A call to build an impact literate research culture

Last week, Julie Bayley spoke at the 2016 Research Impact Summit, hosted by Knowledge Translation Australia. During her presentation she discussed many of the challenges faced when introducing an impact agenda to the academic community, and how the concept of impact literacy can help. An extended version of the presentation has been made available online, but Julie outlines the key points below.

Consider impact. A […]

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    The organisational contexts in which research with impact is produced: lessons from REF2014

The organisational contexts in which research with impact is produced: lessons from REF2014

What are the organisational contexts in which ‘impactful’ research is produced? Following an empirical analysis of a selection of REF2014 impact case studies, Neil Kellard and Martyna Śliwa discuss the links between impact scores and a variety of important contextual factors. In what might be seen as a challenge to the established hierarchy of HEIs, high scores for research […]

November 24th, 2016|Impact, REF 2014|0 Comments|
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    Surviving work as an academic in the age of measuring impact

Surviving work as an academic in the age of measuring impact

Views that academics can avoid the problems of work and aren’t experienced in the ‘real world’ are wrong, writes Jane Tinkler. Precarious employment, balancing teaching, research and publishing demands and demonstrating impact are very real pressures. Indeed, it is through lasting, trusting partnerships with business that researchers can truly have influence beyond academia.

This piece originally appeared on the LSE Business Review […]

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    Giving evidence in Parliament: how to make yourself known to select committees

Giving evidence in Parliament: how to make yourself known to select committees

Providing evidence to policymakers through select committees is a great way for researchers to influence current policy debates. But if you haven’t done it before, the formality of the task may appear daunting. In the second part of a series on giving evidence in Parliament, Patrick Hanley has compiled thoughts and experiences from several LSE academics and reveals their tips on how […]

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    Book Review: The Creative Citizen Unbound: How Social Media and DIY Culture Contribute to Democracy, Communities and the Creative Economy edited by Ian Hargreaves and John Hartley

Book Review: The Creative Citizen Unbound: How Social Media and DIY Culture Contribute to Democracy, Communities and the Creative Economy edited by Ian Hargreaves and John Hartley

Drawing upon the findings of a 30-month research project, The Creative Citizen Unbound: How Social Media and DIY Culture Contribute to Democracy, Communities and the Creative Economy, edited by Ian Hargreaves and John Hartley, explores the potential of civic-minded individuals to participate in ‘creative citizenship’ by utilising social media and engaging with the creative economy. Although she would have welcomed […]

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    The number behind the number: suggesting a truer measure of academic impact

The number behind the number: suggesting a truer measure of academic impact

The limitations of simple ‘citation count’ figures are well-known. Chris Carroll argues that the impact of an academic research paper might be better measured by counting the number of times it is cited within citing publications rather than by simply measuring if it has been cited or not. Three or more citations of the key paper arguably represent a […]

Giving evidence in Parliament: a how-to guide for academics

Providing evidence to policymakers through select committees is a great way for researchers to influence current policy debates. But if you haven’t done it before, the formality of the task may appear daunting. Patrick Hanley has compiled thoughts and experiences from several LSE academics with their tips on preparing and giving evidence to policymakers. This is part one of a series on giving […]

Researching research: New skills of targeting audiences and networking are now necessary to create impact

Correctly targeting your audience and specifically tailoring outputs to policymakers is key to improving the impact of your research. Sarah Lester explains how building contacts and targeted dissemination of research requires skills outside those traditionally used in academia. Since 2009 the Grantham Institute for Climate Change at Imperial College London has been conducting a case study to provide knowledge about […]

REF nightmares before Christmas

In a moment of frivolity Athene Donald sketched out how a REF committee in a dysfunctional department might pan out. As chair of her own local REF committee she is delighted to say my own  experiences bear no relationship to this sad state of affairs, however complex our discussions may get. It’s been a long time since I’ve visited  the […]

December 20th, 2012|Impact, REF 2014|0 Comments|

Finding the time to blog

Pat Thomson doesn’t have too much time on her hands, and she isn’t trying to be trendy, yet she is finding time to write a blog. Here, she explains how she has altered her schedule to rely on a much more digital world to find time to write her academic blog.   How do you get time to blog and […]

Altmetrics are the central way of measuring communication in the digital age but what do they miss?

Inspired by the push towards altmetrics, Nick Scott sees great potential to better communicate indicators of academic success. But this does constitute impact? Here, he puts forward questions on media mentions, website page hits and the ‘dark stuff’. The LSE Future of Impacts conference in London saw a lively debate on numerous issues. However it was the discussion on altmetrics […]

Efforts to strengthen UK universities will suffer if campaigns ignore their European counterparts

Moves to prove impact have led to a rise in campaign groups in support of public universities and the social sciences across the UK and Europe. Anne Corbett finds a worrying level of insularity in the UK’s organisations and argues that that there is space for a Campaign for European Universities to strengthen the impact of these groups. This post […]

December 13th, 2012|Government, Impact|0 Comments|

A new paradigm of scholarly communications is emerging: A report from the Future of Impact conference

Policymakers and academics agree that the economic or public impact of research can’t be demonstrated through just citations and bibliometrics yet open access publishing, altmetrics and online methods must be further developed before we can rely on them to prove impact. Ernesto Priego reports from last week’s Future of Impact conference. How can alternative digital methods of scholarly assessment maximise […]

December 12th, 2012|Events, Impact|7 Comments|

Calling open access academic book publishers: How authors and publishers could make a modest profit

Reputation, professional copyediting and promotion; academics gain a lot from working with a professional publisher but there’s no need to go it alone to go open access. Martin Weller writes that there are lots of ways to go open access while also making a profit. Now is the time for you to seize the moment and make a small-to-modest profit […]

Five minutes with Andrew Herbert: “The social scientists we could do business with were those who grounded their ideas through field studies, cultural probes and social data”.

Part of PPG’s Impact of Social Sciences project focuses on how academic research in the social sciences influences decision-makers in business, government and civil society. Rebecca Mann talked to Andrew Herbert OBE, former Chairman of Microsoft Research. He explains the value that social scientists can bring to industrial research organisations. You were responsible for bringing social scientists into Microsoft Research […]

December 7th, 2012|Impact|2 Comments|

Universities should sink their resources into publishing partnerships with scholarly societies

Christopher Land writes that a hybrid partnership between the university press and scholarly society would put publishing back under academic control and would produce a more open, and impactful, form of publishing. In UK universities this year, conversations are dominated by the REF. Whether a colleague is ‘REFable’, who has the gold-standard ‘4×4’, or whether x journal is a 2 […]

Leading or following: Data and rankings must inform strategic decision making, not drive them

At yesterday’s Future of Impact conference, Cameron Neylon argued that universities must ask how their research is being re-used, and choose to become the most skilled in using available data to inform strategic decision making. It’s time to put down the Impact voodoo doll and stop using rankings blindly. “Impact” is a word that has gained great power in research policy […]

December 5th, 2012|Impact, Rankings|3 Comments|
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