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    Building bridges in development: Five recommendations to connect the islands of research, policy and practice.

Building bridges in development: Five recommendations to connect the islands of research, policy and practice.

Elizabeth Harrison, Eleanor Jew, Thomas Smith,Iqbal Ahmed and Sarah Peck present the recommendations from a recent conference for early-career researchers on bridging the gap in development research, policy and practice. Participants were encouraged to consider partnership-based solutions to development problems. From having a realistic understanding of intended outcomes to formulating relevant research questions, constructive debate took place on how […]

Identity in the Digital Age: Reading List for #LSELitFest

Join us this weekend for a free event on Digital Personhood and Identity as part of the LSE Literary Festival. Panellists Luke Dormehl (@lukedormehl), Andrew Murray (@AndrewDMurray), Aleks Krotoski (@aleksk), and Sonia Livingstone (@Livingstone_S) will be presenting a mixture of research and reflection, each exploring what affect our digital landscape and our digital lives have on the foundations of our identity. The […]

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    Five Minutes with Cristóbal Cobo: Redefining Knowledge in the Digital Age.

Five Minutes with Cristóbal Cobo: Redefining Knowledge in the Digital Age.

How has and how will the overload of digital information impact the way that scholars look to absorb, disseminate, and assess new knowledge in journals and beyond? Scholastica’s Danielle Padula interviews Cristóbal Cobo of the Oxford Internet Institute on how technology is shaping the research and publishing process for the modern scholar.

How do you think the internet is changing the way […]

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    Book Review: Feminism, Gender, and Universities: Politics, Passion and Pedagogies by Miriam E. David

Book Review: Feminism, Gender, and Universities: Politics, Passion and Pedagogies by Miriam E. David

Feminism, Gender, and Universities celebrates the way in which feminism has forever changed the terrain of higher education whilst examining the impact that the movement has had on the lives of women engaged in teaching others, writes Katherine Williams.

This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books.

Feminism, Gender, and Universities: Politics, Passion and Pedagogies. Miriam E. David. Ashgate. 2014.

Find this book: 

With Feminism, […]

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    The researcher’s guide to literature: Visualising crowd-sourced overviews of knowledge domains.

The researcher’s guide to literature: Visualising crowd-sourced overviews of knowledge domains.

Given the enormous amount of new knowledge produced every day, keeping up-to-date on all the literature is increasingly difficult. Peter Kraker argues that visualizations could serve as universal guides to knowledge domains. He and colleagues have come up with an interactive way of automating the visualisations of entire fields along with relevant articles. Through similarity measures identified in a Mendeley-powered data-set, a researcher can see the […]

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    Book Review: Father and Daughter: Patriarchy, gender and social science by Ann Oakley

Book Review: Father and Daughter: Patriarchy, gender and social science by Ann Oakley

For many aspiring young female sociologists, Ann Oakley’s writing has been inspirational and reassuring. Her new book explores her own life and that of her father, Richard Titmuss, a well-known policy analyst and defender of the welfare state, to offer an absorbing view of the connections between private lives and public work. Essential reading, finds Sally Brown.

This review originally appeared on […]

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    The research-teaching nexus is taken for granted, but not well-understood or developed in practice.

The research-teaching nexus is taken for granted, but not well-understood or developed in practice.

Volha Piotukh and Simon Lightfoot look at the links between research and teaching in Politics and International Relations and find they are not as visible as one would expect, in part due to them being insufficiently developed institutionally. While departments/schools of the Russell Group universities explicitly discussed the research-teaching nexus, very few of the individual departments demonstrated a variety […]

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    Emma Uprichard: Most big data is social data – the analytics need serious interrogation

Emma Uprichard: Most big data is social data – the analytics need serious interrogation

In the final interview in our Philosophy of Data Science series, Emma Uprichard, in conversation with Mark Carrigan, emphasises that big data has serious repercussions to the kinds of social futures we are shaping and those that are supporting big data developments need to be held accountable. This means we should also take stock of the methodological harm present in many big […]

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    What is the difference between ‘doing Digital Humanities’ and using digital tools for research?

What is the difference between ‘doing Digital Humanities’ and using digital tools for research?

Tara Thomson shares her experience attending a participant-driven ‘unconference’ for digital humanities students and scholars. The event format aims to be democratic, aligned with how the Digital Humanities has aimed to build itself on devolved authority. But disciplinary knowledge is not always equally shared. The discussions highlighted problems of access and exclusion as primary concerns for the field. Some felt excluded from the Digital Humanities as […]

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    Introduction to Open Science: Why data versioning and data care practices are key for science and social science.

Introduction to Open Science: Why data versioning and data care practices are key for science and social science.

A significant shift in how researchers approach their data is needed if transparent and reproducible research practices are to be broadly advanced. Carly Strasser has put together a useful guide to embracing open science, pitched largely at graduate students. But the tips shared will be of interest far beyond the completion of a PhD. If time is spent up front thinking about file […]

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    Book Review: Enhancing the Doctoral Experience: A Guide for Supervisors and Their International Students

Book Review: Enhancing the Doctoral Experience: A Guide for Supervisors and Their International Students

This an excellent, thoughtfully-produced pragmatic guide to the very fine and complicated art of doctoral supervision across cultures, writes Casey Brienza. 

This review originally appeared on LSE Review Books.

Enhancing the Doctoral Experience: A Guide for Supervisors and Their International Students. Steve Hutchinson, Helen Lawrence, and Dave Filipović-Carter. Gower/Ashgate. 2014.

Find this book: 

It was with tremendous anticipation that I received Enhancing the Doctoral […]

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    Reference rot in web-based scholarly communication and link decoration as a path to mitigation

Reference rot in web-based scholarly communication and link decoration as a path to mitigation

The failure of a web address to link to the appropriate online source is a significant problem facing scholarly material. Martin Klein and Herbert Van de Sompel together with their collaborators have investigated the extent of reference rot on scholarly domains and their results show an alarming link rot ratio. The authors also explore ways to mitigate it through more systematic […]

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    “Brain Study Confirms Gender Stereotypes”: How science communication can fuel modern sexism.

“Brain Study Confirms Gender Stereotypes”: How science communication can fuel modern sexism.

The way much research on sexual differentiation is conducted and communicated has come under intense criticism from scholars in both the natural and social sciences. Cliodhna O’Connor describes how traditional gender stereotypes are projected onto scientific information and its subsequent reporting. But the dynamics of online spaces have also facilitated more nuanced debate about the social implications of research, and […]

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