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Sarah Schaible

April 19th, 2022

Private housing vs student accommodation – Part II: pros and cons of student accommodation

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Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Sarah Schaible

April 19th, 2022

Private housing vs student accommodation – Part II: pros and cons of student accommodation

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Welcome to Part II of my mini-series on accommodation! You’ve come to the right place if you are deciding whether to stay in private housing or student accommodation next year. This part focuses on the best and worst things about student accommodation. Make sure to refer back to Part I if you are curious about the comparison with private housing.

Student Accommodation Pros

Finding friends is easier

You will inevitably get to know people from the start of your course. This is great at the beginning when you have just moved to London and don’t know anyone in the city yet. Even if your flatmates don’t end up becoming your best friends, it is nice to have people around to have a friendly chat with.

You might have the option to be catered (as an undergraduate)

Unfortunately, this point doesn’t really apply to postgraduate students at LSE, but it is arguably one of the best things about living in student accommodation. It is also something to be considered in the overall cost of living in London.

You have the option of different contract lengths

This also mostly applies to undergraduate halls, but can be a great money-saving option. Even during your master’s, you might decide to move out in June after the end of the exams period. In private accommodation, contracts usually run at least for 12 months.

Less expensive

Prices are usually reasonable for LSE halls. Consider the extra costs that are included, such as utility bills, cleaning and sometimes catering. These will have to be paid on top of the rental price in private housing, though.

Student Accommodation Cons

You might have less personal space, especially if you share a room

This also applies to sharing kitchens and bathrooms. There are options in halls to have more or less private space, but it is definitely something to keep in mind.

There are rules you need to follow

As mentioned in Part I of this series, the Hall might have certain procedures in place. This especially applied during the pandemic. However, it is still mostly up to you how you and your flatmates use the space.

It might be expensive if you want a spacious centrally located room

While I have mentioned the cost-effectiveness of halls, there are a few outliers. Some of the accommodations LSE offers have very high price tags, especially those located closest to the School. Also, the price increases if you want more space for yourself.

Your room will probably be quite small

This depends entirely on personal preference. It hasn’t been an issue for me to have a relatively small room since the storage provided is usually great, but the floor space is certainly limited and can feel slightly cramped at times.

As I mentioned in Part I, there will inevitably be trade-offs implicit in this decision. Depending on what you value most, I suggest making your own pros and cons list and toggling up the points that are most important to you. I hope you find what’s right for you!

About the author

Sarah Schaible

Hi, I'm Sarah! I am an LSE BA Anthropology and Law graduate and a current LLM student.

Posted In: Accommodation

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