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    85% of Health Research is Wasted: How to do great research, get it published, and improve health outcomes.

85% of Health Research is Wasted: How to do great research, get it published, and improve health outcomes.

Trish Groves reflects on the scandal of waste, error, and misconduct in clinical and public health research and describes a new effort to tackle research and publication integrity from both ends. This challenge matters everywhere, but it’s specially urgent in low and middle income countries. The University of California, San Francisco and BMJ have teamed up to develop an eLearning programme for […]

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    Research Resilience: Why academics and funders alike should care about #RIPTwitter

Research Resilience: Why academics and funders alike should care about #RIPTwitter

Twitter is under close scrutiny these days with news that its timeline could be subject to further algorithmic control. Farida Vis looks at what such dramatic changes could mean for research. There is a great need for both funding councils and researchers to better understand the potential impact of these data and platform politics. Strategies must be developed to encourage lesser reliance […]

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    Challenging the print paradigm: Web-powered scholarship is set to advance the creation and distribution of research.

Challenging the print paradigm: Web-powered scholarship is set to advance the creation and distribution of research.

Our containers for scholarly works – papers, monographs, PDFs – are anachronistic. Marcus A. Banks argues the Web is flexible enough to facilitate far more opportunities for scholarship in a way that print could never do. A print piece is necessarily reductive, while Web-oriented scholarship can be as capacious as required. He highlights three innovations in particular that are set to transform […]

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    Should you #DeleteAcademiaEdu? On the role of commercial services in scholarly communication.

Should you #DeleteAcademiaEdu? On the role of commercial services in scholarly communication.

Reflecting on the recent surge of criticism about the commercial motives of scholarly social media platform Academia.edu, Paolo Mangiafico argues this is now an ideal opportunity for scholars to make informed choices about their work. If you are comfortable with the trade-offs and risks, and willing to exchange those for the service provided, then don’t #DeleteAcademiaEdu. But consider whether alternatives exist that will meet […]

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    Write As If You Don’t Have the Data: The benefits of a free-writing phase.

Write As If You Don’t Have the Data: The benefits of a free-writing phase.

When researchers reach the point of actually writing up their analyses, the writing can often centre around the data itself. Howard Aldrich argues this kind of “data first” strategy to writing goes against the spirit of disciplined inquiry and also severely limits creativity and imagination. Literature reviews and conceptual planning phases in particular would benefit if researchers explored the range of ideas […]

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    Conversing with ghosts: Prefigurative talk and the shifting contours of intellectual debate.

Conversing with ghosts: Prefigurative talk and the shifting contours of intellectual debate.

Next in our #AcWri2016 series is a reflection on conversational writing and academic thought. Academic discussion typically appears as clustered conversations. Davina Cooper focuses on the dilemma posed by prefigurative contributions, where academics respond to a discussion as if it is taking place, treating it as if it were the one that ought to be taking place, even though speakers know the […]

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    Q+A with Bonnie Stewart: “We are part of a society and an academy where the personal/professional divide is blurring”

Q+A with Bonnie Stewart: “We are part of a society and an academy where the personal/professional divide is blurring”

LSE’s NetworkED seminar series for 2016 kick starts this Wednesday (20 January) with Bonnie Stewart. Here she provides a brief look into her research on scholarly identities and how relatively open social spaces like Twitter can be used by scholars for immersive professional development. But, she notes, this space is not without risks. The session will be streamed live and can […]

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    The politics of science funding: We need to think about science and knowledge production in a more practical light

The politics of science funding: We need to think about science and knowledge production in a more practical light

Government funding of science has become an increasingly prominent issue in the United States. Examining the current debate and its consequences, Arne L. Kalleberg interviews Gordon Gauchat about his recent article, “The Political Context of Science in the United States: Public Acceptance of Evidence-Based Policy and Science Funding.”

How might your study help us understand the current political debate in […]

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    Book Review: The Two Degrees Dangerous Limit for Climate Change: Public Understanding and Decision Making

Book Review: The Two Degrees Dangerous Limit for Climate Change: Public Understanding and Decision Making

In The Two Degrees Dangerous Limit for Climate Change: Public Understanding and Decision Making, Christopher Shaw explores environmental policymaking by focusing on the public circulation of 2°C as the widely cited maximum figure by which temperatures can be allowed to rise. Derek Wall praises the book for combining natural science and social science to offer a well-researched and provocative interrogation of […]

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    Human intuition is essential to science: Why metrics will not improve scientific governance

Human intuition is essential to science: Why metrics will not improve scientific governance

Scientists not only rely on knowledge reflected in textbooks and papers, but on their intuitions and experience. Answering scientific questions requires imagining what might be the case and then exploring it. Eric Giannella argues the uncertainty of science makes intuition and judgement essential. Yet the effect of metrics is to reduce the role of judgment. Even the most sophisticated set of […]

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    Why we need a hub for software in science: Research software developers deserve wider academic recognition.

