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    Women’s working lives in the managerial university and the pernicious effects of the ‘normal’ academic career.

Women’s working lives in the managerial university and the pernicious effects of the ‘normal’ academic career.

University faculties need to be able to demonstrate to young people, male and female, that women can be just as inspiring teachers and researchers, and be able to live as enjoyable a domestic life as their male counterparts. Angela McRobbie reflects on how the ideal career track in the academy, suffused with constant benchmarking around ‘excellence’ and the REF’s logic […]

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    Opening-up the early stages of research: new journal RIO to publish research proposals.

Opening-up the early stages of research: new journal RIO to publish research proposals.

Research Ideas & Outcomes (RIO) is the latest scholarly journal seeking to fix the broken scientific publishing system. It has been created specifically to enable and encourage the entire research cycle to be published, including research proposals and ideas. Founding editor Ross Mounce outlines what the journal seeks to achieve and how it will speed up the publishing process by eliminating […]

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    A ‘contributions’ approach to impact: The influential role of research users in facilitating wider outcomes.

A ‘contributions’ approach to impact: The influential role of research users in facilitating wider outcomes.

Research users are not passive recipients of knowledge, but engage with research from their own perspectives. Sarah Morton has been working in knowledge exchange since 2001 and has recently published a framework for assessing research impact based on contribution analysis. Here she talks about how her approach not only provides impact analysis, but helps improve knowledge exchange with a […]

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    How should academics in the field of migration studies respond to the crisis in Calais?

How should academics in the field of migration studies respond to the crisis in Calais?

Bridget Anderson writes that viewing the crisis as a ‘migration problem’ misses the full picture: namely that those stuck in Calais are a symptom of a wider problem encompassing wars on the edges of Europe, an unequal economic system and the legacy of Europe’s colonial history. One way researchers can respond is by thinking about migration as a lens as well […]

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    The origins of disciplines: Returning to an era of ‘infradisciplinarity’ to build solid intellectual foundations

The origins of disciplines: Returning to an era of ‘infradisciplinarity’ to build solid intellectual foundations

Without appealing to hierarchy and tradition, how might we start a root-and-branch conversation to establish academic criteria for what disciplines, units and structures to keep, and what to kill? Thinking in a serious way about how knowledge production should be organised requires setting aside the rankings charts and becoming acquainted with the origins of scholarly research and higher education […]

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    Was the REF a waste of time? Strong relationship between grant income and quality-related funding allocation.

Was the REF a waste of time? Strong relationship between grant income and quality-related funding allocation.

If the funding allocated to universities on the basis of the REF is correlated to the amount of grant income universities already receive, what is the point of the output assessment process? Jon Clayden explores the relationship between grant income generated and REF-related QR funding and finds a strong correlation between the two, suggesting that the double-counting exercise is surely not the best we […]

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    Stop shielding early-career researchers from open access – limiting wider involvement won’t change a broken system.

Stop shielding early-career researchers from open access – limiting wider involvement won’t change a broken system.

The competitive nature of scholarship and the precariousness of academic employment is what currently hinders early-career researchers, not open access publishing. Rather than warning researchers of the dangers of confronting outdated and proprietary forms of scholarship, all should be engaged in questioning the practices that perpetuate the broken system, argues Samuel Moore.

One of the frequently voiced criticisms of open-access […]

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    Permission to tweet? The underlying principles of good science communication are all about sharing.

Permission to tweet? The underlying principles of good science communication are all about sharing.

Terry Wheeler was at the 100th annual conference of the Ecological Society of America last week. Alongside community shifts towards openness, the rise of Twitter has led to a huge shift in the way science is shared. But with little explanation from the organisers, a confusing opt-in policy for live-tweeting was implemented. Social media is one of the most powerful tools scientists […]

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    The Historian’s Altmetrics: How can we measure the impact of people in the past?

The Historian’s Altmetrics: How can we measure the impact of people in the past?

How can historians measure the influence of intellectual contribution over time? Scraping from online catalogs and employing a range of digital humanities tools, Michelle Moravec looks at women’s liberation scholarship and explores the relationships between authors and essays. It is important to critically examine why certain contributions appear in our web searches and others do not. In particular, she ponders […]

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    Actions speak louder than words: Adaptive non-verbal communication is a key leadership skill for collaborative teams.

Actions speak louder than words: Adaptive non-verbal communication is a key leadership skill for collaborative teams.

Non-verbal communication is extremely influential in interpersonal encounters, and knowing how to leverage non-verbal signals effectively can be a key leadership skill. Connson Locke shares her research findings that suggest displaying an overly-confident and authoritative non-verbal communication can have a damaging effect on a team’s sharing of information and collaboration.

This piece originally appeared on British Politics and Policy.

It is widely accepted that […]

Vacancy: Managing Editor, LSE Review of Books

Our sister blog, LSE Review of Books is currently recruiting for the position of Managing Editor. This is a great opportunity to join our team! The Communications Division at LSE is seeking a highly motivated and enthusiastic individual with experience working with academic writing and a keen interest in the social sciences to work as the Managing Editor of […]

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    Book Review: Non-Governmental Organizations, Management and Development, 3rd Edition

Book Review: Non-Governmental Organizations, Management and Development, 3rd Edition

In the Third Edition of Non-governmental Organizations: Management and Development, author David Lewis argues that while management theory and practice have received attention in businesses and government they remain understudied in NGOs. Chandni Singh finds this edition to fill a significant gap of understanding how NGOs function and are managed in an increasingly complex global environment.

This review originally appeared on LSE […]

August 9th, 2015|Book Reviews|0 Comments|
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    Five things I learned when my research went viral — A little science communication training goes a long way.

Five things I learned when my research went viral — A little science communication training goes a long way.

With a growing number of mechanisms for research to reach the public, there is always a chance that your study may unexpectedly ‘go viral’. Heidi Appel of the University of Missouri-Columbia discusses the process of how her study was picked up and carried across traditional media news cycles and the unexpected directions in which the research was taken. She offers some practical tips […]

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    Science on Television: Despite tensions, the potential of visual narrative and scientific storytelling is enormous.

Science on Television: Despite tensions, the potential of visual narrative and scientific storytelling is enormous.

Is a television programme the format least suited to the communication of complex scientific ideas? Clara Florensa, Oliver Hochadel and Carlos Tabernero discuss a conference that brought TV producers and theorists together to engage constructively on the topic. Simplification, trivialization and even distortion are the accusations regularly levied against science on screen. But this view misinterprets communication as a top-down process, when in reality, […]

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    Why did REF2014 cost three times as much as the RAE? Hint: It’s not just because of the added impact element.

Why did REF2014 cost three times as much as the RAE? Hint: It’s not just because of the added impact element.

The benefits of any research assessment framework should ideally outweigh the costs and burden incurred by universities and staff. Derek Sayer argues there should be cause for concern now that recent analysis shows the 2014 REF bill was three times as much as the last UK assessment exercise. The costly increase in staff time was driven by the increased importance […]

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    Doing things differently: By embracing the politics of Higher Education, academics can help create a better system.

Doing things differently: By embracing the politics of Higher Education, academics can help create a better system.

With higher education in constant flux around the latest assessment exercise, to what extent are academics and administrators ‘hitting the target and missing the point’? John Turnpenny discusses the critical role of the arts and humanities and the grudging acceptance of the linear-rational model for evidence-based decision-making. He argues that by acknowledging that higher education policy is something we help create, rather than […]

This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.