Feminist International Law of Peace & Security

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    Are we asking the right questions? Reframing peace and security

Are we asking the right questions? Reframing peace and security

Reflecting on the LSE Library exhibition ‘Give Peace a Chance’ and a public conversation with Madeleine Rees and Louise Arimatsu, Christine Chinkin questions the basis on which we talk about war, conflict and women’s experiences.

The LSE library currently has an exhibition Give Peace a Chance: From the League of Nations to Greenham Common.  Much of the exhibition traces the history […]

March 4th, 2019|Featured, Feminist International Law of Peace & Security|Comments Off on Are we asking the right questions? Reframing peace and security|

CEDAW, WPS and the UK Government

Reflecting on the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women’s consideration of the situation of women’s human rights in the UK at CEDAW 72, Keina Yoshida explores the synergies between CEDAW and WPS.

Introduction

It has been such a significant week for human rights and WPS, and for what some have termed Brexit and Chexit.  It is a week in […]

March 1st, 2019|Feminist International Law of Peace & Security, WPS in policy|Comments Off on CEDAW, WPS and the UK Government|
  • Permalink Linda Loaiza López Soto giving evidence at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights © Inter-American Court of Human Rights Gallery

    Inter-American Court reaches landmark decision on torture and sexual slavery

Inter-American Court reaches landmark decision on torture and sexual slavery

Christine Chinkin, Gema Fernández Rodríguez de Liévana and Keina Yoshida with the first in a series of posts analysing Lopez Soto and Others v Venezuela, a ground-breaking case concerning gender based violence in Venezuela.

Introduction

In a series of posts we provide a summary and analysis of the ground-breaking case of Lopez Soto and Others v Venezuela. This first post […]

December 6th, 2018|Featured, Feminist International Law of Peace & Security, Legal analysis|Comments Off on Inter-American Court reaches landmark decision on torture and sexual slavery|

Preventing and punishing sexual violence in war post-Bemba

Following the acquittal of Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo by the International Criminal Court, Louise Arimatsu reflects on what steps might be taken to more effectively address sexual violence in conflict. 

Preventing sexual violence in conflict has been a high priority for the international community for at least the last two decades exemplified by the myriad of policy, legal and institutional measures adopted by […]

November 1st, 2018|Featured, Feminist International Law of Peace & Security, Legal analysis, Sexual Violence in Conflict|Comments Off on Preventing and punishing sexual violence in war post-Bemba|
  • Permalink FILPS project Working group on  a feminist approach to peace, 14 September 2018Gallery

    A Feminist Approach to the International Law of Peace and Security

A Feminist Approach to the International Law of Peace and Security

With a snapshot from the first working group on a feminist approach to peace, Keina Yoshida introduces the new Feminist International Law of Peace and Security project.

 
“Why isn’t the Security Council called the Peace Council?”

Di Otto
 

On 14 September 2018, a group of international legal scholars met to discuss a new research project being undertaken at the LSE Centre […]

Kofi Annan’s legacy and the need for inclusive peace

On 2018 International Day of Peace, Ruby Weaver, Research Assistant on the Feminist International Law of Peace and Security project, considers the legacy of Kofi Annan. 

Kofi Annan speaking at LSE 4 October 2012 (c) LSE
“Most nations have monuments or memorials to war, bronze salutations to heroic battles, archways of triumph. But peace has no parade, no pantheon of victory.” […]

September 21st, 2018|Featured, Feminist International Law of Peace & Security, Legal analysis|Comments Off on Kofi Annan’s legacy and the need for inclusive peace|