Book Reviews

In this section you can read reviews of academic books covering the USA, and its continental neighbours, Canada and Mexico. Each weekend we publish two reviews, aiming to cover a wide range of books on all aspects of public policy and politics.

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    Book Review: Expanded Visions: A New Anthropology of the Moving Image by Arnd Schneider

Book Review: Expanded Visions: A New Anthropology of the Moving Image by Arnd Schneider

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In Expanded Visions: A New Anthropology of the Moving Image, Arnd Schneider explores the generative potential of experimental film as and through anthropology. Highlighting the significance of meaning-making, affect and formal experimentation in the social sciences, the book is a welcome and eloquent contribution to research on the intersection of anthropology and the arts, writes Sander Hölsgens.

Expanded Visions: A New Anthropology of the […]

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    Book Review: The Public and their Platforms: Public Sociology in an Era of Social Media by Mark Carrigan and Lambros Fatsis

Book Review: The Public and their Platforms: Public Sociology in an Era of Social Media by Mark Carrigan and Lambros Fatsis

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In The Public and their Platforms: Public Sociology in an Era of Social Media, Mark Carrigan and Lambros Fatsis explore the discipline of sociology at a time when public life is increasingly shaped by social media platforms. Published in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, this timely book argues that contemporary interactions between sociology, publics and social media platforms demand […]

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    Book Review: The President Who Would Not Be King: Executive Power Under the Constitution by Michael McConnell

Book Review: The President Who Would Not Be King: Executive Power Under the Constitution by Michael McConnell

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In The President Who Would Not Be King: Executive Power Under the Constitution, Michael McConnell explores presidential power and its limits under the Constitution. Jeffrey K. Tulis gives an overview of the book, and discusses the merits and serious defects of its legalistic approach to presidential power. 

The President Who Would Not Be King: Executive Power Under the Constitution. Michael […]

Book Review: The Creative Underclass: Youth, Race and the Gentrifying City by Tyler Denmead

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In The Creative Underclass: Youth, Race and the Gentrifying City, Tyler Denmead reflects on his role in founding New Urban Arts, an arts and humanities programme primarily for young people of colour in Providence, Rhode Island, using this as a means to critically examine how well-meaning arts organisations can replicate systems of race- and class-based inequalities in the face of gentrification. […]

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    Book Review: The Pay Off: How Changing the Way We Pay Changes Everything by Gottfried Leibbrandt and Natasha de Terán

Book Review: The Pay Off: How Changing the Way We Pay Changes Everything by Gottfried Leibbrandt and Natasha de Terán

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In The Pay Off: How Changing the Way We Pay Changes Everything, Gottfried Leibbrandt and Natasha de Terán offer a new account of the history and workings of payments infrastructures, showing how the movement of money is crucial to understanding financial power today. Offering careful and accessible insight into the basics of payments and intelligent analysis of the Fintech boom, this […]

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    Book Review: How Ten Global Cities Take On Homelessness: Innovations That Work by Linda Gibbs, Jay Bainbridge, Muzzy Rosenblatt and Tamiru Mammo

Book Review: How Ten Global Cities Take On Homelessness: Innovations That Work by Linda Gibbs, Jay Bainbridge, Muzzy Rosenblatt and Tamiru Mammo

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In How Ten Global Cities Take On Homelessness: Innovations That Work, Linda Gibbs, Jay Bainbridge, Muzzy Rosenblatt and Tamiru Mammo explore some of the key challenges faced by urban spaces in tackling homelessness and outline the successes of ten global cities when it comes to addressing its causes and consequences. This book is a valuable resource that not only identifies the […]

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    Book Review: Hate in the Homeland: The New Global Far Right by Cynthia Miller-Idriss

Book Review: Hate in the Homeland: The New Global Far Right by Cynthia Miller-Idriss

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In Hate in the Homeland: The New Global Far Right, Cynthia Miller-Idriss explores the places where the far right recruit young people in communities across the US and around the world. From university campuses and Mixed Martial Arts gyms to clothing stores, online forums and YouTube lifestyle channels, the book examines the physical and virtual spaces in which hate is […]

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    Book Review: Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics by Joyce P. Jacobsen

Book Review: Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics by Joyce P. Jacobsen

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In Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics, Joyce P. Jacobsen provides an overview of feminist economics, exploring how various areas of economics intersect with feminism. Full of rich references, this book is a treasure trove for those embarking on ‘doing’ feminist economics, showing how it can challenge the prevailing dogmas of mainstream economics with multiple approaches, writes Rajshree Bedamatta.

Advanced Introduction to Feminist Economics. Joyce P. […]

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    Book Review: Super Polluters: Tackling the World’s Largest Sites of Climate-Disrupting Emissions by Don Grant, Andrew Jorgenson and Wesley Longhofer

Book Review: Super Polluters: Tackling the World’s Largest Sites of Climate-Disrupting Emissions by Don Grant, Andrew Jorgenson and Wesley Longhofer

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In Super Polluters: Tackling the World’s Largest Sites of Climate-Disrupting Emissions, Don Grant, Andrew Jorgenson and Wesley Longhofer analyse the impact of power plants on climate change, demonstrating the disproportionate role that a small number of major plants play in a nation’s overall CO2 emissions. The book is a valuable read for scholars, students and policymakers interested in discussing climate change, […]

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    Book Review: Easy Living: The Rise of the Home Office by Elizabeth A. Patton

Book Review: Easy Living: The Rise of the Home Office by Elizabeth A. Patton

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In Easy Living: The Rise of the Home Office, Elizabeth A. Patton explores how the status of the home as an intimate space and locus of economic activity is closely tied to the economic, social and cultural transformations of the past century. This accessible and engaging account sheds necessary light on the history of working from home and the vested interests […]

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