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    Developing England’s North: The Political Economy of the Northern Powerhouse – Book Review

Developing England’s North: The Political Economy of the Northern Powerhouse – Book Review

Developing England’s North: The Political Economy of the Northern Powerhouse. Craig Berry and Arianna Giovannini (eds). Palgrave. 2018.

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On 23 June 2014, in a speech in Manchester, the then Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, announced the Northern Powerhouse (NP). To raise the economic performance of the North, Osborne called for a new policy approach building on the […]

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    An up-to-date account of economic inequalities in Britain since 2008

An up-to-date account of economic inequalities in Britain since 2008

Income growth in the UK has been weak since the financial crisis. It is a trend which seems likely to continue through to the early 2020s. But in overall terms, this has not been accompanied by a worsening of income inequalities. Official data from the DWP indicate a broad stability in the inequality of disposable household income, equivalised (i.e. weighted) for […]

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    Lessons from the 1890s to realign innovation and finance in post-Brexit Britain

Lessons from the 1890s to realign innovation and finance in post-Brexit Britain

There is increasing consensus among political and economic commentators that the UK economy is in significant need of rebalancing. The gulf between the finance-based London economy and former manufacturing regions was thrown into sharp relief by the Brexit vote, reinforcing the momentum for the so-called “Northern Powerhouse” and “Midlands Engine” initiatives and, to underpin a new focus on regional […]

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    The French art market under the Nazi boot: looking for discreet assets

The French art market under the Nazi boot: looking for discreet assets

The French art market during the Occupation has been the subject of numerous publications that mostly focused on the fate of looted artworks, with limited attention given to the art market itself.

Using an original database of paintings sold at Hôtel Drouot, the main French auction house at the time, I recreate an art market price index for the period […]

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    Sumit Jamuar: Indians are 20% of the world’s population, but represent only 1% of existing genetic data

Sumit Jamuar: Indians are 20% of the world’s population, but represent only 1% of existing genetic data

As the new frontier in medicine, genomics brings with it the hope of allowing researchers to find the cure for a number of largely incurable diseases, from cancer to Alzheimer’s, to infectious diseases and beyond. The challenge now is to map the DNA of as many ethnicities and nationalities as possible.  Currently, 81 per cent of the existing genetic […]

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    Private firms as global borrowers: foreign and domestic lenders need equal protection

Private firms as global borrowers: foreign and domestic lenders need equal protection

The period 1990 to 2009 has witnessed private firms being promoted as independent borrowers in the global capital market. For a sample of 85 emerging market economies, in terms of percentage measures, the private sector publicly non-guaranteed share of total external debt on average increased from less than 5 per cent in 1990 to about 17 per cent in […]

January 9th, 2018|Finance, Xiang Gao|0 Comments|
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    Why an open mind on open science could reshape human knowledge

Why an open mind on open science could reshape human knowledge

In the year 1610, Galileo observed a ring-like shape around a distant planet (Saturn). After realising the significance of his discovery, Galileo wanted to record it to be able to claim it as his own contribution once it was announced. To do that, he wrote a letter to a colleague stating the following: “smaismrmilmepoetaleumibunenugttauiras”. That meaningless text was Galileo’s […]

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    The Infidel and The Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith and the Friendship that Shaped Modern Thought – Book Review

The Infidel and The Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith and the Friendship that Shaped Modern Thought – Book Review

The Infidel and The Professor: David Hume, Adam Smith and the Friendship that Shaped Modern Thought. Dennis C. Rasmussen. Princeton University Press. 2017.

