About Blog Admin

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Blog Admin has created 341 entries.

The last great unknown? The impact of academic conferences.

What do academic conferences contribute? How do academic conferences make a difference both in the lives of academics and wider society? Donald J Nicolson looks at a few examples of conferences that have been able to make a demonstrable impact and argues it is to the benefit of the academy to learn more about how to get the most […]

  • Graphic_Design collaboration
    Permalink Gallery

    Research collaboration between universities and industry: Five practical principles to make it work.

Research collaboration between universities and industry: Five practical principles to make it work.

Increasingly, academics and practitioners in the UK are urged to work together in collaborative research. Ana Isabel Canhoto and Sarah Quinton discuss how social features, material characteristics, and the attributes of the individuals engaged in research collaboration can support the success of a collaborative research project.

Research collaboration is deemed to accelerate the transfer of knowledge between experts and the translation […]

  • slack invitations
    Permalink Gallery

    How the Digital Humanities are using Slack to support and build a geographically dispersed intellectual community.

How the Digital Humanities are using Slack to support and build a geographically dispersed intellectual community.

Slack is a web platform aimed at improving team communication and offers some promising features for academic communities. Amanda Visconti shares the experiences of the Digital Humanities Slack. With chat rooms organised by theme, users share resources with colleagues, discuss specific theories or projects, and find out more about what people are working on. With a code of conduct in […]

  • books chains
    Permalink Gallery

    Developing SocArXiv — a new open archive of the social sciences to challenge the outdated journal system.

Developing SocArXiv — a new open archive of the social sciences to challenge the outdated journal system.

While STEM disciplines have developed a number of mechanisms to challenge the time-lags and paywalls of traditional academic publishing, options in the social sciences remain few and far between. Philip Cohen of the University of Maryland argues a cultural shift is taking place in the social sciences. He introduces SocArxiv, a fast, free, open paper server to encourage wider open […]

  • Book-Review-Solidarity-Without-Borders-image
    Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Solidarity Without Borders: Gramscian Perspectives on Migration and Civil Society Alliances edited by Óscar García Agustín and Martin Bak Jørgensen

Book Review: Solidarity Without Borders: Gramscian Perspectives on Migration and Civil Society Alliances edited by Óscar García Agustín and Martin Bak Jørgensen

Solidarity Without Borders: Gramscian Perspectives on Migration and Civil Society Alliances, a contribution to the ‘Reading Gramsci’ series, draws upon Gramscian theories to help understand processes of solidarity-building between civil society and various migrant groups across Europe. Rana Sukarieh welcomes this book, edited by Óscar García Agustínand Martin Bak Jørgensen, for demonstrating the continued relevance of Gramci’s theories for considering coalitions […]

July 10th, 2016|Book Reviews|0 Comments|
  • advisory board featured
    Permalink Gallery

    Announcing the LSE Impact Blog Advisory Board – influential leaders from across the scholarly community.

Announcing the LSE Impact Blog Advisory Board – influential leaders from across the scholarly community.

To ensure the Impact Blog continues to grow in productive directions, a new Advisory Board has been established to help guide the blog as we seek to build an inclusive community around the impact of academic work. Sierra Williams announces the LSE Impact Blog Advisory Board, an esteemed selection of members from across the scholarly community.

The LSE Impact Blog is […]

July 4th, 2016|LSE Comment|2 Comments|
  • 3d sculputures
    Permalink Gallery

    Visualising data in 3D: Handling complexity through visceral and tactile experiences of data.

Visualising data in 3D: Handling complexity through visceral and tactile experiences of data.

Data visualisation can be hugely effective in showing where we are in the world today and in context. Jonathan Minton has been exploring the application and potential of 3D printing for engaging with research. But with these new emerging opportunities for the presentation of data we must not do away with the complexity. Rather, visual, visceral and tactile experiences […]

  • Surveillance-camera featured
    Permalink Gallery

    Internet freedom for all: Public libraries have to get serious about tackling the digital privacy divide.

Internet freedom for all: Public libraries have to get serious about tackling the digital privacy divide.

Democratic engagement depends on critique and dialogue. Ian Clark looks at emerging issues related to digital literacy, online privacy and surveillance. Not only is a security divide emerging between those with digital knowledge and skills to protect themselves and those without, but also an intellectual privacy divide. There is scope for public libraries in the UK to teach the […]

  • Karl_Marx_001
    Permalink Gallery

    Making your Marx in research: Reflections on impact and the efficacy of case studies using the work of Karl Marx.

Making your Marx in research: Reflections on impact and the efficacy of case studies using the work of Karl Marx.

