LSE - Small Logo
LSE - Small Logo

Blog Editor

November 8th, 2012

ODI conference evaluates the evolution of development co-operation

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Blog Editor

November 8th, 2012

ODI conference evaluates the evolution of development co-operation

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

Romilly Greenhill of the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) talks about Old puzzles, new pieces: development co-operation in tomorrow’s world, a conference set for 14 and 15 November in London.

 

What will development cooperation look like in 2025? How should development agencies, governments and NGOs adapt to the fundamental shifts underway across the globe? What impact will new forms of private investment and philanthropy have? What does the rise of South-South cooperation mean for traditional donors and developing countries?

The world is changing – fundamentally and irreversibly.

With the rise of China and Brazil and game changing models of person-to-person giving, social impact investment and philanthropy, the community of actors engaged in development cooperation is evolving. This will provide fresh opportunities and choices for developing countries.

New and traditional development actors must also adapt to changes in the global landscape of poverty. While recent research suggests that the future of poverty is predominantly in fragile states, high levels of poverty will remain a challenge in middle income countries for some time. Increasing economic pressures and demands for accountability call for development actors to design, test and implement new tools to improve the effectiveness of their assistance. Development actors must adapt to this changing context, whilst forging new ways of working together to achieve global development goals.

The implications for developing countries, aid agencies, NGOs and new players in the aid arena are profound. However, with evidence on these trends only slowly emerging, and grandiose claims all too often drowning out reality, many still grapple to understand these changes and how to respond.

The 2012 CAPE conference will convene leading thinkers, key practitioners and influential representatives from developing country governments. This is a chance to explore some of the latest evidence on how these global changes are taking shape and seek collective answers to some of the big questions in development.

While in-person attendance to the conference is by invitation only, each session will be broadcast live and questions from all around the world will be taken through social media and a dedicated chatroom.

Tweet your questions on the future of development cooperation to #CAPE2012

How to attend

About the author

Blog Editor

Posted In: Development

Leave a Reply

Bad Behavior has blocked 2458 access attempts in the last 7 days.