Why we need a hub for software in science: Research software developers deserve wider academic recognition.

Jure Triglav looks at how software recognition, credit and discovery is a massive problem facing the scientific community. Though instrumental to scientific innovation, software creation and maintenance is rarely recognised. By building a hub for research software, scientists could shine a spotlight on its developers and show the extent, importance and impact of their work. Enter Depsy – a new research […]

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    Who’s afraid of Open Data: Scientists’ objections to data sharing don’t stand up to scrutiny.

Who’s afraid of Open Data: Scientists’ objections to data sharing don’t stand up to scrutiny.

Many scientists are still resisting calls to openly share underlying data. Whilst their concerns should be taken seriously, Dorothy Bishop doesn’t think the objections withstand scrutiny. Concerns about being scooped are frequently cited, but are seldom justified. If we move to a situation where a dataset is a publication, then the original researcher will get credit every time someone else uses […]

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    Sound evidence on Human Rights – podcast exploring new perspectives on advocacy and cutting-edge research.

Sound evidence on Human Rights – podcast exploring new perspectives on advocacy and cutting-edge research.

On International Human Rights Day, Todd Landman describes the launch of a new podcast series. The podcast has a simple aim: to provide sound evidence on human rights in an accessible format. Human rights scholarship has advanced tremendously in the late 20th and early 21st century. The podcast format allows the listener to engage with human rights research differently. You will […]

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    Can social science still be used as a foundation for public policy? On improving the reliability of evidence.

Can social science still be used as a foundation for public policy? On improving the reliability of evidence.

John Jerrim and Robert de Vries argue a radical overhaul is needed of how social science is published and produced for it to provide a helpful basis for public policy. More progress is needed in particular over the lack of transparency of the research process, publication bias for positive findings and improved quality assurance mechanisms for peer review.

Governments have started to wake […]

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    Bringing together bibliometrics research from different disciplines – what can we learn from each other?

Bringing together bibliometrics research from different disciplines – what can we learn from each other?

Currently, there is little exchange between the different communities interested in the domain of bibliometrics. A recent conference aimed to bridge this gap. Peter Kraker, Katrin Weller, Isabella Peters and Elisabeth Lex report on the multitude of topics and viewpoints covered on the quantitative analysis of scientific research. A key theme was the strong need for more openness and transparency: transparency in research […]

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Essential Guide: Eight ways research gets into Parliament

Discussions about research and policy have a tendency to be more reflective about policy-making in general, rather than focusing on the more practical aspects of how research filters through a variety of networks and into policy discussions. Sarah Foxen looks at eight specific ways research currently gets into Parliament and provides some helpful links on where to start to get more involved.

I recently attended […]

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    Standing on the shoulders of the Google giant: Sustainable discovery and Google Scholar’s comprehensive coverage.

Standing on the shoulders of the Google giant: Sustainable discovery and Google Scholar’s comprehensive coverage.

The 11th anniversary of Google Scholar passed yesterday. Max Kemman provides an overview of the growth and impact of the platform and also looks at why Google Scholar is virtually unrivaled. The scholarly community might ask whether it is entirely desirable that Google plays such an important role in the scholarly workflow. Not only does Google Scholar have a known effect on discovery and citation […]

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    Meetings can be a waste of time: Seven strategies to get the most out of your meetings and discussions.

Meetings can be a waste of time: Seven strategies to get the most out of your meetings and discussions.

One of the main sources of frustration and boredom in the workplace is unnecessary meetings. And yet meetings remain a central component of intellectual communication, departmental strategy and academic committee structures. Geoff Mulgan suggests seven ways to improve meetings, based on systematic research and experience.

Many of us spend much of our time in meetings and at conferences. But too often […]

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    101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication: How researchers are getting to grip with the myriad of new tools.

101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication: How researchers are getting to grip with the myriad of new tools.

There has been a surge of new scholarly communication tools in recent years. But how are researchers incorporating these tools into their research workflows? Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer are conducting a global survey to investigate the choices researchers are making and why. Insights from these surveys will be valuable for libraries, research support, funders, but also for researchers themselves.

Are we […]

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    Top ten tips for getting your research the attention it deserves

Top ten tips for getting your research the attention it deserves

Altmetrics offer a record of the wider attention and engagement that academic work generates and these broad indicators can provide a helpful starting point for understanding the influence and impact of your research. Danielle Padula and Catherine Williams provide ten simple steps for researchers looking to boost online engagement and wider attention of academic research.

Authors are facing more competition than ever for funding […]

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