• Permalink Gallery

    From scientists, for scientists, and beyond: a method to develop a comic based on your research

From scientists, for scientists, and beyond: a method to develop a comic based on your research

Scientists are increasingly challenged to communicate their work to broader, more varied audiences. Responding to this imperative, Jan Friesen and Skander Elleuche have developed a method that provides a simple, flexible framework to translate a complex scientific publication into a broadly accessible comic format.

“Even amongst scientists, communication across disciplines is tough. But to communicate scientific findings to the general […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Less than 5% of papers on the use of research in health policymaking tested interventions to see what worked. But those studies reveal a number of strategies for improvement

Less than 5% of papers on the use of research in health policymaking tested interventions to see what worked. But those studies reveal a number of strategies for improvement

Population health policies stand a much better chance of succeeding if they’re informed by research evidence. But what are the best ways of making sure this happens? Danielle Campbell and Gabriel Moore conducted a rapid review of the literature on the subject and found that very few studies actually concerned testing interventions to see whether they worked. Those articles […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    The academic conference is an underexploited space for stimulating policy impact

The academic conference is an underexploited space for stimulating policy impact

Despite often having an explicit policy focus, many academic conferences fail to produce policy briefs or even promote papers that are accessible to those working in policy. Sarah Foxen highlights the rich potential of academic conferences as fantastic sites at which to stimulate and facilitate policy impact, collecting all the academic and policy experts on a topic together in the […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    In a globalised and networked world, what is the unique value a university can bring? Introducing Open Knowledge Institutions

In a globalised and networked world, what is the unique value a university can bring? Introducing Open Knowledge Institutions

Digital ubiquity has disrupted the traditional university model. The internet has shifted the balance of a tension between control and disorder in knowledge production, with many of the opportunities the web brings leading directly to many of the challenges we now need to address. Lucy Montgomery and Cameron Neylon advocate for the idea of universities as Open Knowledge Institutions, […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    For some, borders are now an insurmountable barrier to attending international academic conferences

For some, borders are now an insurmountable barrier to attending international academic conferences

Conference attendance is an important part of an academic’s work, offering opportunities to present and receive feedback on recent research, and also to make new connections and expand professional networks. When deciding whether or not to attend an event, the cost of travel or having an abstract accepted remain the determining factors to many. But for some, as Donald […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    In the era of Brexit and fake news, scientists need to embrace social media

In the era of Brexit and fake news, scientists need to embrace social media

Despite the near-constant clamour to do so, many academics remain understandably reluctant to use social media to communicate their research. But as well as increasing the diversity of the audiences academics reach with their work, Andy Tattersall suggests social media can also serve an important purpose in the present era of Brexit and “fake news”. Social media can promote […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    We need our scientists to build models that frame our policies, not to tell stories that shape them

We need our scientists to build models that frame our policies, not to tell stories that shape them

One of the principal ways in which research can be said to have had an impact on society is when it is judged to have shaped public policy. Storytelling is increasingly presented as an effective way of doing this, with researchers encouraged to construct narratives that point towards a clear “moral”, something to be done. Thomas Basbøll argues that […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    What can interdisciplinary collaborations learn from the science of team science?

What can interdisciplinary collaborations learn from the science of team science?

Teamwork makes the dream work, and for interdisciplinary collaborations there are many lessons to be learned from the science of team science. Suzi Spitzer shares ten such lessons here: start by assembling participants with a variety of social skills, such as negotiation and social perceptiveness; avoid jargon and make sure shared words have shared meaning; and accept that conflict, […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Mastering the art of the narrative: using stories to shape public policy

Mastering the art of the narrative: using stories to shape public policy

There can be little doubt people believe narratives are important and that crafting, manipulating, or influencing them likely shapes public policy. But how does one actually do this? To Michael D. Jones and Deserai Crow, it starts by understanding the component parts of a narrative and configuring those in a way that maximises your chances of success. Setting the […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    There is a large disparity between what people see in social media about health research and the underlying strength of evidence

There is a large disparity between what people see in social media about health research and the underlying strength of evidence

