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Aishwarya

May 16th, 2024

Well-being 101: the application process

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Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Aishwarya

May 16th, 2024

Well-being 101: the application process

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

With application season drawing to a close and the admission process running full-swing behind the scenes, your nerves may start to feel very real. The university application process can be hectic and a bit stressful, so caring for your physical and mental well-being is essential, especially as we draw closer to the final decision.

Here are a few ways to take care of your well-being:

Journalling

If you’re ever feeling overwhelmed, unable to focus, or jumping to conclusions about future events that haven’t yet happened, writing your thoughts down can be beneficial. When you put your thoughts into words, write factually about what’s actually happened, and clearly differentiate these from what your worries about the future are. This will also help to articulate your potential action plans for “worst-case” scenarios. These exercises can help you clear your mind and calm your nerves.

Take a break

In the instance where you’ve completed all steps required for your application process and are in the “waiting” period, you may want to consider taking a break. And whilst you’re on it, truly take time away from the application process — meaning refrain from discussing it with friends and family, as well as constantly checking your emails. Take a “mini-holiday” (if it’s a viable option for you): read a book, binge-watch TV shows, and indulge in self-care. Establish a routine for a few days when you’re on your break and commit to it earnestly. The application process has been stressful, so this time to relax is well-deserved.

Volunteer

Now that you’ve got some time after submitting your application, you could use this period to volunteer for a cause that you’re passionate about. It’ll keep you busy, and you also can meet new people when engaging in social activities. Some volunteering projects last as little as a few weeks, which is perfect since you can set short-term goals and achieve them quickly. The perk with volunteering is that it’s a proven activity to lighten up your mood and make you feel good.

Find a hobby

If you have a hobby that’s taken a back-seat, why not try getting back into it? Or if you’re looking to pick a new hobby, now’s a perfect time! Anything from upcycling and rock climbing, to origami and participating in book clubs, these may provide you some space for fun and new learning. Hobbies can boost your self-confidence, help relieve stress, and provide time to make new friends. You could even consider using your hobby to make some additional income on the side.

Talk to your loved ones

Your friends and family understand that this is a stressful time for you. Remember that they’re genuinely there to support you. Reaching out to them and talking through your worries and anxieties can be a helpful way to manage your stress. Most importantly, connect with your loved ones after a busy application process. If you feel that you may need professional support, don’t be afraid to seek help – starting early is always better than waiting.

Final advice: remember that your application outcome doesn’t necessarily define the entirety of your professional success; you can achieve your goals through several different approaches.

What truly defines your professional success is a healthy appetite for learning with an optimistic outlook.

All the best – you’ve got this!

About the author

Aishwarya

I’m Aish, an MPhil/PhD student at the Department of Psychological and Behavioural Science. I study the impact that personality characteristics can have on performance at the workplace. When I’m not actively PhD-ing, I spend my time cooking, writing, and hula-hooping.

Posted In: Applying: Masters

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