempting to measure progress in the complex worlds of peace and security.

In October 2017, the Georgetown Institute for Women, Peace and Security (GIWPS) and the Peace Research Institute, Oslo (PRIO) presented their new Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Index at the United Nations Headquarters in […]

January 23rd, 2018|Featured, WPS in policy|Comments Off on How (not) to make WPS count|
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    UK government launches new national action plan on women, peace and security

UK government launches new national action plan on women, peace and security

Christine Chinkin provides an initial response* to the UK Government’s fourth National Action Plan (NAP) on women, peace and security.

I welcome the adoption of the UK’s fourth National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security – its blueprint for implementation of the WPS agenda until 2022. It is an extensive and strategic document that reflects the ambition of the Security Council’s WPS agenda […]

January 16th, 2018|WPS in policy|Comments Off on UK government launches new national action plan on women, peace and security|

Human trafficking and the women, peace and security agenda

Recognition of trafficking of women and girls as a form of violence against women and of its incidence in conflict brings the issue implicitly into the WPS agenda. Christine Chinkin introduces her working paper, which explores this latest disruption of the traditional boundaries in the international legal regime.

In the year since the Centre for Women, Peace and Security’s Working […]

January 12th, 2018|Featured, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Human trafficking and the women, peace and security agenda|
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    Did sexual orientation and gender identity play a role in the rejection of the Colombian peace deal?

Did sexual orientation and gender identity play a role in the rejection of the Colombian peace deal?

Jamie J. Hagen, author of our second Women, Peace and Security working paper discusses the inclusion of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans (LGBT) groups in the Colombian peace process. Was the rejection of the deal by an initial referendum influenced by traditional gender politics to a greater degree than has been thus far acknowledged? And what lessons can be learnt for the Women, […]

December 19th, 2016|Uncategorized|Comments Off on Did sexual orientation and gender identity play a role in the rejection of the Colombian peace deal?|
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    From Haiti to Kosovo, it’s time for the UN to accept legal responsibility for its human rights violations

From Haiti to Kosovo, it’s time for the UN to accept legal responsibility for its human rights violations

Ban Ki-Moon’s apology for the role of the UN in the cholera outbreak in Haiti, reignited the debate on the need for the UN to recognise its legal responsibility for human rights violations.  Louise Arimatsu and Christine Chinkin suggest that the UN’s failure to accept legal responsibility for the human rights violations of its mission in Kosovo threatens the […]

December 13th, 2016|Uncategorized|Comments Off on From Haiti to Kosovo, it’s time for the UN to accept legal responsibility for its human rights violations|