Arts/Culture

  • Permalink Dakar, Senegal

Photo credit: Jeff Attaway via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2g428Fr)CC BY 2.0 )
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    Book Review- Learning from the curse: Sembene’s Xala by Richard Fardon and Senga la Rouge

Book Review- Learning from the curse: Sembene’s Xala by Richard Fardon and Senga la Rouge

Dagna Rams highlights the many uses of ‘Learning from the curse’: a fun and off-beat reportage of the place and the time, a film club companion for solitary viewers, and also a book to admire visually.

 

Directed by Ousamane Sembene, former Senegalese dock worker, who in his 30s turned to writing books and then expanded to film in order to […]

  • Permalink Amina Boubé encourages young women in Niger to to say no to forced marriage

Photo credit: World Bank Photo Collection via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2vO34Yn) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: Marriage by Force?: Contestation over Consent and Coercion in Africa by Annie Bunting, Benjamin N. Lawrance, and Richard L. Roberts (eds.)

Book Review: Marriage by Force?: Contestation over Consent and Coercion in Africa by Annie Bunting, Benjamin N. Lawrance, and Richard L. Roberts (eds.)

Rhian Keyse recommends this book as essential reading for scholars and practitioners engaging in work to analyse and intervene in gender-based violence on the African continent and elsewhere.

Forced marriage in sub-Saharan Africa is a source of much international debate, especially with recent legal and policy attention to the role of such practices in conflict situations. Well-reported instances such as […]

  • Permalink Locally fabricated radio station in Ghana.

Photo credit: Erik (HASH) Hersman via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2sCUIy6) CC BY 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: Everyday Media Culture in Africa: Audiences and Users edited by Wendy Willems and Winston Mano

Book Review: Everyday Media Culture in Africa: Audiences and Users edited by Wendy Willems and Winston Mano

Peter Chonka argues that the volume provides stimulating contributions that highlight the importance of changing media technologies in the ‘everyday’ lives of people on the African continent.

 

Featuring rich ethnographic and textual material – ranging from the phone use of Zanzibari hijabi ‘ninjas’ to a Zimbabwean tabloid’s take on the ‘Bulawayo penis prophet’ – the publisher’s generic series cover image […]

Film Review: N.G.O. – Nothing Going On

Simone Datzberger interviews Arnold Aganze whose latest film serves as a stern critique of how NGOs operate in African countries.

“Colonialism was easier to fight than the massive industry of NGOs in Africa.” says Arnold Aganze, a Congolese writer and director of his latest movie: N.G.O. – Nothing Going On. The movie starts off as a light story about how […]

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    Moroccan Francophone Literature in Translation: Abdellatif Laâbi’s In Praise of Defeat & Abdelkebir Khatibi’s Tattooed Memory

Moroccan Francophone Literature in Translation: Abdellatif Laâbi’s In Praise of Defeat & Abdelkebir Khatibi’s Tattooed Memory

As works of Morocco’s most famed writers are being translated for English readers to discover, Khalid Lyamlahy explores how translators have sought to capture the full range of nuance and diversity in their volumes, offering a new perspective on Moroccan identity and culture.

 

What can an Anglophone reader learn from Moroccan Francophone literature? At a time when multilingualism is […]

  • Permalink A young Seretse Khama who would later become the first President of BotswanaGallery

    Reading List: @AfricaAtLSE Blog Posts of the Year – Editor’s Cut

Reading List: @AfricaAtLSE Blog Posts of the Year – Editor’s Cut

You may have already have seen our Most Popular Blog Posts of the Year, so you may be wondering what this is about. Well, this is to capture notable articles which did not make it into the Top 10, but stood out in other ways. This could be the way they resonated with their readers or how aptly they […]

  • A boy splashes water onto his face
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    Book Review – Water: New Short Fiction from Africa edited by Nick Mulgrew and Karina Szczurek

Book Review – Water: New Short Fiction from Africa edited by Nick Mulgrew and Karina Szczurek

Arresting, memorable and innovative – that is how LSE’s Matt Birkinshaw describes the new collection of short stories entitled Water: New Short Fiction from Africa.

A diverse collection of 21 pieces of short fiction in English, Water features work from across the continent with a concentration in South, and southern Africa.  The book presents work submitted to Short Story Day Africa […]

  • Permalink Egyptian actress Dalia Basiouny performing at the La MaMa Experimental Theatre Gallery

    Book Review – African Theatre 14: Contemporary Women Edited by Jane Plastow, Yvette Hutchison and Christine Matzke

Book Review – African Theatre 14: Contemporary Women Edited by Jane Plastow, Yvette Hutchison and Christine Matzke

African Theatre 14: Contemporary Women looks at the lives, challenges and contributions of African women from across the continent to making and participating in theatre in the 21st century. Yovanka Perdigão calls this book a useful aid to further the conversation on how to improve accessibility and the work of African women in theatre.

Little is known of the role […]

  • Permalink Serge Attukwei Clottey and GoLokal, My Mother's Wardrobe, performance at Gallery 1957, 6 March 2016, courtesy the artist and Gallery 1957, photo by Nii OdzenmaGallery

    Art and its role in telling personal, family and collective histories

Art and its role in telling personal, family and collective histories

As a new art gallery launches in Accra, Nyaguthii Maina meets creative director Nana Oforiatta Ayim to discuss the art and creative industry in Ghana.

On March 6 2016 as Ghana marked 59 years of independence, Gallery 1957, a new gallery with a curatorial focus on contemporary Ghanaian art by the country’s most significant artists celebrated its inaugural exhibition. With […]

  • Permalink Credit: TimesHigherEd via Flickr (http://bit.ly/1y7LfhC)Gallery

    In Pius Adesanmi’s speech and writing, there is hope for a Pan-African future

In Pius Adesanmi’s speech and writing, there is hope for a Pan-African future

In the third of a series of articles ahead of the 2016 LSE Africa Summit, Justin Villamil and Yossie Olaleye meet Professor Pius Adesanmi to discuss current issues in Nigerian politics, the African diaspora, and contemporary Nigerian literature.

Follow the LSE Space For Thought Literary Festival 2016 on Twitter with the hashtag #LSELitFest.

If you close your eyes and picture a literature […]

February 25th, 2016|Arts/Culture, Featured|1 Comment|

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