Clive James Nwonka

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Politics of Race in American Film podcast: Episode 3, Class, Gender, and Freedom at the Edges of America

The Politics of Race in American Film podcast: Episode 3, Class, Gender, and Freedom at the Edges of America

Share this:

In this episode of The Politics of Race in American Film, Dr. Clive James Nwonka hosts a conversation with Melanie Hoyes (British Film Institute), Dr. Luisa Heredia (Sarah Lawrence College), and Dr. Shelley Cobb (University of Southampton) about the films American Honey and The Florida Project.

Each film examines the experiences of people on the fringes of American society: for […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The Politics of Race in American Film podcast: Episode 2, Race, Space, and The City

The Politics of Race in American Film podcast: Episode 2, Race, Space, and The City

Share this:

In this episode of The Politics of Race in American Film podcast, Dr. Clive James Nwonka discusses the films Paterson and The Last Black Man in San Francisco with Dr. Suzanne Hall (LSE Sociology) and Dr. Austin Zeiderman (LSE Geography and the Environment). Both films examine the relationships their main characters have with the cities in which they live, […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    Introducing Episode 1 of The Politics of Race in American Film: a new podcast from the LSE US Centre featuring Dr Clive James Nwonka

Introducing Episode 1 of The Politics of Race in American Film: a new podcast from the LSE US Centre featuring Dr Clive James Nwonka

Share this:

The LSE US Centre is excited to introduce our new podcast series, The Politics of Race in American Film, now available on Apple Podcasts, SoundCloud, Spotify and the LSE Player. Hosted by Dr. Clive James Nwonka, over five episodes this podcast will explore what makes film such a powerful lens for understanding race, politics & society.

In Episode 1, “The […]

  • Permalink Gallery

    The protests over George Floyd’s death show how film and culture can be tools of anti-racism, but we must continue to value them beyond this moment.

The protests over George Floyd’s death show how film and culture can be tools of anti-racism, but we must continue to value them beyond this moment.

Share this:

The death of George Floyd while being arrested by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota has led to a renewed wave of #BlackLivesMatter protests both in the US and across the world. Clive James Nwonka looks at why these protests are different this time, how social media have allowed them to spread across the world, and the limitations of film and […]

This work by LSE USAPP blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported.