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Nadya

March 28th, 2022

How to Get Your Motivation Back

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Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Nadya

March 28th, 2022

How to Get Your Motivation Back

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

At this point Lent Term is in full swing and sometimes the lectures and readings appear to be a bit too long, and the days seem somehow shorter. The end of term is looming over us with a promise of a break, further worsening our motivation levels. It is very tempting to procrastinate and assure yourself that you will definitely have time to catch up on skipped readings and lectures later. Of course, everyone should take breaks from studying and working, but if you are struggling to start, here are a few things that could help:

Make a schedule that works. Figure out what works better for you, whether it’s dedicating an entire day to studying and then taking it easier the next day, or studying a couple of hours consistently each day. Knowing what keeps you productive will make it easier to stay motivated. I personally have noticed that when I have a lot of studying to do, I prefer to have a full day where I do primarily just work. Even if a day is not enough to finish everything, I’ve found it is more reassuring to start working on big assignments without worrying about stopping halfway through because of something else I’ve scheduled for the day. It can be hard to be motivated when you feel pressured by time. If you are more productive when you study a few hours every day, then there is no reason to push yourself to stay in the library for an extra hour when your brain needs a break. In both cases, good planning is required to keep up with deadlines.

 

The new Lower Ground floor (LGF) in the Library

 

Find the right study space. Go to a place where others are also studying (e.g., the library, the Centre Building). Depending on what you are working on, different environments might be more suitable than others. When I am reading or writing a paper I like to be in a quiet place so I usually go to the silent floors in the library, and seeing other people being focused on their work, helps me stay on track with my task. When I am watching recorded lectures or brainstorming/ making an outline for a paper, I prefer busier atmospheres and opt for the seats around the staircase in the Marshall Building because it is a more dynamic environment and motivates me to work faster—quick note-taking is essential if you don’t want to re-watch the lecture several times! Seeing other people tackling their to-do lists, whether in a quiet room or busy open space. could help you feel a spark of motivation of your own. If you are studying in your room, try to trick your brain into being productive. Do not stay in bed and hope for motivation to magically hit you, as we all know that never happens. Making your bed, changing from your pajamas, and sitting on your desk can help trick your brain into feeling some motivation. I also recommend still getting out of your room for a short walk even if your day is busy. Getting some fresh air and giving your brain a break from the constant flow of information, would be more beneficial in the end than staying at your computer the whole day.

Seeing other people tackling their to-do lists, whether in a quiet room or busy open space. could help you feel a spark of motivation of your own.

 

Make a to-do list. I know it sounds very simple, and many already do this, but it is still worth mentioning. Write down what you need to do for the day or week and cross it off once it’s completed. Sometimes the main thing that gets me through an assignment is the thought of putting the checkmark next to it on my list. I would argue that the feeling is almost as good as closing all your tabs after writing a paper. I personally, do not like to carry a lot of things with me, so a physical planner is not something that would help me simply because I would never have it with me. Instead, I use Notion and have it both on my laptop and my phone, which makes it very easy to stay on top of my list.

Studying with someone else can help keep you on track!

 

Find a study buddy. Studying alone can be very boring, and it is easy to end up procrastinating on TikTok, Instagram, or any of the other countless amazing procrastination-enablers we have on our phones. If you and your friend make sure you’re both focused on getting work done, it will be easier to start and keep working.  A word of warning—choose a place where you won’t be tempted to spend the whole study session talking, like a silent floor in the library, for example. Even if you haven’t made friends with anyone in a given class, you can use the Study Abroad Virtual Common Room to find someone who would be interested in studying with you. Your study buddy doesn’t even have to take the same classes you are, as long as you help each other stay motivated—and maybe reward each other with a doughnut for being so productive at the end of the day.

No matter what you choose to try to get your motivation back, make sure to still take breaks. You may have gotten too used to your studying routine and environment and simply need a small change to get your motivation back.

About the author

Nadya

Nadya studies Government and German at Franklin and Marshall College. Originally from Bulgaria, she is now spending one year studying at LSE as a General Course student.

Posted In: Student Life: Advice | Study: Undergraduate

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