Our social media feeds are full of articles shared by friends and family that make claims about how something can prevent a particular health condition. But how robust is the scientific evidence base underpinning these claims? Noah Haber, Alexander Breskin, Ellen Moscoe and Emily R. Smith, on behalf of the CLAIMS team, report on a systematic review of the state […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    r/ip: why science communicators should mourn the loss of reddit’s Ask Me Anything series

r/ip: why science communicators should mourn the loss of reddit’s Ask Me Anything series

Social news website reddit is home to one of the world’s largest online science communities, r/science. The community ran a popular Ask Me Anything Q&A series that saw hundreds of academics quizzed on their area of expertise by an inquisitive online audience. However, following reddit’s decision to rely solely on its algorithm to surface content to its users, the […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    The right messaging should be the cornerstone of your research communications strategy

The right messaging should be the cornerstone of your research communications strategy

Key to communicating your research successfully is having the right messaging. This will give you the best chance of capturing the attention of important stakeholders, while also ensuring all members of your research team are singing from the same song sheet. Kevin Anselmo offers some pointers on how to put together your message map; beginning with your overarching theme, […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Materiality of Research: can imaginative projects complement (and not displace) more critical research?

Materiality of Research: can imaginative projects complement (and not displace) more critical research?

Can projects of reimagining complement more critical research? Writing in response to comments on her recent work on reimagining the state, Davina Cooper addresses the challenge of developing transformative methods, the value of institutional play in academic research and the relationship these may have to more overtly “critical” accounts.

This version of this post first appeared on LSE Review of Books and […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Software updates: the “unknown unknown” of the replication crisis

Software updates: the “unknown unknown” of the replication crisis

The replication crisis is largely concerned with known problems, such as the lack of replication standards, non-availability of data, or p-hacking. One hitherto unknown problem is the potential for software companies’ changes to the algorithms used for calculations to cause discrepancies between two sets of reported results. Anastasia Ershova and Gerald Schneider encountered this very problem in the course […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    A scientific paper shouldn’t tell a good story but present a strong argument

A scientific paper shouldn’t tell a good story but present a strong argument

A recent Impact Blog post extolled the benefits of using a storytelling approach when writing a scientific paper. However, while such an approach might well make for a compelling read, does providing an arresting narrative come at the expense of the reader’s critical engagement with the paper? Thomas Basbøll argues that the essential “drama” of any scientific paper stems […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Don’t let publication be the end of the story – transforming research into an illustrated abstract

Don’t let publication be the end of the story – transforming research into an illustrated abstract

Publishing research that can be accessed as widely as possible is clearly crucial, but ensuring that research is accessible to similarly large groups of people is an altogether different challenge. The CC BY license, required by many funders when publishing open access, permits users to transform and build upon the licensed content, creating something new and original. Lucy Lambe […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Q&A with Dr Katherine Farrimond, Book Reviews Editor of Feminist Theory journal

Q&A with Dr Katherine Farrimond, Book Reviews Editor of Feminist Theory journal

What is the value of the book review today? Is reviewing a form of critique and conversation particularly well-suited to feminist theory and practice? And what strategies might editors looking to feature more feminist scholarship consider in their work? In this Q&A, LSE Review of Books speaks to Katherine Farrimond about her role as book reviews editor of the journal Feminist […]

Print Friendly

How to design an award-winning conference poster

A good academic conference poster serves a dual purpose: it is both an effective networking tool and a means by which to articulately communicate your research. But many academics fail to produce a truly visually arresting conference poster and so opportunities to garner interest and make connections are lost. Tullio Rossi offers guidance on how to produce an outstanding conference poster, […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Applying the sociological imagination: a toolkit for tomorrow’s graduates

Applying the sociological imagination: a toolkit for tomorrow’s graduates

Given how sociological concepts, theories, and perspectives can be applied to many of the relatively smaller problems of everyday life, such as improving urban spaces or enhancing work and productivity, it’s odd that the majority of sociology done in the UK remains behind closed doors, in lecture rooms, academic libraries, and conference halls. Nick Fox explains how a group […]

Print Friendly
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.