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    How legislators use state constitutions to block policy changes they oppose

How legislators use state constitutions to block policy changes they oppose

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Political polarization is now part of the character of much of US politics, with many states enacting policies which reinforce legislators’ ideological views. In new research on state prohibitions on same-sex marriage, Daniel Fay finds that state lawmakers pursued constitutional amendments, despite the policy often already being enshrined in state law. He writes that states were more likely to […]

November 16th, 2017|Daniel Fay, Featured|0 Comments|
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    Taking unilateral action can improve a president’s re-election chances, but it may not be good for the country

Taking unilateral action can improve a president’s re-election chances, but it may not be good for the country

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With Congressional gridlock a now omnipresent force in US politics, recent presidents have often turned to unilateral measures, such as executive orders, to enact policies without Congress. But is taking unilateral action good for a president, and for the country? In new research, Gleason Judd finds that as a form of “showing-off”, taking unilateral action can signal a president’s […]

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    State and local agencies are more effective than the federal government in housing discrimination enforcement

State and local agencies are more effective than the federal government in housing discrimination enforcement

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Discrimination by those selling or renting homes is illegal under the 1968 Fair Housing Act (known as Title VIII), but housing discrimination and segregation in the US have not been eliminated. Federal, state, and local agencies are responsible for enforcing Title VIII, so in which part of government is enforcement most effective? In new research which analyses data from […]

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    Strong partisans trust the political system, but not other people

Strong partisans trust the political system, but not other people

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Do we trust other people just like we trust the political system? For strong party supporters in the US, the answer is a resounding “no”. Drawing on General Social Survey data from between 1972 and 2014, new research by Marc Hooghe and Jennifer Oser shows that strong party supporters have high trust in the political system, but low trust […]

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    Michael McQuarrie on writing for blogs: “The most utility comes from allowing me to think through a problem that is bugging me and then publish something about the result”

Michael McQuarrie on writing for blogs: “The most utility comes from allowing me to think through a problem that is bugging me and then publish something about the result”

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In the wake of Donald Trump’s surprise election victory one year ago, LSE Sociology Associate Professor, Michael McQuarrie wrote on the regional nature of Trump’s win. His blog article, “Trump and the Revolt of the Rust Belt”, which has been viewed over 35,000 times has now formed the basis of a new article in the British Journal of Sociology. […]

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    Strengthening laws which take guns out of the hands of domestic abusers will help prevent future mass shootings.

Strengthening laws which take guns out of the hands of domestic abusers will help prevent future mass shootings.

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Last week a gunman killed 26 and wounded 20 in a Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas. Like many mass shooters, the gunman, Devin Kelley, had a record of domestic abuse. Sierra Smucker writes that the irrefutable link between domestic abuse and mass shootings means that lawmakers now need to focus on new and stronger measures, as well as […]

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    Why Trump’s pull-out of the Paris Agreement may open the door for state Governors to push their own climate action.

Why Trump’s pull-out of the Paris Agreement may open the door for state Governors to push their own climate action.

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In June, President Trump announced that the US would be withdrawing from the Paris Agreement on climate change, prompting some US cities and states to reaffirm their own commitments to the agreement. In new research, Katja Biedenkopf looks at how federal inaction can spur state Governors to push for ambitious policies to mitigate climate change. She cautions that such […]

  • Permalink U.S. Soldiers assigned to 1st Battalion, 41st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, tactically maneuver using concealment during Decisive Action Rotation 16-02 at the National Training Center on Fort Irwin, Calif., Nov. 12, 2015. The Soldiers were part of an operation to assault and seize an enemy stronghold. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Daniel Parrott/Released)Gallery

    Book Review: Disappearing War: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Cinema and Erasure in the Post-9/11 World edited by Christina Hellmich and Lisa Purse

Book Review: Disappearing War: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Cinema and Erasure in the Post-9/11 World edited by Christina Hellmich and Lisa Purse

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In Disappearing War: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Cinema and Erasure in the Post-9/11 World, editors Christina Hellmich and Lisa Purse bring together contributors from across a range of disciplines to explore how depictions of contemporary warfare are frequently shaped by absence, erasure and a hierarchy of grievability. This is a theoretically robust, compelling and intriguing contribution to the ‘aesthetic turn’ […]

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    Book Review: Cultural Politics of Targeted Killing: On Drones, Counter-Insurgency and Violence by Kyle Grayson

Book Review: Cultural Politics of Targeted Killing: On Drones, Counter-Insurgency and Violence by Kyle Grayson

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In Cultural Politics of Targeted Killing: On Drones, Counter-Insurgency and Violence, Kyle Grayson analyses the cultural conditions that have rendered targeted killing a seemingly appropriate, even common-sense, technology of warfare. While its array of insights could at times benefit from further space than permitted in this concise volume, this is an impressive book that will be of great use to those looking to better […]

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    The Cayman conundrum: why is one tiny archipelago the largest financial centre in Latin America and the Caribbean?

The Cayman conundrum: why is one tiny archipelago the largest financial centre in Latin America and the Caribbean?

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Analysing how millions of multinational corporations structure their global ownership chains reveals that Cayman acts as a ‘sink’ offshore financial centre where foreign capital accumulates and data trails often end, writes Jan Fichtner.

Try to guess what the top destination of outward foreign direct investment (FDI) from Brazil is! Could it be the United States as the largest economy in […]

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