Jul 16 2015

The Dominique Jacquin-Berdal Travel Grant awarded for 2015

Leave a comment
Dr Dominique Jacquin-Berdal 1966-2006

Dr Dominique Jacquin-Berdal 1966-2006

The Dominique Jacquin-Berdal Travel Grant was established by the International Relations Department at the LSE in memory of Dr Dominique Jacquin-Berdal who was a lecturer in the Department from 1999 until her death in 2006. She taught on nationalism and Africa as well as in the field of international relations theory. Her most well-known publication is Nationalism and Ethnicity in the Horn of Africa published in 2002. Her colleague James Mayall wrote an obituary in The Guardian, plus a longer piece in the IR Department journal Millennium.

The annual grant of £2,500 is intended to support travel and living costs for IR Department students’ research in the fields of Africa, ethnicity and nationalism. The 2015 grant holder is Ilaria Carrozza and she gives her reactions, plus details of her project, below. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: , ,

Jun 17 2015

New book from IR Department alumnus Sean McFate

Leave a comment

The Modern Mercenary coverTHE MODERN MERCENARY: Private Armies and What They Mean for World Order

by Sean McFate
(PhD International Relations 2011)

Published: Oxford University Press; January 2, 2015
ISBN: 9780199360109; 272 pages; $29.95

This book is based on doctoral work that Sean McFate completed in the Department of International Relations under Professor Christopher Coker. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: , ,

Jun 11 2015

New online portal on Gulf History involving IR Dept PhD alumnus, Francis Owtram

Leave a comment
Francis Owtram

Francis Owtram

IR Department  PhD alumnus, Francis Owtram, is currently assisting with the development of an online portal of archival material which will be of key interest to students of the history and international relations of the Arabian/Persian Gulf.  The Qatar Digital Library (www.qdl.qa) was launched in October 2014 and is a new bi-lingual, online portal providing access to previously undigitised British Library archive materials relating to Gulf history and Arabic science. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: , , ,

Apr 28 2015

Award-winning novelist Karl Marlantes visits LSE International Relations Department

Leave a comment
Karl Marlantes

Karl Marlantes

On 12/13 March 2015 the LSE International Relations Department was visited by decorated Marine and Vietnam War veteran, Karl Marlantes, writer of one of the great books about war in his award-winning novel/memoir Matterhorn. Marlantes agreed to join a ‘Talk Back to the Author Event’ with students about his book, and an academic workshop. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: , , , ,

Apr 21 2015

A View from the Border: Everyday lives in Burma’s conflict zones in times of transition

Leave a comment

This article originally appeared on the India at LSE blog.

This week, a new photo exhibition opened at LSE with images taken by Hkun Lat, Hkun Li and David Brenner portraying the everyday lives of people in Burma’s conflict-ridden Kachin State. In this photo essay David Brenner offers selected images from the exhibition and an insight into their context.

The exhibition is open Monday 13 April – Friday 8 May 2015 (10am-8pm, Mon-Fri) in the Atrium Gallery of LSE’s Old Building. Entry is free. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: ,

Apr 16 2015

The Global Transformation: history, modernity and the making of international relations – a public discussion

Leave a comment

On Tuesday 17 March 2015 the Department of International Relations held a public discussion to launch a new book: The Global Transformation: history, modernity and the making of international relations, co-authored by Barry Buzan and George Lawson. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Feb 10 2015

Hezbollah, Islamist Politics, and International Society: NEW BOOK by IR Dept PhD alumnus Filippo Dionigi

Leave a comment

Dionigi_HezbollahIslamism constitutes a new variant of the communitarian challenge to a liberal international order. But is it a viable political project in a world where human rights and international humanitarian principles have become so pervasive?  What are the consequences of the global diffusion of the norms of international society for Islamist groups that (pro)claim a self-referential Muslim identity; attempt to shield their communities from allegedly alien moral conceptions; and assert the exclusive validity of supposedly immutable Islamic principles?

In this book Filippo Dionigi claims that the influence of international norms on Islamist politics goes beyond an instrumental norm-conformist behavior by Islamist actors. International norms instill in the discourse and agency of Islamism conceptions of person and community which facilitate a sense of membership to international society, instead of being its outcasts. By using the case of Lebanon’s Hezbollah, the author illustrates how this Islamist movement has become more cognizant of the cogency of the norms of international society. The result is a precarious but innovative equilibrium in which a political actor redefines its Islamist identity by rethinking the idea of an allegedly “authentic” Islamic morality and the legitimacy of international norms. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: , ,

Feb 3 2015

US Foreign Policy Conference 2014 – video available

Leave a comment

US Foreign Policy Conference 17-19 September 2014

The International Relations Department, together with IDEAS, co-hosted the US Foreign Policy Conference at LSE on September 17-19 2014. Please click here for the detailed programme.

Across 3 days, the conference brought together scholars of US foreign policy from the UK, Europe, the United States and Canada, along with policymakers and postgraduate students – over 100 participants in all.

The theme of the conference was ‘Global Perspectives’. It reflects the fact that the impact of US foreign policy is felt everywhere and at every level. Deep histories animate American engagements almost everywhere. The United States dominates the settlements of the global economy and defines the terms of international development. It is the state looked to in times of international crisis, and to lead in addressing global challenges. Yet the power and purpose behind US decision-making is the subject of perpetual debate. Critical approaches contrast American values with US actions. And America’s polarised domestic politics betray a profound ambivalence to its international role.

In this short video, speakers from the Conference share their perspective on the changing shape of power in the international system, and the implications for US foreign policy:

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with:

Dec 2 2014

Cumberland Lodge Conference 2014

Leave a comment
Cumberland Lodge

Cumberland Lodge

When it comes to Cumberland Lodge — a former royal residence, a picture just emerges where political elites were secretly whispering about how to formulate a grand strategy. This was what this year’s IR community were going to do at Cumberland Lodge. After fighting their way out of London’s Friday evening traffic, the attendees from the International Relations Department arrived at Cumberland Lodge, embarking for an exciting academic weekend on grand strategy. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with:

Oct 28 2014

New Book by IR Department PhD graduate Dr Kai Monheim

Leave a comment

Monheim_Kai_1The new book on international negotiations by Dr Kai Monheim, a recent PhD graduate from the Department of International Relations, is due out on 5 November and available for pre-order now:

How Effective Negotiation Management Promotes Multilateral Co-operation: The power of process in climate, trade and biosafety negotiations, will be published by Routledge in November 2014.

The book examines the determinants of success or failure at such summits in an effort to formulate the regimes and management processes which drive multilateral negotiations. It uses in-depth empirical analysis gathered at major global summits from South Africa to Mexico and from Doha to Geneva. Continue reading

Posted by: Posted on by Blog editor Tagged with: , ,