LSE Comment

This section showcases articles from LSE academics, students and alumni which have appeared on EUROPP – European Politics and Policy.

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    Young people exposed to an epidemic have less trust in political institutions for the rest of their lives

Young people exposed to an epidemic have less trust in political institutions for the rest of their lives

What impact will the Covid-19 outbreak have on levels of political trust? Cevat Giray Aksoy, Barry Eichengreen and Orkun Saka find that individuals who experience epidemics in their impressionable years display less confidence in political leaders, governments, and elections for the rest of their lives.
It is widely argued (here, for instance) that the keys to success in dealing with Covid-19 […]

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Do populist parties increase electoral participation?

While many observers view the rise of populism as a negative development for democracy, other authors have suggested populist parties might boost political participation by attracting disaffected citizens who do not normally vote. Drawing on a new study, Arndt Leininger and Maurits J. Meijers find evidence that in Central and Eastern Europe the presence of populist parties is associated […]

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    What past epidemics tell us about public trust in science – and scientists

What past epidemics tell us about public trust in science – and scientists

The Covid-19 pandemic will have major implications for public trust in scientific expertise. But will this effect be positive or negative, and will it affect trust in individual scientists or science more broadly? Cevat Giray Aksoy, Barry Eichengreen and Orkun Saka write that people aged 18 to 25, whose core beliefs are still being formed, are likely to suffer the […]

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    Next Generation EU (NGE): The Commission’s Covid-19 recovery package

Next Generation EU (NGE): The Commission’s Covid-19 recovery package

The European Commission has proposed a €750 billion package of grants and loans to aid the EU’s recovery from Covid-19. Iain Begg explains that much will now depend on whether the proposal can secure the backing of the so called ‘Frugal Four’ of Austria, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden.

‘Solidarity is back’, according to Manfred Weber (leader of the […]

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Who said that Germans have no sense of irony?

On 5 May, Germany’s Constitutional Court ruled that the European Central Bank’s Public Asset Purchasing Programme could be incompatible with the German Constitution. Waltraud Schelkle writes there is a deep sense of irony in the ruling: the German Court questions the legal foundations of the ECB’s independence but is actually prevented from succeeding by the constitutional fortifications of the ECB’s […]

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    Comparing European reactions to Covid-19: Why policy decisions must be informed by reliable and contextualised evidence

Comparing European reactions to Covid-19: Why policy decisions must be informed by reliable and contextualised evidence

How meaningful, reliable and useful are the comparisons being made by the media and politicians of the impact of Covid-19 on different EU member states? Linda Hantrais examines how the value of comparisons for policymaking within the EU can be improved. She argues that analysis of information about the numbers of Covid-19 cases, deaths and policy measures should take […]

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    Europe as ideological resource: How far right parties can benefit from European integration

Europe as ideological resource: How far right parties can benefit from European integration

Far right parties typically oppose the European Union, yet European integration has paradoxically provided the far right with funding, visibility and a higher degree of credibility and respectability. Drawing on the case of the French Rassemblement National, Marta Lorimer explains how the EU may have inadvertently facilitated the success of some of its strongest critics.

Far right parties are strong […]

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    Public demand for technocratic expertise rises in times of crisis. What does this mean for democracy?

Public demand for technocratic expertise rises in times of crisis. What does this mean for democracy?

Independent experts have played a prominent role in the responses of European governments to the Covid-19 outbreak. But while there appears to have been broad public support for the involvement of experts in policymaking during the crisis, are there potential implications for democracy? Drawing on a new book, Eri Bertsou presents five lessons learned from research on technocratic politics […]

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    Can greater central bank accountability defuse the conflict between the Bundesverfassungsgericht and the European Central Bank?

Can greater central bank accountability defuse the conflict between the Bundesverfassungsgericht and the European Central Bank?

Germany’s constitutional court recently ruled that asset purchases conducted by the European Central Bank could be incompatible with the German constitution. As Sebastian Diessner explains, the subsequent rift has prompted calls for greater accountability in ECB decision-making, potentially with representatives from Germany’s central bank, the Bundesbank, being obliged to explain ECB decisions in the Bundestag. He writes that while there […]

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Why inflation is not lurking in the shadows

In a recent op-ed in the FT, economist Stephen Roach suggested a future of stagflation as a combined result of the increasing brittleness of supply chains and the pent-up consumer demand caused by the lockdown. But he is wrong, Bob Hancké suggests. The real world is considerably more complicated.

A few days ago, Stephen Roach, erstwhile of JP Morgan, author […]

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    VE Day and the Covid-19 outbreak: Two historical moments that have shaped the world

VE Day and the Covid-19 outbreak: Two historical moments that have shaped the world

The 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) was marked on 8 May against the backdrop of the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. Effie G. H. Pedaliu writes that much like the end of the Second World War, Covid-19 will constitute a landmark moment, with future historians likely to draw a line between life before and life after the […]

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    Book Review: Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order by Charlie Laderman

Book Review: Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order by Charlie Laderman

On 24 April each year, many communities across the world come together to commemorate the mass killing of the Armenian people of the Ottoman Empire during World War I. Grant Golub reviews Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order, in which Charlie Laderman shows how the US and British responses to the atrocities were intimately tied up with […]

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    New survey evidence: A majority of the British public supports giving permanent residency to frontline health workers

New survey evidence: A majority of the British public supports giving permanent residency to frontline health workers

There have been calls for frontline health workers in the UK to be given permanent residency to acknowledge their role in the fight against Covid-19. Mollie Gerver, Patrick Lown and Dominik Duell present evidence from a new survey which indicates a majority of the British public would support this proposal.

The spread of Covid-19 has led to increasing strains on […]

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    Moral dilemmas in times of crisis: Could Covid-19 lead to a more compassionate form of politics?

Moral dilemmas in times of crisis: Could Covid-19 lead to a more compassionate form of politics?

The Covid-19 outbreak has pushed European healthcare systems to their limits. Those at the frontlines have been forced to make grim decisions about which patients merit treatment and which will have to be turned away. Katerina Glyniadaki asks whether the moral challenges posed by the crisis may ultimately foster a greater sense of compassion and solidarity in European politics.

In […]

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Covid-19: The struggle to agree an EU response

On 23 April, EU leaders directed the European Commission to draft a proposal for an economic rescue plan to mitigate the impact of the Covid-19 outbreak. Iain Begg writes that while the EU is shifting towards a more extensive response to the economic crisis, national sensitivities continue to constrain its ability to act and some will have to concede […]

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    Evidence from France: How crowdfunding is being used to support the response to Covid-19

Evidence from France: How crowdfunding is being used to support the response to Covid-19

The Covid-19 crisis has led to a surge in donation and reward based crowdfunding campaigns aimed at supporting those affected by the pandemic. Drawing on evidence from France, Alix Moine and Daphnée Papiasse assess the extent to which crowdfunding can function as an alternative financial safety net in times of crisis.

There has been an impressive upsurge in the number […]

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    How different will this time be? Assessing the prospects for economic recovery from the Covid-19 crisis

How different will this time be? Assessing the prospects for economic recovery from the Covid-19 crisis

Covid-19 has already generated a sharp fall in global GDP and a rapid rise in unemployment, but what kind of recovery can we expect once the crisis passes? Iain Begg and Jun Qian write that in the most optimistic scenario, the world will experience a return to trend growth once lockdowns are lifted. The more worrying possibilities are that […]

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    Now it’s the turn of EU leaders to do ‘whatever it takes’ to save Europe – or it won’t be enough

Now it’s the turn of EU leaders to do ‘whatever it takes’ to save Europe – or it won’t be enough

The European Council will hold a video conference on the Covid-19 outbreak later today. Sebastian Diessner, Erik Jones and Corrado Macchiarelli write that with European economies under unprecedented strain, it is now time for EU leaders to commit to doing whatever it takes to forestall the crisis.

Everyone is waiting for the ‘whatever it takes’ moment that is going to […]

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Italy’s endgame and the future of the Eurozone

Italy has been one of the hardest hit countries in the world during the Covid-19 outbreak and there are significant concerns about the impact the pandemic will have on the Italian economy. Roberto Orsi writes that the Eurozone is rapidly heading toward a point where it will either have to adopt radical new measures to accommodate countries like Italy […]

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Who pays for the war on Covid-19?

The Covid-19 outbreak has renewed calls for the Eurozone to establish a form of debt mutualisation, potentially via the creation of ‘Coronabonds’. So far, however, there is little sign of such a measure being agreed. Iain Begg writes that it is not ideas or proposals that are lacking at the EU level, but rather an absence of political will to […]

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