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Natallia

November 6th, 2023

Opportunities with the LSE Language Centre

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Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Natallia

November 6th, 2023

Opportunities with the LSE Language Centre

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

The Language Centre at LSE gives you the opportunity to continue language learning alongside your degree. While studying a language at most universities means beginning it at an already high level, LSE allows students from all levels to study it in parallel to your main degree programme. LSE offers courses in a broad range of languages. If you study a language out with your degree, there are nine languages to choose from. If you do the language as part of your degree, you can choose from French, German, Mandarin, Spanish and Russian.

There are multiple ways in which you can study a language. One of the ways is through your “outside option”. In many degree programmes you will be required to take one course (a quarter of your time) from another department. You can choose to study a beginner, intermediate, advanced of proficient course in your chosen language.

Subject to your department’s regulations, if you take the same language each year, at a progressively harder level, you may be able to have the language attached to your degree transcript. You also do not have to apply for this through UCAS. The process is simple: you simply have a conversation with the teacher, who will assess your level and see if you are suited to the course.

I personally find doing a language for my outside option very rewarding. I do Beginner Spanish and plan to continue it for the rest of my degree. Learning a language uses the brain in a very different way to what your degree likely demands. It requires methodical, structured and repetitive learning, whereas my degree programme, BA History, requires more analytical thought. Doing a combination of both provides good balance.

Languages tend to have a lot of more classes than other courses, which is something to bear in mind when deciding whether to do one. This is particularly the case for beginner classes, as they are intensive courses. I have six hours of class each week. I really enjoy having so many contact hours as it allows you really get to know the people in your class. The classes are also very interactive, which can be a refreshing break from the independent work from other courses. It keeps your days varied and interesting.

There are also opportunities to do a non-degree language programme. As the name suggests, these courses do not not count towards your degree. They are done on the side in your free time and provide you with a different certification. These can be a great option if your main degree programme does not permit an outside option, or if you simply do not want the pressure of it counting towards your degree.

Doing a language opens up opportunities for you later on in life. As well as increasing your global communication, the courses teach you a lot about other societies and cultures. LSE have so many international students who speak your chosen language with whom you can practice with. This makes it the perfect time to learn.

About the author

Natallia

I am a first year undergraduate, studying BA History with Spanish. I am involved with many societies, such as the newspaper, netball and yoga. When I am not in the library, I love to explore London and find unusual new places.

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