EU Politics

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    Why more needs to be done to help weaker organisations bid for EU funding

Why more needs to be done to help weaker organisations bid for EU funding

The EU is considered to be the world’s largest public donor and it has claimed to use public funds to promote the participation of organised interests in public policy. Drawing on a new study, Michele Crepaz and Marcel Hanegraaff illustrate that despite claims of balance in how funding is distributed, organisations with larger resources and more experience of making […]

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    Discretion and agency loss: What factors shape the selection of European Parliament rapporteurs?

Discretion and agency loss: What factors shape the selection of European Parliament rapporteurs?

Party group coordinators in the European Parliament are responsible for selecting ‘rapporteurs’, who have an important role in parliamentary committees. But how do coordinators make these decisions? Presenting findings from a new study, Lukas Obholzer, Steffen Hurka and Michael Kaeding illustrate that coordinators are more likely to select like-minded individuals as rapporteurs rather than MEPs who reflect the views […]

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    Beyond Operation Sophia: What role for the military in migration policy?

Beyond Operation Sophia: What role for the military in migration policy?

As a response to the migration crisis in 2015, the EU established ‘Operation Sophia’, a naval mission intended to disrupt established human smuggling networks in the Mediterranean. The mandate for Operation Sophia is due to expire at the end of this month, yet with divisions among member states, there is no agreement on whether it will be extended. Julia […]

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    What the rise of radical nationalism tells us about the debate between postfunctionalism and liberal intergovernmentalism

What the rise of radical nationalism tells us about the debate between postfunctionalism and liberal intergovernmentalism

Postfunctionalism and liberal intergovernmentalism are considered to be two of the ‘grand theories’ of European integration. In a recent article, Andrew Moravcsik, who developed the liberal intergovernmentalist model in the 1990s, has critiqued postfunctionalism, arguing that the politicisation of European integration has little effect on policy outcomes. Liesbet Hooghe and Gary Marks write that the rise of radical nationalism […]

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    Lost in transmission: Why few interest groups have the capacity to properly link citizens with EU policymakers

Lost in transmission: Why few interest groups have the capacity to properly link citizens with EU policymakers

Interest groups can potentially help alleviate the EU’s democratic deficit by acting as a ‘transmission belt’ between citizens and EU policymakers. However, as Adrià Albareda demonstrates, many of the interest groups active at the EU level lack the organisational capacity and member involvement to perform this function in practice.

The European Union has a long standing democratic deficit problem due […]

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    Rethinking refugee support: Responding to the crisis in South Eastern Europe

Rethinking refugee support: Responding to the crisis in South Eastern Europe

The migration crisis that began in 2015 has had a major impact on countries in South Eastern Europe. Outlining findings and recommendations from a new project, Amanda Russell Beattie, Gemma Bird, Jelena Obradovic-Wochnik and Patrycja Rozbicka explain that the EU’s response to the crisis has resulted in the outsourcing of refugee settlement and care to states such as Serbia, […]

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    France-Italy: Behind the crisis lies a deeper rift over Europe

France-Italy: Behind the crisis lies a deeper rift over Europe

A diplomatic row has developed between France and Italy over recent months, with tensions being raised significantly by the decision of Luigi Di Maio, Italy’s Deputy Prime Minister and leader of the Five Star Movement, to meet with representatives of the French ‘Gilets Jaunes’ protest movement. Simon Toubeau explains that at the heart of the conflict lie two radically […]

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    Why the European Parliament’s campaign to increase voter turnout could do more harm than good

Why the European Parliament’s campaign to increase voter turnout could do more harm than good

Ahead of the 2019 European elections in May, the European Parliament has launched a campaign to increase voter turnout. Nils Napierala argues that while this is clearly needed given the low turnout at the last elections in 2014, the campaign runs the risk of fuelling Eurosceptic sentiments by focusing too much on the EU’s successes and not on the […]

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    France and Germany will dominate the EU after Brexit – but they won’t go unchallenged

France and Germany will dominate the EU after Brexit – but they won’t go unchallenged

How will Brexit affect the delicate balance of power in the EU? Ulrich Krotz and Joachim Schild argue that it will boost Franco-German power – but this will not go unchallenged by other EU members, especially the Visegrád bloc and the newly assertive Hanseatic League.

