About Blog Admin

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Blog Admin has created 326 entries.
  • Banksy_Child_with_Hammer_NYC
    Permalink Gallery

    Taking Culture Seriously: How can we build positive change and coherent practice within our research communities?

Taking Culture Seriously: How can we build positive change and coherent practice within our research communities?

Change in higher education often progresses slowly. If scholars are serious about wanting to change disciplinary and institutional cultures and not merely to wait for Cultural Change to magically happen, Cameron Neylon argues we need to consider the differing approaches to how certain cultures operate, interact and eventually change. Ultimately, change in higher education requires a variety of levers […]

  • Language_learning
    Permalink Gallery

    With language studies in decline, we need a relevant and integrated approach to foreign languages in the classroom.

With language studies in decline, we need a relevant and integrated approach to foreign languages in the classroom.

There has been a rapid decline in the number of university language departments since the early 2000s. Michael Tavares provides wider context on the state of language teaching and learning in Britain and looks in particular at how universities might boost the relevance of language studies in other degree programmes. By incorporating language exercises and materials for specific purposes, the teaching of foreign […]

  • tcd
    Permalink Gallery

    ‘We need to speak about race’: Examining the barriers to full and equal participation in university life

‘We need to speak about race’: Examining the barriers to full and equal participation in university life

Looking to examine and address the barriers facing black and minority ethnic academic staff, the LSE is funding a project entitled ‘Race in the Academy’ investigating why so few black and ethnic minority academics are attracted to the LSE and why it struggles to retain black and ethnic minority academic staff. The project is led by Caroline Howarth and Akile Ahmet. […]

  • bayeaux taperstry
    Permalink Gallery

    “Tenure can withstand Twitter”: We need policies that promote science communication and protect those who engage.

“Tenure can withstand Twitter”: We need policies that promote science communication and protect those who engage.

In the age of social media, the professor’s podium has expanded. Cassidy R. Sugimoto argues so too must our policies on science communication and academic freedom. Academic freedom is a right for unfettered freedom to research, but also with an obligation to disseminate that research. Twitter and other social media can be used to fulfill this obligation. What we need […]

  • AWI-core-archive_hg
    Permalink Gallery

    Political History in the Digital Age: The challenges of archiving and analysing born digital sources.

Political History in the Digital Age: The challenges of archiving and analysing born digital sources.

The vast bulk of source material for historical research is still paper-based. But this is bound to change. Dr Helen McCarthy considers the lessons from the Mile End Institute’s conference on Contemporary Political History in the Digital Age. The specific challenges of using a ‘born digital source’ is an area that requires considerable attention. For political historians, the advent of […]

  • smartphone-featured twitter
    Permalink Gallery

    Ten years on, how are universities using Twitter to engage with their communities? #LoveTwitter LSE Round-Up

Ten years on, how are universities using Twitter to engage with their communities? #LoveTwitter LSE Round-Up

Amy Mollett, Social Media Manager at the London School of Economics, rounds up how LSE currently uses Twitter for sharing research, interacting with students and alumni, and promoting events. She also looks at what the future of academic social media might look like. For #LoveTwitter day she digs into the altmetrics and shares the most tweeted about pieces of […]

  • gender
    Permalink Gallery

    In a world in which ‘everyday sexism’ remains rife, progress on gender discrimination will require quotas

In a world in which ‘everyday sexism’ remains rife, progress on gender discrimination will require quotas

The UK continues to exhibit large disparities in power and representation between men and women. Gender inequality exists within the context of overlapping areas of social, political, professional and economic life. Only a systemic approach offers any hope of tackling the issue. Nicola Lacey of the LSE’s Commission on Gender, Inequality and Power shares findings from the final report, and recommends […]

  • typewriter
    Permalink Gallery

    On the Materiality of Writing in Academia or Remembering Where I Put My Thoughts

On the Materiality of Writing in Academia or Remembering Where I Put My Thoughts

In this feature essay, Ninna Meier reflects on the materiality of the writing – and re-writing – process in academic research. She explores the ways in which our ever-accumulating thoughts come to form layers on the material objects in which we write our notes and discusses the pleasures of co-authorship. 

This essay originally appeared on LSE Review of Books and is the first in […]

  • eco belfast
    Permalink Gallery

    The role of ego in academic profile services: Comparing Google Scholar, ResearchGate, Mendeley, and ResearcherID

The role of ego in academic profile services: Comparing Google Scholar, ResearchGate, Mendeley, and ResearcherID

Academic profiling services are a pervasive feature of scholarly life. Alberto Martín-Martín, Enrique Orduna-Malea and Emilio Delgado López-Cózar discuss the advantages and disadvantages of major profile platforms and look at the role of ego in how these services are built and used. Scholars validate these services by using them and should be aware that the portraits shown in these platforms depend to a great […]

  • oxford spires
    Permalink Gallery

    Ancient Cultures of Conceit Reloaded? A comparative look at the rise of metrics in higher education.

