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    Long Read | In the Name of God: The Asia Bibi Case and its implications for the Rule of Law and Islam in Pakistan

Long Read | In the Name of God: The Asia Bibi Case and its implications for the Rule of Law and Islam in Pakistan

When Pakistan’s Supreme Court acquitted Asia Bibi of blasphemy, the three-member bench made their legal decision by appealing to Islam rather than the Constitution. Amber Darr (UCL) looks at why such a ruling, which is being hailed around the world as a landmark judgement, furthers the cause of the religious right and risks shifting sovereignty in Pakistan from a […]

December 6th, 2018|Law, Religion|Comments Off on Long Read | In the Name of God: The Asia Bibi Case and its implications for the Rule of Law and Islam in Pakistan|

Myanmar 2020 – Rohingya Citizenship: Now or Never?

Myanmar’s 1982 Citizenship Law is not just a tool for denying the Rohingya their rights, it has also contributed to the military’s acts of genocide against them. With elections in two years, the next 12 months may be the last chance to reform the law, give the Rohingya their long overdue citizenship rights, and help create conditions for the safe […]

November 2nd, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Law, Politics|Comments Off on Myanmar 2020 – Rohingya Citizenship: Now or Never?|

The role of mercy in India

Shubhangi Agarwalla argues that the death penalty has bureaucratised death and in doing so, relieved individuals of a sense of their own moral responsibility within its delivery. Considering Derrida’s seminal argument on mercy, Indian society must reconsider the pivotal role of mercy within justice, writes Agarwalla.

In India there has recently been such a sustained focus on the right to […]

August 13th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Law|Comments Off on The role of mercy in India|
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    “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

“If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman

Preceding an evening of celebrating the life of eminent human rights activist and lawyer Asma Jahangir at LSE, her friend and fellow activist I.A. Rehman discussed his work in Pakistan, the establishment of the HRCP (Human Rights Commission, Pakistan) and Asma’s powerful legacy with Amber Darr.  

AD: How did you begin your human rights journey?

IAR: It started in 1949, when I […]

August 7th, 2018|Featured, Human Rights, Interviews, Law, Religion, Society and Culture|Comments Off on “If the state starts to see sense, then people will follow. But I think this will take time” – Ibn Abdur Rehman|
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    “The mixture of Islam as a state religion adjoining secularism is not healthy.” – Sara Hossain 

“The mixture of Islam as a state religion adjoining secularism is not healthy.” – Sara Hossain 

On the sidelines of the LSE-Berkeley Bangladesh Summit held at LSE in June 2018, Mahima A. Jain interviewed to Bangladeshi lawyer Sara Hossain, who was a panellist discussing “Civil Society and the State”.

In this interview, Sara Hossain discusses the problems that Bangladesh faces in an attempt to balance secularism with Islam highlighting the validity and space that the government gives to views of extremist groups. “What […]

July 6th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Corruption, Development, Featured, Gender, Interviews, Law, Politics, Religion, Sustainable Development Goals|Comments Off on “The mixture of Islam as a state religion adjoining secularism is not healthy.” – Sara Hossain |

Is Sri Lanka missing out on Asia’s digital economy boom?

Although Asia’s digital economy is booming, there is a risk of some countries being left behind. Anishka De Zylva and Ganeshan Wignaraja make the case for why Sri Lanka must invest to benefit from Asia’s rapidly growing digital economy, and delineate a four-pronged approach that the country can follow. 
Asia’s digital economy is booming. By market capitalisation, about one-third of the largest […]

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    Has the west been won? Understanding the legal and political implications of the FATA-KPK merger

Has the west been won? Understanding the legal and political implications of the FATA-KPK merger

The President of Pakistan, Mamnoon Hussain, recently signed the 31st Constitutional Amendment Bill into law, giving a green light to the merger between Pakistan’s Federal Administered Tribal Area (FATA) and its Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province (KPK). Whilst this has been hailed as a democratic victory, Amber Darr examines the complex legal and political implications of this enactment. 

On 31st May 2018, the President of […]

June 11th, 2018|Featured, History, Law, Politics, Religion, Rural Areas, Security and Foreign Policy|Comments Off on Has the west been won? Understanding the legal and political implications of the FATA-KPK merger|
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    Public Sector Banks in India: Revisiting regulatory and corporate governance in the light of the PNB scam

Public Sector Banks in India: Revisiting regulatory and corporate governance in the light of the PNB scam

The Punjab National Bank scam, India’s largest banking fraud, has shed light on the necessity for an overhaul of regulatory and corporate governance practices in Indian public sector banks. Param Pandya gives an overview of the history of regulation and governance of PSBs and proposes some solutions in the light of the increasing number of scams. 
Banking frauds in India have […]

May 30th, 2018|Economy, Featured, Law|Comments Off on Public Sector Banks in India: Revisiting regulatory and corporate governance in the light of the PNB scam|
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    Pakistan’s ‘Pashtun Spring’ faces off against a colonial-era law

Pakistan’s ‘Pashtun Spring’ faces off against a colonial-era law

A major hurdle facing the residents of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) is the century-old colonial law that still governs it—the 1901 Frontier Crimes Regulation (FCR).  Harrison Akins gives a brief overview of the FCR’s history and structure, followed by an analysis of the current opposition to the government’s plan for reforming FATA’s legal framework.
Emerging from the turmoil of […]

May 25th, 2018|Development, Featured, History, Human Rights, Law, Politics, Society and Culture, Sustainable Development Goals|Comments Off on Pakistan’s ‘Pashtun Spring’ faces off against a colonial-era law|

The legacy of colonialism in Bangladesh’s police

Bangladesh Police is the country’s primary law enforcement agency and is still guided by the basic principles of a colonial establishment, 70 years after the end of British colonial rule. Laws that were enacted at the height of the British Empire remain in effect today and control the police force. Colonial customs and traditions make it difficult for the […]

May 24th, 2018|Cities and Urban Studies, Development, Featured, History, Human Rights, Law|Comments Off on The legacy of colonialism in Bangladesh’s police|

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