Democracy and culture

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    Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them edited by Joseph Uscinski

Book Review: Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them edited by Joseph Uscinski

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In Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them, Joseph Uscinski presents a collection that brings together contributors to offer an wide-ranging take on conspiracy theories, examining them as historical phenomena, psychological quirks, expressions of power relations and political instruments. While this is an interesting and expansive volume, writes Max Budra, it overlooks the conundrum posed by conspiracy theories that succeed […]

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    Break up big tech? Make it fairer? Sure, but let’s support our right to refuse what technology companies offer us

Break up big tech? Make it fairer? Sure, but let’s support our right to refuse what technology companies offer us

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With billions of people now members of social media networks such as Facebook and the all-pervasiveness of big tech throughout many aspects of our lives, conversations about digital citizenship have never been more important. Seeta Peña Gangadharan writes that despite efforts by the Obama administration in the late 2000s to improve digital citizenship, the US information economy has now […]

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    Book Review: A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy by Russell Muirhead and Nancy L. Rosenblum

Book Review: A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy by Russell Muirhead and Nancy L. Rosenblum

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In A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy, Russell Muirhead and Nancy L. Rosenblum identify and outline the emergence of a new type of conspiracist thinking in our contemporary moment, showing it to pose a fundamental threat to democratic functioning. While questioning whether the book ascribes too much intentionality to those engaging in ‘the […]

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    Book Review: Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit and Authoritarian Populism by Pippa Norris and Ronald Inglehart

Book Review: Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit and Authoritarian Populism by Pippa Norris and Ronald Inglehart

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In Cultural Backlash: Trump, Brexit and Authoritarian Populism, Pippa Norris and Ronald Inglehart draw on statistical data and a wide literature to make the case that patterns of voting for populist parties across Europe, Brexit in the UK and Donald Trump in the USA all show substantial intergenerational differences. This is a large and ambitious book, but Ron Johnston was less […]

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    British public opinion and UK-US relations: ‘We like you a lot but we don’t much like your president’

British public opinion and UK-US relations: ‘We like you a lot but we don’t much like your president’

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Drawing on cross-national surveys, Ben Clements explains that in recent years the British have expressed high levels of positive sentiment towards the American people, they have been well-disposed towards the US as a country, but have been markedly negative about Trump’s presidency and policies.

The Trump presidency and its promotion of the ‘America First’ agenda, as well as the prospect […]

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    The US shows the unequal world we are heading for – and we don’t seem to care

The US shows the unequal world we are heading for – and we don’t seem to care

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Income inequality is on the rise, a fact which many academics and commentators suggest is an important part of the election of populist figures like Donald Trump. And yet, studies show that people are actually becoming less concerned about inequality as it increases. In new research, Jonathan Mijs describes how inequality has reshaped the social landscape and how, as […]

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    Book Review: Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny by Sarah Banet-Weiser

Book Review: Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny by Sarah Banet-Weiser

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In Empowered: Popular Feminism and Popular Misogyny, Sarah Banet-Weiser engages with popular feminism through the lens of ambivalence, charting both the relatively recent rise of feminism in the public eye, but also exploring the proliferation of its obverse, the force of popular misogyny. Showing how contemporary feminism’s commitment to popularity – defined as an over-reliance on individual striving and a commitment to […]

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    Book Review: How to Save a Constitutional Democracy by Tom Ginsburg and Aziz Z. Huq

Book Review: How to Save a Constitutional Democracy by Tom Ginsburg and Aziz Z. Huq

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In How to Save a Constitutional Democracy, Tom Ginsburg and Aziz Z. Huq focus on the structural forces that can break democratic societies and the role the constitutional system plays in democratic failure as well as its prevention. The book’s clear and engaging approach makes it a valuable contribution to scholarship on democracy and authoritarianism, recommends Lorenzo Canepari.

How to Save a […]

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    Book Review: Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction by Jim Reynolds

Book Review: Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction by Jim Reynolds

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In Aboriginal Peoples and the Law: A Critical Introduction, Jim Reynolds offers an excellent new encapsulation of Canadian Aboriginal law, discussing 163 cases stretching from 1823 up until the present day and covering topics including sovereignty, Aboriginal title and treaties. Reynolds draws on his wealth of experience to provide a compendious summary of the development of Aboriginal law in Canada, writes […]

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    Book Review: The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students by Anthony Abraham Jack

Book Review: The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students by Anthony Abraham Jack

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In The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students, Anthony Abraham Jack seeks to better comprehend the unnoticed heterogeneous experiences of first-generation, low-income students navigating campus life at elite universities in the United States. This is a significant contribution to debates on class and mobility, writes Malik Fercovic, that compels us to think carefully about the responsibilities of […]

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