Urban, rural and regional policies

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    Book Review: Handbook of Gentrification Studies edited by Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips

Book Review: Handbook of Gentrification Studies edited by Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips

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In the Handbook of Gentrification Studies, Loretta Lees with Martin Phillips bring together contributors to explore different types of gentrification around the world, debate the term’s utility for describing diverse phenomena and consider modes of response. The volume offers a good starting point for understanding the wide-ranging discussions of gentrification, underscores the need to approach it flexibly, comparatively and through […]

How migrants help to slow neighborhood decline in US cities

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In recent years, immigration has become a political football, with some American cities encouraging inflows of people from other countries while others adopt more punitive measures towards the undocumented. In new research, Matt Ruther evaluates the effects that immigrants have on urban neighborhoods that are in decline. He finds that neighborhoods with more foreign born-minorities tend to have […]

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    How access to public transit may have saved many Americans’ homes during the Great Recession

How access to public transit may have saved many Americans’ homes during the Great Recession

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The Great Recession which followed the 2008 financial crash saw massive increases in the number of homes being foreclosed and trillions wiped from homeowners’ equity. But the impact of the recession was not uniform across the country in all places. In new research, Timothy F. Welch, Steven R. Gehrke and Steven Farber look at the effects of […]

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    Book Review: Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless by Robert Rosenberger

Book Review: Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless by Robert Rosenberger

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In Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless, Robert Rosenberger explores the growth of ‘hostile architecture’ and reflects on what it suggests about society’s attitudes towards the homelesss as well as our relationship with contemporary design. This short, vivid and novel book serves as a timely reminder that our public spaces are not experienced equally, writes Jon Dean. 

Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless. […]

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    Book Review: Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City edited by Neil Smith and Don Mitchell et al

Book Review: Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City edited by Neil Smith and Don Mitchell et al

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First conceived by Neil Smith and posthumously completed by colleagues, Revolting New York: How 400 Years of Riot, Rebellion, Uprising and Revolution Shaped a City offers a collection of essays exploring the history of protest in New York City. Without suggesting that riots always have immediate, obvious results, the volume shows the physical and cultural effects that 400 years of […]

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    Book Review: God Save Texas: A Long Journey into the Future of America by Lawrence Wright

Book Review: God Save Texas: A Long Journey into the Future of America by Lawrence Wright

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In God Save Texas: A Long Journey into the Future of America, Lawrence Wright delves behind the numerous stereotypes that surround the Lone Star State, presenting a rich and complex tapestry of its history and politics. Exploring its subtle and complex dynamics, Wright offers a convincing take on Texas as torn between parochial histories, nationalist sentiments and global aspirations, writes Jeff […]

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    Gentrification is relentless, but not inevitable if locals are able to help shape redevelopment.

Gentrification is relentless, but not inevitable if locals are able to help shape redevelopment.

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Across the US and in much of the developed world, many urban authorities regard gentrification as one of the only paths to neighborhood regeneration. Using activism in Pilsen, Chicago, as a case study, Winifred Curran argues that while the displacement of lower income residents is an essential component of gentrification, its worst effects can be alleviated when locals have […]

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    Why the developing world should look beyond the US experience as a model to manage rapid urbanization.

Why the developing world should look beyond the US experience as a model to manage rapid urbanization.

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By 2100, eight billion people could live in cities in what is now the developing world. As local and national policy makers grapple with how to manage this rapid population change, many look to the US experience of rural-urban transformation in the 20th century. Juan Pablo Chauvin cautions that differences in key drivers of change such as internal migration […]

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    Why living in an area with more businesses and denser housing might help keep you safer on the street

Why living in an area with more businesses and denser housing might help keep you safer on the street

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Recent decades have seen two important trends in America’s cities: a return of young professionals to previously neglected urban cores, and a dramatic decline in violent crime. In new research, which explores these patterns, Tate Twinam examines the link between crime and the density of land use in Chicago. He finds that in residential areas that also contain shops […]

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    Why reducing urban traffic congestion can help the American middle class

Why reducing urban traffic congestion can help the American middle class

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No-one likes to be stuck in traffic – but what are the larger effects of delays due to congestion beyond just being late for work? Using data from Los Angeles, Yuting Hou examines how these sorts of delays influence house prices. She finds that peak-period congestion delays are linked to lower house prices because they make jobs less accessible. […]

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