Book Reviews

In this section you can read reviews of academic books covering the USA, and its continental neighbours, Canada and Mexico. Each weekend we publish two reviews, aiming to cover a wide range of books on all aspects of public policy and politics.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy by Mariana Mazzucato

Book Review: The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy by Mariana Mazzucato

Share this:

In The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy, Mariana Mazzucato explores the concept of value today, showing how value extraction is now more highly rewarded than value creation. This is a meticulous and insightful analysis of value in the economy that will help to reopen the debate into ‘the value of everything’, writes Wannaphong Durongkaveroj.
If you are interested in this book […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Handbook of Gentrification Studies edited by Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips

Book Review: Handbook of Gentrification Studies edited by Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips

Share this:

In the Handbook of Gentrification Studies, Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips bring together contributors to explore different types of gentrification around the world, debate the term’s utility for describing diverse phenomena and consider modes of response. The volume offers a good starting point for understanding the wide-ranging discussions of gentrification, underscores the need to approach it flexibly, comparatively and through […]

Book Review: The Infinite Desire for Growth by Daniel Cohen

Share this:

In The Infinite Desire for Growth, Daniel Cohen offers a historical and philosophical account of the adoption of growth as a principle and goal in economic theory from the Enlightenment to the present day. While the essays at times overlook the specific historical and political contexts in which the concept of growth emerged and developed, the collection is thought-provoking and […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Anti-Social Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy by Siva Vaidhyanathan

Book Review: Anti-Social Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy by Siva Vaidhyanathan

Share this:

In Anti-Social Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy, Siva Vaidhyanathan explores the paradoxically disconnective and antisocial character of social media, with a particular focus on Facebook.  Commendably accessible, this book will benefit anyone looking to understand the social-mediatised world in which we are deeply immersed, writes Ignas Kalpokas.

Anti-Social Media: How Facebook Disconnects Us and Undermines Democracy. Siva Vaidhyanathan. Oxford UP. 2018. […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Nervous States: How Feeling Took Over the World by William Davies

Book Review: Nervous States: How Feeling Took Over the World by William Davies

Share this:

In Nervous States: How Feeling Took Over the World, William Davies examines how feeling has come to reshape our world today, displacing the role historically afforded to reason and dissolving longstanding distinctions between the mind and body, between war and peace. The book provides a timely diagnosis of the contemporary social and political dominance of feelings over facts, writes Lilly […]

Book Review: How Democracy Ends by David Runciman

Share this:

Is democracy in crisis? In How Democracy Ends, David Runciman offers a compelling and convincing account of the state of democracy today, separating clear threats from alarmism in an accessible, well-written and thoughtful book. Sean Kippin recommends this to anyone seeking to understand our current predicament and the future paths for democracy – if any – ahead. 

How Democracy Ends. David Runciman. […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless by Robert Rosenberger

Book Review: Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless by Robert Rosenberger

Share this:

In Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless, Robert Rosenberger explores the growth of ‘hostile architecture’ and reflects on what it suggests about society’s attitudes towards the homelesss as well as our relationship with contemporary design. This short, vivid and novel book serves as a timely reminder that our public spaces are not experienced equally, writes Jon Dean. 

Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless. […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City edited by Neil Smith and Don Mitchell et al

Book Review: Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City edited by Neil Smith and Don Mitchell et al

Share this:

First conceived by Neil Smith and posthumously completed by colleagues, Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City offers a collection of essays exploring the history of protest in New York City. Without suggesting that riots always have immediate, obvious results, the volume shows the physical and cultural effects that 400 years of […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Heat, Greed and Human Need. Climate Change, Capitalism and Sustainable Wellbeing by Ian Gough

Book Review: Heat, Greed and Human Need. Climate Change, Capitalism and Sustainable Wellbeing by Ian Gough

Share this:

In Heat, Greed and Human Need: Climate Change, Capitalism and Sustainable Wellbeing, Ian Gough places climate change at the centre of his discussion of the social dimensions of wellbeing. The book offers important and deep insight into the relationship between climate change and the global capitalist economy, finds Marianne Takle, and explores how the former demands a qualitatively new agenda in order for […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Foundational Economy: The Infrastructure of Everyday Life by The Foundational Economy Collective

Book Review: Foundational Economy: The Infrastructure of Everyday Life by The Foundational Economy Collective

Share this:

In Foundational Economy: The Infrastructure of Everyday Life, The Foundational Economy Collective present a radical new approach to economic and development policy based on ‘the foundational economy’ (FE): the material infrastructure and services that provide the basic requirements of life to all citizens regardless of income and location. John Tomaney welcomes this as a vital contribution to the urgent task of constructing […]

This work by LSE USAPP blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported.