• Permalink Gallery

    Recognising interdisciplinary expertise: is it time we established the integration and implementation sciences?

Recognising interdisciplinary expertise: is it time we established the integration and implementation sciences?

Embedding interdisciplinarity into the academic mainstream has proved a constant challenge. Gabriele Bammer asks whether it might help to define the relevant expertise as a new discipline, one that recognises important skills such as the ability to combine knowledge from different disciplines, determine which disciplines and stakeholders have valuable perspectives, examine how elements of problems are interconnected, assess the […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Doing Research in the Business World by David E. Gray

Book Review: Doing Research in the Business World by David E. Gray

In Doing Research in the Business World, David E. Gray offers an expansive textbook exploring diverse methodologies for undertaking research in business. Covering an impressive span of approaches and well-structured, this work will not only be an excellent resource for students and researchers but Richard Cotter also highly recommends it to practitioners in the business world.
This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books and is […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    The methodology used for the Times Higher Education World University Rankings’ citations metric can distort benchmarking

The methodology used for the Times Higher Education World University Rankings’ citations metric can distort benchmarking

The Times Higher Education World University Rankings can influence an institution’s reputation and even its future revenues. However, Avtar Natt argues that the methodology used to calculate its citation metrics can have the effect of distorting benchmarking exercises. The fractional counting approach applied to only a select number of papers with high author numbers has led to a situation […]

Print Friendly

Materiality of Research: Without End: Documents of Research

What are the parameters of the academic document? And how can its myriad forms deepen and shape the process of being in research? Ahead of upcoming postgraduate symposium Without End: Documents of Research (University of Northampton, 16 February 2018), Meghann Hillier-Broadley and Francis Blore reflect on the generative potential of the various fragments – from post-it notes to notebooks to highlighted texts – that form the material substances inspiring […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Crumpled Paper Boat: Experiments in Ethnographic Writing edited by Anand Pandian and Stuart McLean

Book Review: Crumpled Paper Boat: Experiments in Ethnographic Writing edited by Anand Pandian and Stuart McLean

In Crumpled Paper Boat: Experiments in Ethnographic Writing, editors Anand Pandian and Stuart McLean offer a collection that seeks to open up the possibilities for ethnographic research by approaching writing as a “material adventure”. As the volume grapples with longstanding questions regarding the ethical challenges of capturing one’s subjects in language, Fawzia Haeri Mazanderani nonetheless finds this a moving reminder of the power of words to enable entry […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Four strategies to increase the likelihood of creating and sustaining successful research teams

Four strategies to increase the likelihood of creating and sustaining successful research teams

Modern scientific expertise rests heavily upon work carried out by teams, rather than scholars working on their own. Proper preparation is key, with some research suggesting that the effectiveness of collaborative work is determined before any of the work is carried out. Howard Aldrich and Akram Al-Turk have identified four structural elements that increase the likelihood of creating and […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Transcribing for Social Research by Alexa Hepburn and Galina B. Bolden

Book Review: Transcribing for Social Research by Alexa Hepburn and Galina B. Bolden

In Transcribing for Social Research, Alexa Hepburn and Galina B. Bolden offer a new guide to transcribing that argues that sensitive transcription is an integral aspect of analysis, rather than something that comes prior to it. Lauriane Suyin Chalmin-Pui recommends this book for presenting deep yet readable technical detail, while also acting as an inspiration to those embarking on transcribing for research.
This review originally appeared on LSE […]

Print Friendly
September 10th, 2017|Research methods|0 Comments|
  • Permalink Gallery

    Towards more integrative research practices: introducing Open Walked Event-based Experimentations

Towards more integrative research practices: introducing Open Walked Event-based Experimentations

In recent years, many academics have expressed their dissatisfaction or disillusionment with academia. Some have tired of the “publish or perish” game, while others have grown bored of traditional practices of academic writing and conference attendance. To address this problem, François-Xavier de Vaujany and Laetitia Vitaud present a new research method: Open Walked Event-based Experimentations. Key to OWEE is spending […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Research and Evaluation for Busy Students and Practitioners: A Time-Saving Guide (2nd Ed.) by Helen Kara

Book Review: Research and Evaluation for Busy Students and Practitioners: A Time-Saving Guide (2nd Ed.) by Helen Kara

In this new second edition of Research and Evaluation for Busy Students and Practitioners: A Time-Saving Guide, Helen Kara offers a book for students, researchers and practitioners looking to manage their time effectively and maintain a good work-life balance whilst undertaking methodologically and ethically robust social research and evaluation projects. This is a well-written and clear guide that will trigger self-reflection and boost […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Reading list: eight books on Indigenous research methods, recommended by Helen Kara

Reading list: eight books on Indigenous research methods, recommended by Helen Kara

In this reading list, Helen Kara recommends eight books for those looking to incorporate Indigenous methodologies within their own research and to better understand Indigenous research methods on their own terms.

