Urban, rural and regional policies

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    Why the developing world should look beyond the US experience as a model to manage rapid urbanization.

Why the developing world should look beyond the US experience as a model to manage rapid urbanization.

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By 2100, eight billion people could live in cities in what is now the developing world. As local and national policy makers grapple with how to manage this rapid population change, many look to the US experience of rural-urban transformation in the 20th century. Juan Pablo Chauvin cautions that differences in key drivers of change such as internal migration […]

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    Why living in an area with more businesses and denser housing might help keep you safer on the street

Why living in an area with more businesses and denser housing might help keep you safer on the street

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Recent decades have seen two important trends in America’s cities: a return of young professionals to previously neglected urban cores, and a dramatic decline in violent crime. In new research, which explores these patterns, Tate Twinam examines the link between crime and the density of land use in Chicago. He finds that in residential areas that also contain shops […]

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    Why reducing urban traffic congestion can help the American middle class

Why reducing urban traffic congestion can help the American middle class

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No-one likes to be stuck in traffic – but what are the larger effects of delays due to congestion beyond just being late for work? Using data from Los Angeles, Yuting Hou examines how these sorts of delays influence house prices. She finds that peak-period congestion delays are linked to lower house prices because they make jobs less accessible. […]

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    Cities with more African Americans rely more on fines for revenue

Cities with more African Americans rely more on fines for revenue

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The rise of the Black Lives Matter movement following the 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, also focused attention on how police and city officials use fines taken from communities of color to fund city administration. In new research, which examined revenue data from more than 9,000 cities, Michael W. Sances and Hye Young You find that […]

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    Without proper planning, large-scale industrial growth can be a curse rather than a blessing for rural communities

Without proper planning, large-scale industrial growth can be a curse rather than a blessing for rural communities

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For decades, rural communities in the US have sought to attract industrial development via tax and zoning incentives and other subsidies. But what happens in the decades which follow after a large company establishes itself? Sudeshna Ghosh and Carla Chifos tracked the effects of Toyota’s manufacturing plant on rural counties in Kentucky over three decades. They find that most […]

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    How we can preserve assisted housing in the context of gentrification and constrained federal resources

How we can preserve assisted housing in the context of gentrification and constrained federal resources

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Like many American cities, Washington DC is experiencing a squeeze in its affordable housing: population increases and declining stocks of government subsidized housing are making it harder for low-income households to find somewhere to live. In new research, Kathryn Howell looks at how existing assisted housing in Washington, DC is being preserved in the face of gentrification and funding […]

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    Few big-city mayors see running for higher office as appealing

Few big-city mayors see running for higher office as appealing

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Former mayors are not unknown in Congress and in governors’ mansions – but does running a big city act as a springboard for higher office? To answer this question, Katherine Levine Einstein, David M. Glick, Maxwell Palmer and Robert J. Pressel collected data from nearly 200 large US cities and interviewed 94 mayors. They find that mayors are not […]

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    Book Review: Suburban Planet: Making the World Urban from the Outside In by Roger Keil

Book Review: Suburban Planet: Making the World Urban from the Outside In by Roger Keil

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Suburban Planet: Making the World Urban from the Outside In, authored by Roger Keil, emerges out of an eight-year research programme on global suburbanisms to explore the diversity of suburban forms worldwide, as well as their historical trajectories, governance and infrastructure. This is a concise and well-structured contribution to urban studies, writes Jenny McArthur, that shows how understanding the […]

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    Book Review: Building and Dwelling: Ethics for the City by Richard Sennett

Book Review: Building and Dwelling: Ethics for the City by Richard Sennett

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In Building and Dwelling: Ethics for the City, Richard Sennett approaches the question of how we should live in the city. Drawing upon two aspects of the city, the ville and the cité, the book promotes the virtues of an ‘open city’ that accepts and works with complexity, ambiguity and uncertainty. While John Tomaney finds this a learned and literate […]

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    Strong and inclusive mayors are filling the gaps in state and federal decision making

Strong and inclusive mayors are filling the gaps in state and federal decision making

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In an era of federal –and often state – legislative gridlock, the former Mayor of Salt Lake City, Ralph Becker writes that cities can be important for instituting positive change when other governments can no longer do so. Here he reflects on his own experience of revitalizing Salt Lake City’s downtown, and on the leadership of cities in Kentucky, […]

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