Society

Burundi under Malthus’ scrutiny

Louis-Marie Nindorera argues that Burundi’s political leadership will be a key determinant in how the country manages land scarcity.

As the time for a new population census approaches, Burundi counts its mouths to feed, breaks up, plows and seeds its land. Under demographic pressure, it gets smaller and smaller, less and less fertile. Today, 11,5 million inhabitants are squeezed into a […]

Book Review: Ellen Johnson Sirleaf by Pamela Scully

 In scarcely 100 short pages, this excellent addition to the Ohio Short Histories of Africa series offers a valuable perspective on Liberia’s outgoing President, and Africa’s first elected female Head of State.  With its small size yet wide scope, it sometimes reads less as a biography of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, and more as a potted history of the Republic […]

8 events that marked the continent in 2017

As the year comes to an end, Grace Thompson looks at 8 events that marked 2017:

Death of Botswana’s former president

Quett Masire, the second president of Botswana, passed away on June 22. Although not as famous as his predecessor, Seretse Khama, Masire had a decisive impact on the progress and success of Botswana. In his article, “Former Botswana President Quett […]

  • Permalink South Sudanese children rehearse a dance routine to be performed at half-time during South Sudan’s national football team match with Kenya as part of the Independence Day celebrations. (Photo: Paul Banks, United Nations)Gallery

    When Success Becomes a Burden: Challenges of Nations Building in Post-Liberation South Sudan

When Success Becomes a Burden: Challenges of Nations Building in Post-Liberation South Sudan

LSE Alumnus Jacob D. Chol explores how the struggle for South Sudanese independence has become a burden to its citizens.

On 9th July 2011, the world celebrated the ushering in of a nascent State, the Republic of South Sudan. Many commentators argued South Sudan was a “destined to fail State”. The liberators, now turned-leaders of this the new Republic, quickly […]

December 6th, 2017|Conflict, Featured, Society|0 Comments|
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    Book Review: Ties That Bind: Race and the Politics of Friendship in South Africa edited by Shannon Walsh and Jon Soske

Book Review: Ties That Bind: Race and the Politics of Friendship in South Africa edited by Shannon Walsh and Jon Soske

In Ties That Bind: Race and the Politics of Friendship in South Africa, editors Shannon Walsh and Jon Soske bring together contributors to investigate the intimacies and complicities that friendship can crystallise in the context of the histories of colonialism and apartheid in South Africa. With the volume focusing on the role that friendship can play in both dismantling and constructing difference, this is a […]

  • Permalink Amina Boubé encourages young women in Niger to to say no to forced marriage

Photo credit: World Bank Photo Collection via Flickr (http://bit.ly/2vO34Yn) CC BY-NC-ND 2.0Gallery

    Book Review: Marriage by Force?: Contestation over Consent and Coercion in Africa by Annie Bunting, Benjamin N. Lawrance, and Richard L. Roberts (eds.)

Book Review: Marriage by Force?: Contestation over Consent and Coercion in Africa by Annie Bunting, Benjamin N. Lawrance, and Richard L. Roberts (eds.)

Rhian Keyse recommends this book as essential reading for scholars and practitioners engaging in work to analyse and intervene in gender-based violence on the African continent and elsewhere.

Forced marriage in sub-Saharan Africa is a source of much international debate, especially with recent legal and policy attention to the role of such practices in conflict situations. Well-reported instances such as […]

African Pentecostal churches in Britain’s urban spaces

Richard Burgess looks at a Nigerian Pentecostal church in the London borough of Islington and finds that the church’s ability to occupy a permanent and dedicated space has influenced its visibility in the public sphere.

Our Pentecostalism in Britain series is in collaboration with LSE’s Religion and the Public Sphere blog.

In recent decades, London’s religious landscape has undergone significant changes […]

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International Migration Institute, University of OxfordGallery

    ‘They say we don’t pay taxes’: Undocumented tax-paying migrants living in the UK

‘They say we don’t pay taxes’: Undocumented tax-paying migrants living in the UK

Geraldine Asiwome Adiku argues for effective means to make undocumented migrants become documented in the UK, as the state is benefiting from them despite not officially recognising them.

‘They say we don’t pay taxes’, Yaa Mansa1, a middle-aged Ghanaian woman told me when we met in London on a wet Wednesday evening in December of 2014. We met in a […]

A New Vision for Addressing Youth Unemployment in Africa

Marta Santoboni and Alexandra Karlsson highlight the need for a long-term strategy for combating African youth unemployment that incorporates investing in economic upgrading, linkages within domestic economies, strengthening regionalisation and negotiating for more favourable global trade agreements.

Africa’s youth population is expected to double to 830 million by 2050 . Whereas corporate and grey literature cherishes this growth as a […]

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    Book Review – Volunteer Economies: The Politics and Ethics of Voluntary Labour in Africa, edited by Ruth Prince and Hannah Brown

Book Review – Volunteer Economies: The Politics and Ethics of Voluntary Labour in Africa, edited by Ruth Prince and Hannah Brown

LSE’s Jordan Vieira describes the book as a valuable contribution to the study of Africa that showcases the many benefits of situating ethnographic work within its historical, socio-political, and economic contexts.

 

‘Volunteering’ has been an increasingly prevalent mode of activity around the world for a myriad of reasons, and Africa’s changing social configurations make for a rich field in which […]

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