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That philosophy takes friendship (philia) as its root is an etymological fact that is as well-known as it is of little interest. We are less likely to think of philosophy as the fruit of friendship […]

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    When white working-class men feel society no longer values them

When white working-class men feel society no longer values them

The Brexit referendum exposed deep political divisions within British society, and more than a year after that vote, those divisions show no signs of disappearing. Although the Leave campaign was carried to victory on the back of a broad coalition, one of its striking features was high levels of support for Brexit among white working-class men without a college […]

Exposure to innovation influences who becomes an inventor

Relatively little is known about the factors that induce people to become inventors. Using data on the lives of over one million inventors in the US, this column sheds light on what policies can be most effective in increasing innovation. In particular, it shows that increasing exposure to innovation among women, minorities, and children from low-income families may have […]

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    Mindfulness and the art of managing people as people, not ‘resources’

Mindfulness and the art of managing people as people, not ‘resources’

Mindfulness has become a buzzword in the corporate world. Google, Starbucks, and many other corporate behemoths wish to infuse it in their employees to reengage them. In many ways this approach to mindfulness may be mindless. It assumes that people are resources and that you need to get the MOST out of them. This viewpoint also often assumes that employees do […]

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    Devising new ways to make local retail contribute to urban vibrancy

Devising new ways to make local retail contribute to urban vibrancy

In most of the Western world, local independent stores are becoming ever more rare. Retail is increasingly dominated by large players  —  big retailers, global franchises and digital giants like Amazon. As a result, urban activities are less diversified, a sort of “drainage of the soil” in some areas and more urban exodus from left-out mid-sized cities.

Blaming big retail […]

When the only way is up: the pitfalls of upward mobility

For over two years, I have been working as an assistant professor at Delft University of Technology, making my way up the hierarchical, academic career ladder. I started as a PhD student at another university and, with every step up, from assistant professor to associate professor to full professor, I will get more money, more authority, more responsibility, and […]

Seven pieces of career advice

December 28th, 2017|Reading List|0 Comments|

Reading list: seven leading LSE women researchers

 

Anna Valero (Centre for Economic Performance):

Budget 2017: productivity is the focus, but ‘fixes’ are unlikely to be enough

 

Beverley Skeggs (International Inequalities Institute):

Wake up, algorithms are trawling your phone while you sleep

 

Connson Locke (Department of Management):

Are you a leader or a manager?

 

Emily Jackson (Department of Law):

Egg freezing has little to do with inflexible workplaces

 

Shani Orgad (Department of Media and Communications)

Women who quit their careers: a group rarely investigated

 

Sonia Livingstone (Department of Media and Communications)

A complex web of factors influence children’s commercial media literacy

 

Susanna Khavul (Department of Management):

Crowdfunding solves market failures in new venture financing


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December 26th, 2017|Reading List|0 Comments|

Brexit readiness score update: UK gets 22 out of 100

In the past three months the possibility of an orderly Brexit has increased markedly. In particular, the European Union and United Kingdom have negotiated a transition period lasting two years. And several thorny issues around the treatment of EU citizens in the United Kingdom have been clarified.

The inaugural Brexit Readiness Score gave low grades on the preparedness of the […]

Why economists are relaxed about bitcoin

Cryptocurrencies have been a staple of news headlines in 2017. As the price of one bitcoin has risen 12-fold in sterling terms during the course of 2017, the number of Google searches for bitcoin has increased 14-fold. There are now more than 2,000 cryptocurrency ATMs across the globe, with the United States (1,107), Canada (293), the UK (97) and […]

Socially responsible investment is growing at a fast clip

The Paris Agreement on climate change took place in December 2015 with signatories agreeing to keep the rise in global temperatures below 2 degrees Celsius (above pre-industrial levels). The most recent follow-up meeting took place in Bonn, Germany in November. Politicians, NGOs and regulators have taken the lead, but they need the financial services industry to put its money […]

December 19th, 2017|Environment, Tim Fright|0 Comments|

What causes asset price bubbles?

Why do asset price bubbles in real markets happen? Experimental asset markets have pursued the reasons for a long time. Our research clarifies them by distinguishing between two effects, confusion and strategic uncertainty.

The asset price bubbles observed in real markets are often regarded as irrational exuberance, as pointed by Professor Robert Shiller (Nobel laureate in 2013). However, we succeed […]

Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People – Book Review

Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People. Timothy Morton. Verso. 2017.

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When I think about a climate-changed future, I tend to picture something terrifying like Cormac McCarthy’s novel The Road. It is grey. There is scarcity, extinction, doom. Yet, it doesn’t have to be like that, suggests Timothy Morton, in Humankind: Solidarity with Nonhuman People: we can even do better […]