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Blog Editor

November 14th, 2014

Best of the Blogosphere: Burkina Faso and the Fall of Blaise Compaore

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Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Blog Editor

November 14th, 2014

Best of the Blogosphere: Burkina Faso and the Fall of Blaise Compaore

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

We have scoured the internet for some of the best comment on the recent uprising in Burkina Faso which led to the end of Blaise Compaore’s 27 years at the helm of the landlocked West African country.

Burkina_hero

In a blog post for the Washington Post entitled Four Reasons Why Burkina Faso’s Long-ruling Dictator Fell, academic Landry Sign points to slow-moving democratisation, extreme popular mobilisation, divided security forces and weak international support as reasons why Blaise Compaore had no choice but to step down.

Popular revolutio may seem romantic and exciting (remember the Arab Spring?), but in the article Burkina Faso: is the Cure More Dangerous Than the Disease for the Guardian newspaper, Simon Allison of the Daily Maverick points out that it often leaves instability in its wake.

Every revolution has its heroes. This BBC news article, The Heroes of Burkina Faso’s Revolution, talks about two men whose actions demonstrate the defiant spirit of national revolt.

In African Arguments, Valerie Arnould argues in Burkina Faso After Compaore – Continuity Through Change that for the West African country to move on, whoever takes over from Mr Compaore will have to address the discontent that has been simmering over the last decade.

And finally, if, before this popular uprising, you did not know much about Burkina Faso. Here’s your opportunity to learn. The Mail and Guardian reveals Ten Things You Did Not Know About Burkina Faso.

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Posted In: Conflict | International Affairs

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