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Ragini

August 4th, 2022

How to explore the LSE Campus: My top 4 tips

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Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Ragini

August 4th, 2022

How to explore the LSE Campus: My top 4 tips

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

I did my undergrad at the University of Warwick so the move to a city university was certainly daunting for me. I was used to being in the comfort of a campus environment and I had no idea how I was going to navigate LSE. I remember my biggest concern was how to pass time between classes and lectures. I thought I would have to find the nearest Starbucks and pray it was not overrun by the rest of the students trying to find a place to eat lunch or do a reading. After two terms of classes and one term of revising on campus, I can assure you there is plenty of room on campus to spend time between classes. In fact, in order to keep myself motivated while writing my dissertation, I have decided to keep switching my study spot on campus every week. Nonetheless, it took some time for me to get here so here are my top tips for navigating LSE for anybody who is as intimated as I was before arriving.

  1. LSE may not have a “campus” per se but Lincoln’s Inn Fields to St. Clements Inn are as close to a campus as it gets. The latter, not only does it have multiple LSE buildings including Pethick-Lawrence House which has the St Philips Medical Centre, you walk through it to find John Watkins Plaza. This buzzing spot is like our own little LSE breakroom in the middle of bustling London. It is in the middle of the giant Centre Building and the Lionel Robbins Building, aka the LSE Library, so if you want to show your friends and family where you study, I recommend bringing them here to give them a taste of a day in the life of an LSE student.
  2. LSE has a great location smack dab in the middle of London which makes it very easy to access. Holborn and Temple stations on the tube are closest if you want to use the underground. However, make sure you check if there is a direct bus from where you live to LSE because there are numerous bus stops much closer to various buildings.
  3. The LSE campus map, available online and all over your campus, is going to be your best friend whilst you’re here. Even though the buildings and the campus are something you get used to, I continue to get confused by the various abbreviations that are used for various buildings. The campus map I picked up in the beginning of term has stayed in my bag ever since and even though it is tattered and counting its final breaths, I still refer to it occasionally if I need to attend an event in an obscure LSE building.
  4. Finally, make the most of the fact that you have access to LSE. There is so much to do here with pubs, restaurants, workspaces and relaxation spots all around you. Try spending more time on campus outside of seminars and lectures. If you have to meet a friend for a drink one evening, why not invite them to an LSE pub! While London is an intimidating city, your LSE bubble will make you feel at home right in the middle of this big city.

About the author

Ragini

My name is Ragini and I am a masters student in the department of International History. I am intersted in studying South Asian history, particularly Indian history. I also grew up in Delhi so I love living in London because I feel right at home amidst all the noise and commotion.

Posted In: Campus | Student life

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