Ancient Cultures of Conceit Reloaded? A comparative look at the rise of metrics in higher education.

When considering the power of metrics and audit culture in higher education, are we at risk of romanticising the past? Have academics ever really worked in an environment free from ‘measurement’? Roger Burrows draws on his own recollection of the 1986 Research Selectivity Exercise (RSE), scholarly work on academic labour and fictional portrayals of academic life, which all demonstrate the substantial expansion of the role […]

  • Alma_Mater_Europaea_university_graduation_ceremony._Maribor,_Slovenia,_12_March_2013
    Permalink Gallery

    British universities excel in the social sciences. How much of their success depends on EU membership?

British universities excel in the social sciences. How much of their success depends on EU membership?

Some British academics have argued that the social sciences would suffer if the UK left the Union, on the grounds that the EU brings funding and enhances collaboration. But the EU’s contribution to this area is not that simple, argues David Walker. Nor is it correct to claim, as the Leave lobby has, that money currently handed to Europe could […]

  • 4304374413_5154dc4b9f_b
    Permalink Gallery

    Improving the lack of racial diversity amongst academic staff: will the Race Equality Charter make a difference?

Improving the lack of racial diversity amongst academic staff: will the Race Equality Charter make a difference?

The numbers on diversity in academia are discouraging. There are currently only 70 black professors in the UK; of these, only 17 of are female. As part of ongoing efforts to address these disappointing numbers, the Race Equality Charter mark was recently introduced by the Equality Challenge Unit. But will it make academia more diverse? Kalwant Bhopal explains how the process works and writes […]

February 5th, 2016|Higher Education|2 Comments|
  • delete
    Permalink Gallery

    Should you #DeleteAcademiaEdu? On the role of commercial services in scholarly communication.

Should you #DeleteAcademiaEdu? On the role of commercial services in scholarly communication.

Reflecting on the recent surge of criticism about the commercial motives of scholarly social media platform Academia.edu, Paolo Mangiafico argues this is now an ideal opportunity for scholars to make informed choices about their work. If you are comfortable with the trade-offs and risks, and willing to exchange those for the service provided, then don’t #DeleteAcademiaEdu. But consider whether alternatives exist that will meet […]

  • quote-chalk-think-words
    Permalink Gallery

    ‘First you see, then you know’: Becoming more creative in academic work

‘First you see, then you know’: Becoming more creative in academic work

Across disciplines and projects, there can be pressure for researchers to provide novel insights. But this can be easier said than done. Patrick Dunleavy offers some helpful strategies for innovative and creative thinking. Look beyond your discipline and through forms of science and scholarly communication that are more accessible. And make sure to keep a record (perhaps as a blog?) so you don’t […]

  • kid internet#
    Permalink Gallery

    6 things policymakers need to know about children and the internet

6 things policymakers need to know about children and the internet

The digital environment offers many opportunities, but also opens up certain risks, particularly for children. How can government action look to maximise children’s online opportunities – thereby boosting digital skills and literacies – without substantially adding to their risks? Sonia Livingstone presents six points that policymakers should consider to encourage wider support of children’s digital opportunities.

I’ve been researching children’s internet use […]

  • Jerusalem1
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Jerusalem: The Spatial Politics of a Divided Metropolis by Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen

Book Review: Jerusalem: The Spatial Politics of a Divided Metropolis by Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen

In Jerusalem: The Spatial Politics of a Divided Metropolis, Anne B. Shlay and Gillad Rosen outline the geographic dynamics of contemporary Jerusalem. While the book is occasionally simplistic in some areas of its analysis, Kenny Schmitt praises the authors for navigating complex terrain with skill and clarity to produce an approachable introduction to the spatial politics of the city.

This […]

  • metric bird
    Permalink Gallery

    Being trained by Twitter stats: Social media and the expanding ways we are measured in everyday life.

Being trained by Twitter stats: Social media and the expanding ways we are measured in everyday life.

With the wider availability of real-time analytics on social media, what do all these metrics mean for the way that we interact with each other and for how we understand and judge ourselves? David Beer argues these developments could be seen as part of the broader metricisation of society. As we respond to performance metrics in our workplaces, so too we are […]

  • Newton after William Blake by Eduardo Paolozzi 1995 at the British Library
    Permalink Newton after William Blake by Eduardo Paolozzi 1995 at the British LibraryGallery

    Standing on the shoulders of the Google giant: Sustainable discovery and Google Scholar’s comprehensive coverage.

Standing on the shoulders of the Google giant: Sustainable discovery and Google Scholar’s comprehensive coverage.

The 11th anniversary of Google Scholar passed yesterday. Max Kemman provides an overview of the growth and impact of the platform and also looks at why Google Scholar is virtually unrivaled. The scholarly community might ask whether it is entirely desirable that Google plays such an important role in the scholarly workflow. Not only does Google Scholar have a known effect on discovery and citation […]

This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.