This version of this post first appeared on LSE Review of Books. The reading list originally appeared on Helen Kara’s personal blog and is republished with permission.
Recently I wrote about challenging the […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    New digital methods can be used to analyse linguistic terms and better understand Reddit communities

New digital methods can be used to analyse linguistic terms and better understand Reddit communities

Reddit is now the fourth most visited website in the US. Yet, surprisingly, given its position as an extremely large community, it has been the subject of relatively little research. Tim Squirrell has developed methods of studying the genealogy, spread, and use of particular words on Reddit, as demonstrated by this case study of The_Donald, the largest pro-Trump community […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    It’s time designing for the colour blind became a more integrated component of academic and media training

It’s time designing for the colour blind became a more integrated component of academic and media training

Despite affecting one in 12 men and one in 200 women, colour blindness rarely features in discussions around access and inclusivity. Oliver Daddow explains how his preferred research methodology has been informed by his colour blindness, but also reveals the frustration he has felt since joining Twitter earlier this year. A variety of data representations are increasingly shared via […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Research should not allow the loud voice of online content production to drown out the quiet majority of internet users

Research should not allow the loud voice of online content production to drown out the quiet majority of internet users

Social science research aims to record, analyse, and make sense of social mess; to observe and account for everything in a given setting. Why, then, does so much of the research carried out online refuse to do this? Harry Dyer argues that in order to understand the social uses of the internet, it is crucial that research is not […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Thinking Like a Political Scientist: A Practical Guide to Research Methods by Christopher Howard

Book Review: Thinking Like a Political Scientist: A Practical Guide to Research Methods by Christopher Howard

In Thinking like a Political Scientist: A Practical Guide to Research Methods, Christopher Howard makes a compelling case for transforming how research methods are taught to undergraduate students of political science. Through its accessible, easy-to-follow approach, this new guide equips and encourages the next generation of political scientists to undertake research that has the potential to directly impact pressing […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Using Twitter as a data source: an overview of social media research tools (updated for 2017)

Using Twitter as a data source: an overview of social media research tools (updated for 2017)

Following his initial post on this topic in 2015, Wasim Ahmed has updated and expanded his rundown of the tools available to social scientists looking to analyse social media data. A number of new applications have been released in the intervening period, with the increasing complexity of certain research questions also having prompted some tools to increase their data […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Engaging with sensor-based methods for social sciences research is necessary, overdue and potentially rewarding

Engaging with sensor-based methods for social sciences research is necessary, overdue and potentially rewarding

Sensors are an important source of big data. Developments at the heart of “smart cities” or the exploding “quantified self” movement are all reliant on sensors. However, attempts by social scientists to engage with sensors from a methodological perspective have been rare. Jörg Müller argues that such engagement is not only necessary and overdue, but also potentially rewarding. It’s […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    Book Review: Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies edited by Ben Campkin and Ger Duijzings

Book Review: Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies edited by Ben Campkin and Ger Duijzings

In Engaged Urbanism: Cities and Methodologies, editors Ben Campkin and GerDuijzings bring together contributors who are challenging assumptions surrounding urban research methodologies. Exploring questions of authorship, expertise and situated knowledge, this is a well-designed and timely book that showcases an array of creative and critical approaches to urban research, finds Helen Traill.
This review originally appeared on LSE Review of Books and […]

Print Friendly
  • Permalink Gallery

    With great power comes great responsibility: crowdsourcing raises methodological and ethical questions for academia

With great power comes great responsibility: crowdsourcing raises methodological and ethical questions for academia

Crowdsourcing offers researchers ready access to large numbers of participants, while enabling the processing of huge, unique datasets. However, the power of crowdsourcing raises several issues, including whether or not what initially emerged as a business practice can be transformed into a sound research method. Isabell Stamm and Lina Eklund argue that the complexities of managing large numbers of […]

Print Friendly
This work by LSE Impact of Social Sciences blog is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.