The effects of Brexit will be felt beyond the United Kingdom. The unprecedented exit of a key member state […]

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Enlargement and exit: The origins of Article 50

While it is sometimes compared to a federal superstate, the European Union is different from most federations in that it contains an exit clause: Article 50, which lays out the procedure under which the United Kingdom is currently seeking to withdraw from the EU. But how did Article 50 come to be? Based on a new study, Martijn Huysmans […]

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    France and Germany control the agenda and broker compromises, but they do not dictate Eurozone reforms

France and Germany control the agenda and broker compromises, but they do not dictate Eurozone reforms

The Franco-German relationship is often viewed as one of the key drivers of EU decision-making. But what impact does cooperation between France and Germany actually have on EU politics? Based on a new study of Economic and Monetary Union reforms negotiated between 2010 and 2015, Hanno Degner illustrates that the two countries exert influence by controlling the agenda and […]

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    Distress signals: How Brexit affects the Digital Single Market

Distress signals: How Brexit affects the Digital Single Market

The British government prizes the creative industries as a key part of the UK’s industrial strategy. Yet some of them depend on the Digital Single Market, which is jeopardised by Brexit. Alison Harcourt explains how sectors like broadcasting, online financial services and online gaming could be affected.

A key component of the EU’s Single Market is its Digital Single Market (DSM), […]

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    The ECB’s capital key needs rethinking – and Brexit has everything to do with it

The ECB’s capital key needs rethinking – and Brexit has everything to do with it

The so called ‘capital key’ used by the European Central Bank is due to be reviewed. Sebastian Diessner explains that while in the past this has been viewed as a largely technical process, this time around the issue will have heightened political significance for two reasons in particular: the UK’s upcoming departure from the EU, and the current stand-off […]

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    Germany did not dictate the outcome of the euro crisis negotiations

Germany did not dictate the outcome of the euro crisis negotiations

Germany has generally been credited with exercising a large degree of influence over the EU’s response to the euro crisis. But how accurate is this narrative in reality? Drawing on a new co-authored study focusing on key Eurozone reform proposals, Magnus Lundgren explains that the average negotiation success of states was surprisingly balanced. While the economic woes of the […]

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Italy rues the rules

On 21 November, the European Commission formally objected to Italy’s draft budget for 2019. But the Italian government refuses to compromise. Iain Begg explores what this stand-off might mean for the governance of the Eurozone.

The contest between the Italian government and the European Commission over the former’s budget plans for 2019 has highlighted an enduring problem in EU economic […]

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    Tackling the free rider problem in the EMU does not have to be a zero-sum game: Italy’s budget deficit case

Tackling the free rider problem in the EMU does not have to be a zero-sum game: Italy’s budget deficit case

Italy’s government and the European Commission continue to be locked in a standoff over the Italian budget. Corrado Macchiarelli writes that while the budget plan is badly designed and must be addressed, there is also clearly a need for euro area reforms and more mutual recognition. Ultimately the Economic and Monetary Union is facing a political problem and the […]

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    Ideology (not economics) explains why the Troika treated Ireland less harshly than Greece

Ideology (not economics) explains why the Troika treated Ireland less harshly than Greece

Both Greece and Ireland suffered substantially during the Eurozone crisis, but as Judith Clifton, Daniel Díaz-Fuentes and Ana Lara Gómez write, the two countries’ treatment by the ‘Troika’ of the IMF, European Central Bank and European Commission was strikingly different. Drawing on new research, they explain that much of this stemmed from ideological reasons rather than economics: a far […]

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Germany’s non-rebalancing of its mercantilist model

In a recent blog article, Donato Di Carlo argued that Germany has ‘quietly rebalanced’ its economy since the Eurozone crisis began. Patrick Kaczmarczyk presents a different take on the topic, writing that when German policy is viewed from a more long-term perspective, there has been little in the way of meaningful rebalancing. He states that without necessary adjustments being […]

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    Shifting dynamics: Mapping the divisions between and within party groups in the European Parliament ahead of the 2019 elections

Shifting dynamics: Mapping the divisions between and within party groups in the European Parliament ahead of the 2019 elections

Party competition in the European Parliament has changed substantially in the aftermath of the Eurozone and migration crises. While the parliament was once characterised by a split between parties on the left and right, parties are also now sharply divided over their policies on immigration and European integration. Drawing on new research, Alexia Katsanidou and Zoe Lefkofridi illustrate how […]

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    From ‘Vincolo Esterno’ to ‘Nemico Esterno’: The disturbing new demonisation of the EU

From ‘Vincolo Esterno’ to ‘Nemico Esterno’: The disturbing new demonisation of the EU

The dispute between Italy and the European Commission over the Italian budget for 2019 illustrates a shift in how member states treat the obligations of EU membership. Iain Begg and Kevin Featherstone argue that instead of using pressure from Brussels to justify difficult policy measures, countries are now picking fights with the EU to boost their domestic political standing, thereby […]

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