Arts/Culture

  • Permalink Image Credit: Fashion Walk AfricaGallery

    Nigeria: “Education and Innovation for Poverty Alleviation” – but don’t forget the Arts.

Nigeria: “Education and Innovation for Poverty Alleviation” – but don’t forget the Arts.

As presidential aspirants lay out their manifestos ahead of the upcoming elections in Nigeria, Emily van der Merwe argues that the arts can also play a significant role in alleviating poverty.

 

Earlier this year, Nigeria overtook India as the country with the largest number of people living in extreme poverty, with 87 million Nigerians, or roughly half of the population, […]

Communicating Academic Research Through Art #LSEReturn

Gloria Kiconco explores the multiplicity of what it means for displaced people and refugees to return home.

This article is part of our #LSEReturn series, exploring themes around Displacement and Return.

I am a Ugandan writer; specifically a poet, essayist, and an arts and culture journalist.

Here is where I join the Politics of Return research project.

It is a few minutes past midday […]

  • Permalink Acholi dancing in memory of Okot p’Bitek at a workshop organised by FLCA researchers in 2017. 
Matthew Lukwiya’s portrait is on the TAKS Centre wall in the background.
Image Credit Tim AllenGallery

    TAKS Centre in Gulu: From Bastion of the Colonial Establishment to Acholi Cultural Hub

TAKS Centre in Gulu: From Bastion of the Colonial Establishment to Acholi Cultural Hub

By exploring the history of the TAKS Community Arts Centre in Gulu, Morris Omara and Tim Allen unveil the role of art in the healing process following the trauma of a two-decade-long civil war in northern Uganda.

This article is part of our #LSEReturn series, exploring themes around Displacement and Return.

The colonial clubhouse in Gulu, northern Uganda, still stands. Back in […]

  • Permalink Christ Embassy Ibadan North “Night of Bliss” poster with comedians Buchi and Bishop Chikancy among others 
Photo Credit: Ebenezer Obadare. Gallery

    On the Theologico-Theatrical: Explaining the Convergence of Pentecostalism and Popular Culture in Nigeria

On the Theologico-Theatrical: Explaining the Convergence of Pentecostalism and Popular Culture in Nigeria

As the supply of  ‘assurances of salvation’ in the Nigerian religious market exceeds supply, Pentecostal pastors are turning to popular culture to help expand their congregations, writes Ebenezer Obadare.

 

Dilemmas

Over time, Nigerian Pentecostalism has taken on many of the externalities of popular culture in Nigeria, creating a unique composite of spirituality and secular entertainment. This enfolding of Pentecostalism and popular […]

Can Pan–Africanism in Zimbabwe Survive Mugabe?

Robert Mugabe built a Pan-African legacy through his rhetoric and policies. As Zimbabwe goes to the polls, Brooks Marmon explores what Pan-Africanism may look like in post-Mugabe Zimbabwe.

In November 1958, Robert Mugabe, then a schoolteacher in Ghana, wrote home to the African Daily News, to gleefully report that George Padmore, Kwame Nkrumah’s top adviser for Pan-African affairs, had categorically proclaimed […]

Book Review – A Moonless, Starless Sky by Alexis Okeowo

Grace Thompson says Okeowo’s latest book is a compelling reminder of the lives of ordinary people that are hidden behind headlines of violence and war zones.

“There is never a single story about any place,” stated the Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie in a powerful Ted Talk almost 10 years ago. The danger of having a single story of […]

  • Permalink Willy Karekezi is a self-taught Rwandan visual artists. Karakezi is interested in everyday lives of people around him and wants to portray the dynamics of human realities. He uses painting, live making and sculpture to express himself. Kerekezi works out of Kigali Gallery

    Creating the right dynamic among our resident artists to curate impact in #LSEreturn

Creating the right dynamic among our resident artists to curate impact in #LSEreturn

In October 2017, Kara Blackmore explored the vital role art can play in developing and disseminating research to a variety of audiences and unveiled how researchers on the Politics of Return project and artists selected through the 32º East residency would dialogue to create outputs on the issues presented. In this blogpost, Kara Blackmore and Nikissi Serumaga describe the process of […]

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    Wakanda, Afrofuturism, and Decolonizing International Relations Scholarship

Wakanda, Afrofuturism, and Decolonizing International Relations Scholarship

As the highly-anticipated film Black Panther is released in cinemas, Yolande Bouka discusses Afrofuturism tugs firmly on black memory, recalling the role of Africans in contemporary International Relations. 

Next week, Marvel Studios will release one of its most anticipated films in the studio’s ten-year history. Black Panther, set in the fictional Wakanda, a vibranium resource-rich and technologically advanced African country, has shattered records by […]

Book Review: Afrotopia by Felwine Sarr

Anna Wood calls “Afrotopia” an inspiring manifesto and metaphor for a new Africa.
This book opens with a meditation on how Africa’s fate has long – since Antiquity – been decided from the outside. Its central thesis calls for the continent to move forward in a new way, locating itself at the centre. ‘Se penser, se répresenter, se projeter’ [To […]

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    Understanding South Sudan: Questions of Knowledge and Representation

Understanding South Sudan: Questions of Knowledge and Representation

Kara Blackmore explores some of the urgent questions of knowledge and its consequences in the South Sudanese context.

This article is part of our Politics of Return series, an AHRC/ESRC PaCCs-funded project which explores the dynamics of return and reintegration of refugees in Central and Eastern Africa. Follow all updates on the project on Twitter and Instagram through the hashtag #LSEreturn.

Since 2013, when post-independence war broke […]

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