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    Improving disabled people’s employment and pay: changing patterns of campaigning and influencing

Improving disabled people’s employment and pay: changing patterns of campaigning and influencing

Having previously outlined a set of proposals that could improve disabled people’s opportunities for employment and pay, Liz Sayce highlights the need for campaigning agendas that are inclusive, recognise difference and re-calibrate citizenship responsibilities.

Patterns of campaigning and influencing

From the 1980s to the 2000s disabled people campaigned for rights to participate – calling for rights to independent living, freedom from institutions, equality in  […]

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    Consent does matter: boundaries, respect and positive intervention

Consent does matter: boundaries, respect and positive intervention

In the 2017–18 Michaelmas term, LSE and the LSE Students’ Union (LSESU) are introducing ‘Consent Matters: Boundaries, Respect and Positive Intervention’ – an interactive online course on consent. Natasha Davies – LSESU women’s officer – discusses the overwhelming support for the introduction of the course and its importance in enabling students to deal with real life situations. The course […]

September 26th, 2017|Featured, Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Wake up, algorithms are trawling your phone while you sleep

Your web browsing history is the most lucrative piece of information that can be traded, writes Beverley Skeggs. Professor Skeggs will give the public lecture You Are Being Tracked, Evaluated and Sold: an analysis of digital inequalities, hosted by LSE’s International Inequalities Institute.

Wake up, machine learning algorithms have been trawling your phone whilst you slept. If you did. If […]

September 21st, 2017|Featured, Uncategorized|0 Comments|

Employers may discriminate against autism without realising

Employers often think they’re communicating well, but they use ‘neurotypical’ standards of interacting, writes Brett Heasman

Autism is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people connect and relate to others and also how they experience the world around them.

Most non-autistic people are not aware of the complex ways in which autistic people* experience the world and are not adequately prepared […]

  • Lenín Moreno on the campaign trail prior to his election victory in April 2017
    Permalink Lenín Moreno on the campaign trail prior to his election victory in April 2017 (César Muñoz, CC BY-SA 2.0)Gallery

    Ecuador’s election of the global South’s first wheelchair-using president can spark vital debate on disability and development

Ecuador’s election of the global South’s first wheelchair-using president can spark vital debate on disability and development

Terhas Clarke and Alejandra Carvajal introduce us to the work of President Lenín Moreno of Ecuador, the first person in a wheelchair to be elected as a head of state in Latin America, and an influential figure who has improved rights for people with disabilities on an international and national level. They invite readers to join the discussion on […]

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    Women are less likely to study STEM subjects – but disadvantaged women are even less so

Women are less likely to study STEM subjects – but disadvantaged women are even less so

The gender divide in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics study is more complicated than most researchers, policy makers, and practitioners previously thought, writes Natasha Codiroli Mcmaster. She explains that young women’s social circumstances play a key role in whether they choose to study STEM at university.

There is a vast amount of research showing that women are less likely to study […]

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    The Porous University: Impact is not some added extra of academic life, but lies at the core of what we do

The Porous University: Impact is not some added extra of academic life, but lies at the core of what we do

The current university set up has led to a deep malaise. The culture of retreat and lack of an inclusive commitment has fed public perceptions that universities are unapproachable. Michael Stewart argues that thinking more creatively about impact and problem-based learning could help overcome these failures. The management terminology is brittle and ugly, but all impact means is that we are engaged with the world, […]

LSE students’ views on diversity on campus

Mirroring debates in the US, members of universities in the UK are increasingly concerned with the diversity of students and faculty in higher education institutions. Drawing on a methodology developed at Dartmouth College, John Carey, Katie Clayton, Simon Hix and Yusaku Horiuchi present a fascinating analysis of the results of a 2017 survey of the views of LSE undergraduates […]

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    Book Review: The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone by Danny Dorling

Book Review: The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone by Danny Dorling

In The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone, Danny Dorling delivers evidence that more equal countries enjoy better outcomes, with their populations being happier, healthier and more creative, producing less waste and committing fewer crimes. This optimistic book is a pleasure to read, writes Natasha Codiroli Mcmaster, and encourages us to see greater equality – and its social benefits – as being […]

Students’ photo exhibition revaluates ‘diversity’

Juliane Hoss – an LSE postgraduate student – reflects on the project ‘Tackling diversity‘, in which 30 students discovered different meanings of diversity. The project consisted of two workshops, in which the students learned more about the need for diversity and discussed different meanings as well as the development of a photo exhibition, through which the participants shared their […]

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