Justice and Domestic Affairs

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    Police use-of-force policies should be replaced by those based more closely on legal principles

Police use-of-force policies should be replaced by those based more closely on legal principles

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In the United States, many police forces determine how much force to use when dealing with suspects through a continuum which ranks different levels of force based on resistance. In new research which examines more than 700 use of force incidents in one city, Scott M. Mourtgos, Ian T. Adams and Samuel R. Baty find that there is very […]

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    In the early global fight against COVID-19, quick mask mandates were most effective

In the early global fight against COVID-19, quick mask mandates were most effective

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Before the development of an effective vaccine, policymakers had to use other approaches such as mask mandates and stay-at-home orders to slow the spread of COVID-19. In new research covering 164 countries, Brian An, Simon Porcher, Shui-Yan Tang, and Eunji Emily Kim examine the effectiveness of these measures aimed at stopping the spread of COVID-19, finding that mask mandates, […]

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    “Fetal Citizens” or “Anchor Babies”? Explaining reproductive injustice against immigrants and what feminists should do about it  

“Fetal Citizens” or “Anchor Babies”? Explaining reproductive injustice against immigrants and what feminists should do about it  

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In the United States, undocumented immigrant women are often subjected to reproductive injustices, including the denial of abortions. dangerous shackling, non-consensual sterilization, and a lack of medical care. Brittany Leach looks at the far-Right discourses which simultaneously see fetuses as citizens while seeking to punish pregnant undocumented women immigrants. She writes on how the contradictions of these pro-life and […]

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    Supreme Court justices are more likely to borrow language from interest group briefs when it will go unnoticed.

Supreme Court justices are more likely to borrow language from interest group briefs when it will go unnoticed.

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In recent decades, the Supreme Court has been seen as increasingly as a political as well as a legal institution, with justices’ partisan ideologies informing their decision-making. In new research, Kayla Canelo examines how justices reference and cite friend-of-the-Court or amicus curiae briefs from interest groups in their majority opinions. She finds that justices are more likely to borrow […]

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    For some justice system-involved young people, shorter case processing times can reduce their chance of re-arrest

For some justice system-involved young people, shorter case processing times can reduce their chance of re-arrest

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In the US juvenile justice system, the time that young people wait between arrest or referral to the final outcome of their case is largely unregulated. In new research, Abigail Novak and Elizabeth Hartsell examine the effects of case processing time on youth re-arrest rates. They find that context is important: females and low-risk youth on diversion, and detained […]

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    Book Review: Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism by Anne Case and Angus Deaton

Book Review: Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism by Anne Case and Angus Deaton

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In Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism, Anne Case and Angus Deaton document the rising death rates from suicide, drug overdoses and alcoholic liver disease in the US, exploring what these ‘deaths of despair’ reveal about capitalism and the healthcare system. Making a compelling case for exploring these deaths of despair and their implications, this stimulating and thought-provoking book […]

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    Courts in more Republican-leaning counties sentence Black individuals to longer prison terms than White individuals

Courts in more Republican-leaning counties sentence Black individuals to longer prison terms than White individuals

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The United States puts more people in prison than any other country in the world, and Black and Latinx individuals are disproportionately incarcerated and for longer. In new research which examines over 500,000 people admitted to state prisons through county courts, Katherine A. Durante finds that Black and Latinx individuals are sentenced, on average, for longer than White individuals, […]

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    Family prison visits increase the chance of employment after release for those who have served fewer than three prison terms

Family prison visits increase the chance of employment after release for those who have served fewer than three prison terms

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For those who have been incarcerated, employment after release can reduce the likelihood of further criminal activity and a potential return to prison. In new research, Chantal Fahmy and Matthew Gricius examine the impact of prison visits by family members on the likelihood of employment after release. Using survey data, they find that those who were visited by family […]

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    Women who argue in front of the US Supreme Court win just as often as men – but it’s harder for them to get there.

Women who argue in front of the US Supreme Court win just as often as men – but it’s harder for them to get there.

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Over the past 70 years, lawyers have argued cases before the US Supreme Court more than 10,000 times, but just under seven percent of these appearances have been by women. In new research, Jonathan S. Hack and Clinton M. Jenkins find that while over time, women have been no less likely to win a Supreme Court case than men, […]

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    ‘Taxation by citation’ in many US cities does little to protect the public and can compromise individual rights

‘Taxation by citation’ in many US cities does little to protect the public and can compromise individual rights

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Over the past decade many US cities have attempted to fix budgetary holes by raising revenues via enforcing their municipal codes. Dick M. Carpenter II investigates three cities in Georgia which undertake “taxation by citation”. He finds that the budget share of fines and fees were three times higher for these cities than in others, most citations had little […]

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