Drawing from a recent study on how impact occurs in the social sciences, Sioned Pearce looks at some specific issues with the case study approach to understanding impact. Viewed alongside the life and works of Karl Marx, the REF’s approach to impact measurement can be seen as highly problematic. Marx’s work was an accumulation of a lifetime of intellectual thought, the […]

  • Symbol,_Johannes_Jansson
    Permalink Gallery

    Gender Gap Extremes: Relational differences, rather than aspirational ones could be major factor in ‘leaky pipeline’

Gender Gap Extremes: Relational differences, rather than aspirational ones could be major factor in ‘leaky pipeline’

The dwindling number of women in senior positions in academia, often referred to as the ‘leaky pipeline’, is particularly apparent in Polish art schools. Anna Gromada, Dorka Budacz, Juta Kawalerowicz and Anna Walewska share findings from recent research shedding light into the more general mechanisms that generate the gender gap in academia and beyond. Crucial differences were identified in networking and […]

  • citations table 1
    Permalink Gallery

    What are the most-cited publications in the social sciences (according to Google Scholar)?

What are the most-cited publications in the social sciences (according to Google Scholar)?

Drawing on citation data that spans disciplines and time periods, Elliott Green has identified the most cited publications in the social sciences. Here he shares his findings on the 25 most cited books as well as the top ten journal articles. The sheer number of citations for these top cited publications is worth noting as is the fact that […]

  • VOYAGE UNKNOWN
    Permalink Gallery

    Selling impact: How is impact peer reviewed and what does this mean for the future of impact in universities?

Selling impact: How is impact peer reviewed and what does this mean for the future of impact in universities?

Despite a wealth of guidance from HEFCE, impact evaluation in the run-up to REF2014 was a relatively new experience for universities. How it was undertaken remains largely opaque. Richard Watermeyer and Adam Hedgecoe share their findings from a small but intensive ethnographic study of impact peer-review undertaken in one institution. Observations palpably confirmed a sense of a voyage into the unknown. […]

May 5th, 2016|Impact|1 Comment|
  • Banksy_Child_with_Hammer_NYC
    Permalink Gallery

    Taking Culture Seriously: How can we build positive change and coherent practice within our research communities?

Taking Culture Seriously: How can we build positive change and coherent practice within our research communities?

Change in higher education often progresses slowly. If scholars are serious about wanting to change disciplinary and institutional cultures and not merely to wait for Cultural Change to magically happen, Cameron Neylon argues we need to consider the differing approaches to how certain cultures operate, interact and eventually change. Ultimately, change in higher education requires a variety of levers […]

  • Language_learning
    Permalink Gallery

    With language studies in decline, we need a relevant and integrated approach to foreign languages in the classroom.

With language studies in decline, we need a relevant and integrated approach to foreign languages in the classroom.

There has been a rapid decline in the number of university language departments since the early 2000s. Michael Tavares provides wider context on the state of language teaching and learning in Britain and looks in particular at how universities might boost the relevance of language studies in other degree programmes. By incorporating language exercises and materials for specific purposes, the teaching of foreign […]

  • tcd
    Permalink Gallery

    ‘We need to speak about race’: Examining the barriers to full and equal participation in university life

‘We need to speak about race’: Examining the barriers to full and equal participation in university life

Looking to examine and address the barriers facing black and minority ethnic academic staff, the LSE is funding a project entitled ‘Race in the Academy’ investigating why so few black and ethnic minority academics are attracted to the LSE and why it struggles to retain black and ethnic minority academic staff. The project is led by Caroline Howarth and Akile Ahmet. […]

  • bayeaux taperstry
    Permalink Gallery

    “Tenure can withstand Twitter”: We need policies that promote science communication and protect those who engage.

“Tenure can withstand Twitter”: We need policies that promote science communication and protect those who engage.

In the age of social media, the professor’s podium has expanded. Cassidy R. Sugimoto argues so too must our policies on science communication and academic freedom. Academic freedom is a right for unfettered freedom to research, but also with an obligation to disseminate that research. Twitter and other social media can be used to fulfill this obligation. What we need […]

  • AWI-core-archive_hg
    Permalink Gallery

    Political History in the Digital Age: The challenges of archiving and analysing born digital sources.

Political History in the Digital Age: The challenges of archiving and analysing born digital sources.

The vast bulk of source material for historical research is still paper-based. But this is bound to change. Dr Helen McCarthy considers the lessons from the Mile End Institute’s conference on Contemporary Political History in the Digital Age. The specific challenges of using a ‘born digital source’ is an area that requires considerable attention. For political historians, the advent of […]

This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.