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Gustav

October 16th, 2020

Guest blog by Gustav Brincat: volunteering with Action Tutoring

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Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Gustav

October 16th, 2020

Guest blog by Gustav Brincat: volunteering with Action Tutoring

0 comments

Estimated reading time: 10 minutes

Gustav (LLB in Laws, 2022) has been a volunteer with Action Tutoring making a difference to pupils in London since November 2018. Gustav has shared his story for you to learn more about his experience as a tutor. We hope you enjoy reading about his Action Tutoring journey.

Tell us a bit about why you decided to apply to become a volunteer tutor.

I’m studying Law at LSE. I saw this volunteering opportunity at a Careers Fair and thought that it would be something very different to my degree, and much more rewarding. I realised this year it’s such a great escape, too: it’s so enjoyable. I’m thinking completely differently.

In your opinion, what skills do you need to be a tutor?

Communication is the biggest one. Talking to a ten year old sounds like the kind of thing anyone can do, but you’ve got to phrase things completely differently and be conscious of the answers you’re giving. Sometimes knowing a lot about a topic can disadvantage you because you can’t communicate it clearly to those who don’t. It does sound silly, but being able to communicate clearly to a ten-year old is a very useful skill!

Have you noticed a difference in your pupil since you first started tutoring on this programme?

I’ve definitely noticed a change in my pupil. The questions [my pupil] is asking are far more analytical and his confidence is growing. At the beginning, he didn’t want to ask certain questions, and if I prompted him he’d talk but then outside of that he wouldn’t. Now he’s realising that there are no stupid questions and he might actively interrupt me to ask a question which is good; that’s exactly what I want. It’s nice to see that we’ve built a rapport and he doesn’t feel afraid.

How has volunteering as a tutor contributed to other areas of your life?

Volunteering provides the opportunity to work with people that you wouldn’t normally work with. Tutoring commercially is so different from volunteer tutoring, and I think you feel much more of a connection you really want to help them. Aside from that, there are emotional benefits: the thing that I’ve found the most is that it’s an escape from the high pressure of my degree. This is a world apart from that.

Why would you recommend volunteering with Action Tutoring?

There’s lots of support from Action Tutoring in particular. The workbook makes it easy to get through the work and there’s also a lot of scope to do things you want to do. If you want to take it a step further you can, but if some weeks you’re busy and you don’t have the time, you can just stick to the workbook. There’s so much to love about it.

If Gustav has inspired you to volunteer, find out more about volunteering with Action Tutoring here or check out one of our other ongoing opportunities  You can also book a one-to-one with David Coles, the Volunteer Centre Manager if you have more questions. And why not follow us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram to stay up-to-date with our events and opportunities and read our blog for more volunteering tips and stories.

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About the author

Gustav

LLB in Laws, 2022

Posted In: Charity | Healthcare and wellbeing | NGO | Public sector | Volunteer Centre

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